InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'online learning' Category

free web-conferencing tool: Stoodle

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 8th January 2014

Stoodle is a web application which allows you, without any download or registration, to create a quick classroom space. By sharing the URL of the classroom you can invite other participants. You can use microphone or text based chat, and upload files (images) to discuss.

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, educational technology, hybrid learning, instructional technology, mobile learning, online learning, Uncategorized | No Comments »

10 Major Mobile Learning Trends to Watch For

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 7th January 2014

  1. Location-based integration.
  2. The domination of ebooks.
  3. Cloud computing in schools.
  4. Bring-your-own-device classrooms.
  5. Online collaborative learning
  6. The rise of the tablet.
  7. Online class management
  8. Social media for education.
  9. Snack learning.
  10. Mobile learning in workplace training.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/07/10-major-mobile-learning-trends-to-watch-for/

Posted in Cloud computing, Desire2Learn (D2L), distance learning, distributive learning, E-Learning Authoring Tool, hybrid learning, information technology, learning, mobile devices, mobile learning, online learning, social media | No Comments »

Media4Math+: iPAD apps for math

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 5th January 2014

nSpire: iPAD app for math: evaluation

http://www.media4mathplus.com/Assets.aspx?search=nspire%20app

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, gaming, hybrid learning, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, iPAD, mobile apps, mobile apps, mobile devices, online learning, social media, technology | No Comments »

What is the difference between education and training?

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 5th January 2014

per LinkedIn discussion: http://www.linkedin.com/groupAnswers?viewQuestionAndAnswers=&discussionID=5822757351727316994&gid=2038260&goback=%2Enmp_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1#commentID_null

What is the difference between education and training?

☆☆☆☆☆ Industrial Automation Training – Industrial Training software to Maintenance, Engineering, Manufacturing.Top Contributor

Schools and companies commonly use the word “Training” when actually all they are delivering is scholastic education. Our company clearly distinguishes between the two which increases our effectiveness and to differentiate what we deliver to customers (what most call students) from others like colleges. I thought it would be interesting to get this group’s members opinion on the difference between “Training” and “Education”, and to get group members thinking about it.

ray schroederray schroeder

Director of the UPCEA Center for Online Leadership and Strategy – and – UIS Associate Vice Chancellor of Online Learning

This is one of those questions, the answers to which will be easy to pick apart. But, I will venture a beginning:

Training is task-oriented. It is circumscribed by circumstances such as location, goal, job, career. Training’s intent is to master a task, method or approach.

Education is a broader activity that spans locations, goals, careers. Education’s intent is life guiding, life changing and lasting.

Training can have lifelong import. But, the focus is on a specific task or goal.

Education often includes task-learning.

Enough. A more important task now demands my attention – breakfast – I have been trained well for this lifelong task.

-ray

 

Rahat iqbal

Executive Director at SCI-EDUCATION SYSTEM,LONDON UK

Training direct develop skills for different profession but education reflects research and update knowledge.

Jolly Holden Jolly Holden

Faculty at American InterContinental University

When asked the difference between education and training, a 4-star general replied…do you want your daughter to have sex training or sex education? Nearly everyone in the audience (1,000+) fell out of there seats. After the laughter subsided, the general went on to reply “fundamentally, education is focused on developing critical thinking skills (know why) that help enable creative solutions, whereas training is about developing specific skill sets (know how) for consistently reliable results.” That said, while there is a large grey area between training and education, per se, when does education stop and training begin, the outcome of both is learning. As a former Air Force flight instructor, I told my students they are educated in the aerodynamics of flight, but trained on how to fly.

Joy Scott Joy Scott

Workplace Performance Improvement, Training, Instructional Design, Independent Writer

I just finished reading The Eden Conspiracy: Educating for Accomplished Citizenship by Joe Harless (1998). He explains (p. 157): “Training and education are often differentiated by saying education is to provide knowledge for unpredictable circumstances; training is for predictable circumstances.”

He also states education is provided in school, (K-college) and training is provided after school (knowledge and skills provided on-the-job). Since Harless published this book, the delivery options of education and training has changed, thanks to the Internet. Education and training can occur anywhere, and without proper context, someone can mix the labels and confuse being trained for a specific task with being educated about something they can use to determine if they should use the task they’ve been trained on.

Harless, J. (1998). The Eden Conspiracy: Educating for Accomplished Citizenship . Wheaton, IL: Guild V Publications.

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, online learning, pedagogy, Project Based Learning, teaching | No Comments »

Integrating Web 2.0 Across the Curriculum

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd December 2013

Integrating Web 2.0 Across the Curriculum

Oliver, K. (2010). Integrating Web 2.0 Across the Curriculum. Techtrends: Linking Research & Practice To Improve Learning54(2), 50-60.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=aph&AN=48574971  PDF available.

Blogs and wikis are among the most frequently cited Web 2.0 tools, but they are just the tip of an integration iceberg

many titles, including Web 2.0, the “read-write Web” (Richardson, 2005-2006), browser-based applications (Descy, 2007) and school 2.0 or classroom 2.0 (Lankshear & Knobel, 2007; Lehmann, 2007).

http://preezo.com/

http://quizlet.com/ see blog entry http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/27/language-and-technology-learn-easy-and-funny/

Posted in information technology, instructional technology, online learning, social media, teaching, technology | No Comments »

higher education and the information age: literature available at SCSU

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd December 2013

 

Breivik, P. S. (1998). Student learning in the information age. Phoenix, Ariz.: American Council on Education/Oryx Press. CETL owns it
Breivik, P. S. (2006). Higher education in the Internet age : libraries creating a strategic edge / (Fully updated and rev. ed.). Praeger Publishers,. Located: St. Cloud State University MC Main Collection – Basement
Call Number: Z675.U5 B816 2006

Posted in Digital literacy, information literacy, learning, Library and information science, media literacy, online learning, teaching, technology literacy | No Comments »

legal issues with diplomas from online/distance education

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 23rd November 2013

CORNELIUS, L. M., & CAVANAUGH, T. W. (2013). Distance Learning, Distant Courtrooms. Chronicle Of Higher Education60(12), A30.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=aph&AN=92043236

http://chronicle.com.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/article/Distance-Learning-Distant/143097/

We are in the early stages of distance-­specific litigation, and most rulings, thus far, have been made at the level of basic trial courts. We await precedents from more senior courts, the possibility of Congressional action, interstate compacts, and other unseen developments for more guidance. At the same time, however, it has also become clear that the new frontier of distance learning is also entering the sphere of courts and lawyers. It is not too early for distance programs and their institutions to take note. – See more at: http://chronicle.com.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/article/Distance-Learning-Distant/143097/#sthash.xGXwBG1D.dpuf

 

 

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, issues, online learning | No Comments »

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th November 2013

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats

This past week, I had the privilege of introducing US Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, as a guest moderator for #edtechchat, an educational Twitter chat that I founded with four members of my personal learning network (PLN).  Over the course of 60 minutes, almost 2,000 people from around the world, shared about 10,000 tweets in response to the Secretary’s six questions related to being a Connected Educator.  Secretary Duncan (@arneduncan) and his Office of Educational Technology (@officeofedtech) deemed October “Connected Educator’s Month” for the second straight year.  To close #ce13, Secretary Duncan used the #edtechchat forum to engage in conversation with educators from all over the world.

In reflecting on the chat, many people asked how to get started, and how to possibly follow such a quick flow of information. For one, 10,000 tweets in an hour is by no means typical; but then again, neither is the opportunity to interact with the US Secretary of Education. Although this particular chat with the Secretary may be an extreme example of what possibilities can arise when connecting with others online, each week there are over 160 chats that occur.  Virtually all topics are covered in some fashion. Whether you’re a 4th grade teacher (#4thchat) in Maryland (#mdedchat), a principal (#cpchat) in Arkansas (#arkedchat), a new teacher (#ntchat) in Rhode Island (#edchatri), or a parent (#ptchat) connecting on a Saturday (#satchat), there’s something for you.

This Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats was created as part of the Digital Learning Transition MOOC (#dltmooc), an online “Massive Open Online Course”, developed by The Alliance for Education (@All4Ed) and the Friday Institute (@FridayInstitute) as part of Project 24 (@all4edproject24).  Feel free to download and share the Quick Start resource to help educators get started.

Furthermore, the Official Chat List was created by Chad Evans (@cevans5095) and me (@thomascmurray), with help from our good friend Jerry Blumengarten (@cybraryman1). This resource (shortcut: bit.ly/officialchatlist) is a comprehensive list of the educational Twitter chats that take place each week.

Start small. Choose a chat that peaks your interest. Lurk, listen, and learn. When you’re ready, jump in head first.  Grow your PLN and get connected through a Twitter chat this week!  Your students will benefit.

- See more at: http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats#sthash.W1DPfmY1.dpuf

Posted in collaboration and creativity, e-learning, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, learning, mobile devices, mobile learning, MOOC, mooc, online learning, open learning, pedagogy, social media, student-centered learning, technology, technology literacy, Twitter | No Comments »

Technology is not a magic bullet.

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th November 2013

http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_chad_evans/technology_not_magic_bullet

Technology is not a magic bullet.

Professional development for administrators and educators often focuses on the “how does it work” as opposed to how should we use this to help students make meaning, communicate, collaborate, and create?  Many unfairly assume that educators are chomping at the bit to design instructional learning experiences using technology.  This is true in some cases.  In other cases, laptops are used as paperweights at worst, and for word processing at best. Tablets are used for games and low level practice skill and drill. A teacher who focuses on memorization and low level thinking skills will not all of a sudden change their stripes when handed a new device.   – See more at: http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_chad_evans/technology_not_magic_bullet#sthash.jlEDWr4T.dpuf

Posted in Bring Your Own Device BYOD, learning, mobile devices, online learning, teaching, technology | No Comments »

Teaching Online and Its Impact on Face-to-Face Teaching (from #POD13)

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 11th November 2013

Teaching Online and Its Impact on Face-to-Face Teaching
Friday, Nov 8, 3:45 PM – 5:00 PM, 35-Minute Research Session B
http://wikipodia.podnetwork.org/pod-2013-conference/presentations-2013/lkearns

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, hybrid learning, mobile learning, online learning, pedagogy, teaching | No Comments »