Archive of ‘Twitter’ category

twitter in class

Eleven effective ways to use Twitter in education

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/12/11-effective-ways-to-use-twitter-in.html

  • Hold after class discussions
  • Create an online community of students
  • Ask questions relevant to course materials
  • Start backchannel talks
  • Create a classroom hashtag
  • Use it for class announcements
  • Get feedback from students
  • Share interesting online materials
  • Pass on information about events
  • Have a Twitter account for each class
  • Reward participation
  • Integrate Twitter into Syllabus

Eleven effective ways to use Twitter in education

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more for the use of Twitter for education in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=twitter

mine social media

How to Successfully Mine Your Social Media Data

by Alex York on June 22, 2016

http://sproutsocial.com/insights/social-media-data/

social media has a strong return on investment (ROI) – how to

Social media data is the collected information from social networks that show how users share, view or engage with your content or profiles. These numbers, percentages and statistics provide better insights into your social media strategy.

social media analytics to make sense of the raw information.
media data as the ingredients to your meal and the analysis as your recipe. Without the recipe, you wouldn’t know what to make or how to cook it.

Some of the raw social media data can include:

  • Shares
  • Likes
  • Mentions
  • Impressions
  • Hashtag usage
  • URL clicks
  • Keyword analysis
  • New followers
  • Comments

Key performance indicators (KPIs) are the various business metrics used to measure and analyze certain aspects of your business. Social media KPIs are the metrics that likely factor into your social media ROI.

Facebook business page, you can analyze some KPIs within the social network. The most essential Facebook metrics include (see entire article).

Twitter Analytics

  • Engagement Rate: Total link clicks, Retweets, favorites and replies on your Tweet divided by total impressions.
  • Followers: Total number of Twitter followers.
  • Link Clicks: Total number of URL and hashtag links clicked.
  • Mentions: How many times your @username was mentioned by others.
  • Profile Visits: Total Twitter profile visits.
  • Replies: How many times people replied to your Tweets.
  • Retweets: Total Retweets received by others.
  • Tweet Impressions: Total of times your Tweet has been viewed whether it was clicked or not.
  • Tweets: How many Tweets you’ve posted.

LinkedIn Analytics

Here are the top LinkedIn metrics:

  • Clicks: Total clicks on a post, company name or logo.
  • Engagement: Total interactions divided by number of impressions.
  • Followers: Total number of new followers through a sponsored update.
  • Impressions: Total times your update was visible to other users.
  • Interactions: Total number of comments, likes, comments and shares.

Google Analytics

  • Average Session Duration: Average session times users spend on your site.
  • Bounce Rate: Percentage of users leaving your site after one page view.
  • New Users: Total number of new users coming to your site for the first time.
  • Pages / Session: Average number of pages a user views each session.
  • Pageviews: Number of pages loaded or reloaded in a browser.
  • Sessions: Total times when users are active on your site.

need to decipher what’s most important.

If you wanted to track audience growth on Facebook, consider engagement rates, new followers, Post reach and organic Likes.

For example, if you launched a social media campaign, track data that highlights your ROI. According to Mashable, your ROI cycle for a social media campaign should be set up in three stages:

  1. Launch
  2. Management
  3. Optimization

41% of companies and agencies no clue about their social media financial impact. It’s nearly impossible to figure out data overnight. Instead, it takes months of tracking to ensure your future business decisions are valuable.

Sprout’s suite of social media analytics tools give you presentation-ready reports on major social networks.

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more on social media analytics:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+analytics

more on social media stats in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+statistics

 

Twitter in journalism

‘Everyone on Twitter is talking about it’ is not the same as everyone talking about it

Trapped in their self-referential Twitter bubble, journalists often fail to realize that social media doesn’t represent the whole world

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jan/12/twitter-talking-journalists-social-media

Over the past few years, Twitter’s status as a platform for public debate is a dog-whistle platitude that has become the gilded shield of First-Amendment-waving journalists everywhere, like our very own #NotAllMen hashtag, to justify the mishandling – and, in some cases, even endangerment – of our sources for digital stories (and, yes, tweets should be considered sources).

improvements in social media tools

New features in social media tools

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/twitter-improves-how-photos-are-displayed-social-media-news

Twitter Improves How Photos Are Displayed

Twitter is “making your twitter.com timeline more immersive by uncropping photos, so you can experience and present them as they were meant to be viewed.”

Facebook Provides New Admin Tools for Managing Page Communication: Facebook is “giving admins more control over their Page’s responsiveness badge” and rolling out “new features that make it easier than ever for Page admins to manage both the public and private interactions they receive.”

Facebook Improves News Feed for Slower Network Connections: “You can also now compose comments on posts when you are offline. The comments will appear to your friends when you next get a good internet connection.”

YouTube Unveils New Trending Tab: This new tab in the YouTube app delivers the top trending videos directly to Android, iOS and desktop devices.

Google Introduces Shared Albums in Google Photos: Google has introduced shared albums in Google Photos

twitter audience

6 Steps to Finding Your Twitter Audience

http://snip.ly/qS1o#http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/228113

smart tools, six steps…

1. Target keywords in Twitter bios. Say you’re promoting an app for a half-marathon in Chicago. With the help of a few tools you can quickly create lists of your targets.

  •  Social Bro: Those with a subscription can search all Twitter bios by keyword (runner) and location (Chicago), name and url to find the active profiles that fit your needs. Additionally, you can organize your search results into Twitter lists.
  • FollowerWonk: With this free tool you can search profiles by keyword, name, location and url. The results can be exported to xls or csv.
  • Twitter‘s “people search” feature: Any user has access to this recently launched feature, however, searches are limited to keywords.
6 Steps to Finding Your Twitter Audience

2. Find active users and influencers.

3. Find those who use a particular hashtag.

4. Organize your results.

5. Don’t forget your tweeps.

6. Interact and monitor.

 

twitter chat

How to Host and Promote a Twitter Chat

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-host-and-promote-a-twitter-chat/

listen to the show: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/?powerpress_pinw=86452-sme-show

#1: Define the Objective

Always start by defining the objective of your Twitter chat. Find a topic that will appeal to your target audience.

The chat needs to provide value to your audience to be successful. Don’t make it just about your company; tailor it to how you can help your community. For example, if you’re in the photography industry, invite guests to discuss photo editing tips, black-and-white photography, photography inspiration, etc.

An added benefit is that you can repurpose all of the chat contributions into a future blog post. Those who participated in the chat will appreciate having a summary of it, and readers who missed it will enjoy the insight.

#2: Identify Similar Chats

Once you’ve established an objective for your chat, find at least five Twitter chats similar to yours to gather ideas. You can find Twitter chats with tools like TweetReports and Gnosisarts.

TweetReports shows the scheduled times for chats on various topics.

Learn how these chats work. Observe how the host controls the flow of conversation and directs topics. Also find out which guests are invited, how many questions are posed, what times the chats are held and how they’re promoted.

Be sure to participate as well. Answer questions and engage with others. This allows you to build your expertise and gives you insight into what it’s like to participate in a Twitter chat.

#3: Set the Date and Time

#4: Choose a Hashtag

Now comes the fun part: naming your Twitter chat. Typically every chat hashtag ends with “chat” (for example, #mediachat, #influencerchat and #blogchat). Adding the word “chat” signals to people that it’s a Twitter chat instead of a regular hashtag or an event.

When choosing a hashtag, make sure it fits your brand. Also, check that it’s not a Twitter username and hasn’t been used as a hashtag previously.

Use Twitter search to see if your chat hashtag has been used before.

Brainstorm at least 15 chat names and then pick the best one. You might want to seek input from your co-workers.

After you select a hashtag, make sure that you register the Twitter username. You can use this account to hold your chats.

#5: Invite Guests

Next, make a list of at least 20 guests you want to invite.

Ideally, you want someone who has experience being a guest and is interested in holding Twitter chats. If you have an influential user who loves your company, consider inviting that person to be a guest, too.

#6: Prepare Questions

Once you have everything in place and have secured at least four guests in advance, start preparing questions. You’ll need about 7 to 10 questions for your guests. Send these questions to them at least 72 hours prior to the chat so they can prepare their responses.

During the chat, spread out the questions about 6 to 8 minutes apart. Ask your last question about 10 minutes before the end of the chat to allow time for the community to discuss it.

#7: Promote the Chat

The key to making your Twitter chat stand out is to promote it. Here are some ways to do that:

Partner With Other Chats

tweet chats partner tweet

Partner with other chats to co-promote your chats.

Invite Fans

Promote your chat 12 to 24 hours prior to the event.

Send a Facebook event invite as another way to ask people to join your chat. This is a great way to make sure people will come and remember the date. You can also get word out by sending an email blast through your newsletter.

#8: Run the Chat

On the big day, you’ll need an outline to work from. Here’s a basic script for a Twitter chat.

Five Minutes Before the Chat

Our chat will start in a few minutes. In the meantime, please introduce yourself and what you do [#chatname].

Start of the Chat

It’s time for our [#chatname]! Tonight’s guest is @_____ from _____ who will share _____ with us.

Everyone, please welcome our guest _____ from @_____ to our [#chatname] tonight!

Two to Three Minutes Before the Chat Ends

Everyone, please thank @_____ from _____ for adding so much value to our [#chatname].

Next week we’ll have @_____ from _____, who will be discussing _____. See you next week!

Don’t forget to join (other Twitter chat that you partnered with) now! They have @_____ as their guest.

The easiest way to manage your chat is to use a tool like TweetChat. You can hide retweets so you see mentions only from people, which enables you to respond quickly. TweetChat also automatically adds the chat hashtag to your responses.

#9: Track Results

Twitter Profile Stand Out

How to Make Your Twitter Profile Stand Out

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/make-your-twitter-profile-stand-out

#1: Zig When They Zag

This one’s easy: Don’t do what everyone else is doing. If you see a trend popping up in bios, don’t immediately change your bio to reflect that trend. Everyone ends up using the same verbiage, the same phrases, the same descriptors.

Another trend is to include a disclaimer—the most popular being, “Views are my own.” This is the Twitter equivalent of saying “I will bore you to death.” This disclaimer doesn’t serve any real legal purpose, nor will it save your job. If your employer requires it, do it, but other than that, leave it off.

The key takeaway here? When you see a trend, run the other way. If you’re compelled to follow a popular trend, at least put it through your personal lens first. Change it enough that the thread is there, but it’s clear you’ve put more thought into it than simply following the crowd.

#2: Use Brief Sentences and Links

Make an impact on your audience by crafting a sentence or two that convey your expertise. Choose the most important things you do; state them in a clear, compelling way; and then explain why your skills should matter to the visitor. The challenge, of course, is brevity.

In addition consider that hashtags, @s and links—the language of Twitter—are clickable in your profile. I’m always surprised that more people aren’t using these valuable opportunities in their Twitter bios.

Jim Cramer’s Twitter bio has two simple, concise sentences that promote and link to his website, charitable trust, his CNBC show and his blog.

It would have been easy to make a laundry list of those properties along with his book titles and accolades (just like everyone else). Instead, two well-crafted sentences emphasize his most important efforts and include links to each.

 

In your Twitter settings you have the option to set your location and provide a link to your website. Since Cramer’s main bio already links to his website, he uses his sidebar link to point to his author page.

Make the most of your real estate. If you have too much to convey in a sentence or two, get creative—use your sidebar link.

If you operate other accounts, go ahead and add them. These simple links are such an easy way to build your followers for other accounts or your website. Don’t miss out on this opportunity.

#3: Use One Word

On the other hand, you don’t always need a list of keywords or even sentences to convey your sentiment. Sometimes, a single word can make a serious impact.

If you can creatively distill your abilities to one word, you’ve snagged yourself a punchy, powerful piece of the creativity pie.

#4: Stretch the Truth

I’m not talking about lying about your abilities. I’m talking about tongue-in-cheek obvious exaggeration.

An obvious “lie” can be funny and attract attention. For example, since when is Ellen an ice road trucker?

#5: Update Frequently

Smart Twitter users know that a static profile is boring and uncreative. Change it up based on what’s current in your career or marketing initiatives.

Changing your profile bio helps you keep followers abreast of your new accolades or endeavors (e.g., launching a new business or writing a book). Adapting your profile keeps you interesting. And best of all, it forces you to be creative more often.

#6: Acknowledge Your Audience

Say “hello” or “goodbye” to your followers. When you speak directly to someone, you stand a much better chance of actually gaining his or her attention.

Use the word “you” rather than “I” in your profile—it becomes more of a personal message and less of a brag. With that simple change, your bio becomes more inviting.

Over to You

The New York Times calls Twitter bios a postmodern art form. If it’s an art form, then we are the artists. I encourage you to try some of these tips and see where your own creative artistry takes you.

Creativity doesn’t come with an instruction manual. You’ll probably find yours at weird moments when you least expect it. I know a lot of people who have that a-ha! moment in the shower!

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