Archive of ‘online learning’ category

disruptive technologies higher ed

The top 5 disruptive technologies in higher ed

By Leigh M. and Thomas Goldrick June 5th, 2017
The Internet of Things (IoT), augmented reality, and advancements in online learning have changed the way universities reach prospective students, engage with their current student body, and provide them the resources they need.
Online Learning
Despite online learning’s successes, many still believe that it lacks the interaction of its in-person counterpart. However, innovations in pedagogical strategy and technology are helping make it much more engaging.

Competency-based Education

Competency-based education (CBE) recognizes that all students enter a program with different skills and proficiencies and that each moves at a different rate. We now possess the technology to better measure these differences and design adaptive learning programs accordingly. These programs aim to increase student engagement, as time is spent expanding on what the students already know rather than having them relearn familiar material.

The Internet of Things

The Internet of Things has opened up a whole new world of possibilities in higher education. The increased connectivity between devices and “everyday things” means better data tracking and analytics, and improved communication between student, professor, and institution, often without ever saying a word. IoT is making it easier for students to learn when, how, and where they want, while providing professors support to create a more flexible and connected learning environment.

Virtual/Augmented Reality

Virtual and augmented reality technologies have begun to take Higher Ed into the realm of what used to be considered science fiction.

More often than not, they require significant planning and investment into the infrastructure needed to support them.

Artificial Intelligence

an A.I. professor’s assistant or an online learning platform that adapts to each student’s specific needs. Having artificial intelligence that learns and improves as it aids in the learning process could have a far-reaching effect on higher education both online and in-person.

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more on disruptive technologies in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=disruptive+technologies

asynch and LMS online

Asynch Delivery and the LMS Still Dominate for Online Programs

By Dian Schaffhauser  05/22/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/asynch-delivery-and-the-lms-still-dominate-for-online-programs.aspx

a recent research project  by Quality Matters and Eduventures, the “Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE)” offers a “baseline” examination of program development, quality measures and other structural issues.

95 percent of larger programs (those with 2,500 or more online program students) are “wholly asynchronous” while 1.5 percent are mainly or completely synchronous. About three-quarters (73 percent) of mid-sized programs (schools with between 500 and 2,499 online program students) and 62 percent of smaller programs are fully asynchronous.

The asynchronous nature of this kind of education may explain why threaded discussions turned up as the most commonly named teaching and learning technique, mentioned by 27.4 percent of respondents, closely followed by practice-based learning, listed by 27.3 percent of survey participants.

Blackboard and Instructure Canvas dominated. Audio- and videoconferencing come in a “distant second,” according to the researchers. The primary brands that surfaced for those functions were Adobe Connect, Cisco WebEx, Zoom, Kaltura, Panopto, TechSmith Camtasia and Echo360.

While the LMS plays a significant role in online programming, the report pointed to a distinct lack of references to “much-hyped innovations,” such as adaptive learning, competency-based education systems, simulation or game-based learning tools. (my note: my mouth run dry of repeating every time people start becoming orgasmic about LMS, D2L in particular)

four in 10 require the use of instructional design support, three in 10 use a team approach for online course design and one in 10 outsources the work. Overall, some 80 percent of larger programs use instructional design expertise.

In the smallest programs, instructional design support is treated as a “faculty option” for 53 percent of institutions. Another 18 percent expect faculty to develop their online courses independently. For 13 percent of mid-sized programs, the faculty do their development work independently; another 64 percent may choose whether or not to bring in instructional design help. (my note: this is the SCSU ‘case’)

Measuring Quality

Among the many possible quality metrics suggested by the researchers, the five adopted most frequently for internal monitoring were:

  • Student achievement of program objectives (83 percent);
  • Student retention and graduation rates (77 percent);
  • Program reputation (48 percent);
  • Faculty training (47 percent); and
  • Student engagement measures (41 percent).

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

lecture capture on shoestring

8 Tips for Lecture Capture on a Shoestring

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/17/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/17/8-tips-for-lecture-capture-on-a-shoestring.aspx

Whether you’re flipping your courses, creating videos to help your students understand specific concepts or recording lectures for exam review, these tips can help you optimize your production setup on a tight budget.

1) Speak Into the Microphone

2) Reconsider Whether You Want to be a Talking Head

3) Keep Your Recording Device Steady

4) Avoid Using the Camera Built Into Your Laptop

5) Explore a Range of Recording Software
Screencast-O-Matic
TechSmith Camtasia
Adobe Captivate
Adobe Presenter

“online video platforms,”

TechSmith Relay, Panopto, Tegrity and Kaltura

6) Forget About Editing Your Videos

7) Remember Accessibility

Record your video and upload it to YouTube. YouTube will apply its machine transcription to the audio as a starting point. Then you can download the captions into your caption editor and improve on the captions from there. Afterward, you can delete the video from YouTube and add it to your institution’s platform.

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lecture capture in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

social media in your course

8 Things You Should Know before Using Social Media in Your Course

Jennifer Rafferty, Director, OLC Institute for Professional Development, 

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/8-things-you-should-know-before-using-social-media-in-your-course

a variety of available platforms, and many creative ways that faculty are integrating social media into their teaching practice.

  • how the digital medium will foster engagement and enhance learning outcomes.
  • aware of the implications of having students post content on third-party services (those not provided or hosted by your institution).
  • Social media usage in the classroom intersects with both FERPA and Copyright Compliance, so keep this checklist handy as you develop your class activity.

Include details about the activity in your syllabus & course description.

Use contracts.
Link to institutional policies.
Use aliases for social media accounts.
Teach your students to use digital media responsibly.
Know where to provide assignment feedback.
Don’t use personal accounts for university business.
Understand the Terms of Service.

Sources

Classification of Social Media Platforms, DelValle Institute Knowledge Base, Office of Public Health Preparedness. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from  https://delvalle.bphc.org/mod/wiki/view.php?pageid=65

Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. 2005. Using Digital Content. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.copyright.com/Services/copyrightoncampus/basics/teach.html

Educause, Is Your Use of Social Media FERPA Compliant? Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/your-use-social-media-ferpa-compliant

Kind, T., Genrich G. and Chretien, K.(2010)  Social Media Policies at US Medical Schools. Medical Education Online.  Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941429/

Meyer, L., (2015). Six Alternative Social Media Tools for Teaching and Learning, Campus Technology. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2015/01/07/6-Alternative-Social-Media-Tools-for-Teaching-and-Learning.aspx?Page=4

Orlando, J., 2011. FERPA and Social Media, Faculty Focus. Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-with-technology-articles/ferpa-and-social-media/

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more on social media for teaching practices in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+teaching

online learning report

GoConqr Online Learning Report

https://info.goconqr.com/files/2017/02/2017-GoConqr-Online-Learning-Report.pdf

2017-GoConqr-Online-Learning-Report-2017

http://www.ecampusnews.com/online-learning/students-online-learning-trends/

Some of the most outstanding findings we found in this report are:

• Despite the prevalence of social networking, online study tends to be a solitary activity: 79% of people choose not to study collaboratively when they are online.

• Students are using online platforms as an additional source to help with difficult subjects Students from non-native English speaking countries are more likely to use online tools for language learning than native English speakers are.

• Learning is lower down the list of priorities for users of mobile devices. Using mobile devices for education is quite low compared to other activities

• There is a strong trend towards visually engaging material , an area in which the offline world simply cannot compete with the online one

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

digital badges and micro credentials

per Tom Hergert (thank you)

AECT-OTP Webinar: Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials for the Workplace

Time: Mar 27, 2017 1:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

Learn how to implement digital badges in learning environments. Digital badges and micro-credentials offer an entirely new way of recognizing achievements, knowledge, skills, experiences, and competencies that can be earned in formal and informal learning environments. They are an opportunity to recognize such achievements through credible organizations that can be integrated in traditional educational programs but can also represent experience in informal contexts or community engagement.  Three guiding questions will be discussed in this webinar: (1) digital badges’ impact on learning and assessment, (2) digital badges within instructional design and technological frameworks, and (3) the importance of stakeholders for the implementation of digital badges.

Dirk Ifenthaler is Professor and Chair of Learning, Design and Technology at University of Mannheim, Germany and Adjunct Professor at Curtin University, Australia. His previous roles include Professor and Director, Centre for Research in Digital Learning at Deakin University, Australia, Manager of Applied Research and Learning Analytics at Open Universities, Australia, and Professor for Applied Teaching and Learning Research at the University of Potsdam, Germany. He was a 2012 Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education, at the University of Oklahoma, USA

Directions to connect via Zoom Meeting:
Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/8128701328
Or iPhone one-tap (US Toll):  +14086380968,8128701328# or +16465588656,8128701328#
Or Telephone:
Dial: +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll) or +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll)
Meeting ID: 812 870 1328
International numbers available: https://zoom.us/zoomconference?m=EedT5hShl1ELe6DRYI58-DeQm_hO10Cp

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Notes from the webinar
http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/learning+%26+instruction/journal/10758

Technology, Knowledge and Learning

 and

14th International Conference on  Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age 2017 18 – 20 October Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal

http://celda-conf.org/

learning is a process, not a product.

Each student learns differently and assessment is not linear. Learning for different students can be a longer or shorter path.

representation graph:

assessment comes before badges

what are credentials:
how well i can show my credentials: can i find it, can i translate it, issuer, earner, achievement description, date issued.

the potential to become an alternative credentialing system to link directly via metadata to validating evidence of educational achievements.

DB is not an assessment, it is the ability to demonstrate the assessment.
They are a motivational mechanism, supporting alternative forms of assessment, a way to credentialize learning, charting learning pathways, support self-reflection and planning

student engagement

Three Ways to Engage Students In and Outside the Classroom

By:  March 20th, 2017 

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/three-ways-engage-students/

Get real

realistic role-plays are primarily designed to be problem-solving exercises.

See a show

Breathe fire

Breathing life into concepts is the hallmark of effective teaching.

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more on students engagement in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=students+engagement

WordPress and Google Docs

WordPress.com for Google Docs lets you edit in Docs and publish in WordPress

synchronous vs asynchronous

From the The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>

Can you recommend a peer-reviewed research article that addresses the learning outcomes/learning effectiveness of asynchronous vs. synchronous teaching approaches in online courses?

We have a program that has required weekly synchronous sessions (held via Bb Collaborate) that support the otherwise asynchronous courses in the program. The department is considering making that requirement optional to accommodate worldwide learners, but there are faculty who are concerned about the impact to the learning and transfer of knowledge to the students.

Any research that addresses the differences in these teaching modalities when it comes to learning outcomes?

Thanks in advance,     Kristen     Kristen Brown     Assistant Director, Online Learning     Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

I am happy to share my own dissertation research which specifically focused on this topic as well. Please email me and I will share. andy.black@nurs.utah.edu
My note: I emailed Andy and will attach his dissertation to this blog, if interest

final-dissertation-andy-black-asynchronous-synchronous

On Behalf Of Henri Moser
Sent: Friday, January 06, 2017 8:35 AM

Here is a link to my dissertation which centered on synchronous academic support for online graduate students.Best,Henri

http://dune.une.edu/theses/56/

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more on synchronous online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=synchronous

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