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Archive for the 'teaching' Category

Wearable Technology: How Teachers Could Use it with Students – See more at: http://www.tabletsforschools.org.uk/wearable-technology-how-teachers-could-use-it-with-students/#sthash.d7njCEYD.dpuf

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 7th September 2014

Wearable Technology: How Teachers Could Use it with Students – See more at: http://www.tabletsforschools.org.uk/wearable-technology-how-teachers-could-use-it-with-students/#sthash.d7njCEYD.dpuf

Wearable Technology: How Teachers Could Use it with Students

Posted in Digital literacy, gamification, instructional technology, media literacy, mobile apps, teaching, technology literacy, video | No Comments »

5 short questions to ask students

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 6th September 2014

5 Effective Questions You Should Be Able to Ask Your Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

  • What do you think?
  • Why do you think that ?
  • How do know this?
  • Can you tell me more?
  • What questions do you still have?

5 Effective Questions You Should Be Able to Ask Your Students

Posted in teaching | No Comments »

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 2nd September 2014

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

http://www.edudemic.com/open-badges-in-education/

Higher education institutions are abuzz with the concept of Open Badges. The concept was presented to SCSU CETL some two years ago, but it remained mute on the SCSU campus. Part of the presentation to the SCSU CETL included the assertion that “Some advocates have suggested that badges representing learning and skills acquired outside the classroom, or even in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), will soon supplant diplomas and course credits.”

For higher education institutions interested in keeping pace, establishing a digital ecosystem around badges to recognize college learning, skill development and achievement is less a threat and more an opportunity. Used properly, Open Badge systems help motivate, connect, articulate and make transparent the learning that happens inside and outside classrooms during a student’s college years.

Educational programs that use learning design to attach badges to educational experiences according to defined outcomes can streamline credit recognition.

The badge ecosystem isn’t just a web-enabled transcript, CV, and work portfolio rolled together. It’s also a way to structure the process of education itself. Students will be able to customize learning goals within the larger curricular framework, integrate continuing peer and faculty feedback about their progress toward achieving those goals, and tailor the way badges and the metadata within them are displayed to the outside world.

 

Posted in Digital literacy, educational technology, evaluation, learning styles, Multiple intelligences, pedagogy, teaching | No Comments »

Ohio lawmakers want to limit the teaching of the scientific process

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st September 2014

Ohio lawmakers want to limit the teaching of the scientific process

http://arstechnica.com/science/2014/08/ohio-lawmakers-want-to-ban-schools-from-teaching-scientific-process/

what happens when politicians decide to meddle in the process called education.

 

 

Posted in learning, teaching, Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Teaching Is Not a Business

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 17th August 2014

Teaching Is Not a Business

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/08/17/opinion/sunday/teaching-is-not-a-business.html

Business does have something to teach educators, but it’s neither the saving power of competition nor flashy ideas like disruptive innovation.

While technology can be put to good use by talented teachers, they, and not the futurists, must take the lead. The process of teaching and learning is an intimate act that neither computers nor markets can hope to replicate. Small wonder, then, that the business model hasn’t worked in reforming the schools — there is simply no substitute for the personal element.

 

Posted in teaching, technology | No Comments »

Why and How Teachers Are Using Twitter

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 12th July 2014

 Why and How Teachers Are Using Twitter

http://www.edudemic.com/teachers-are-using-twitter/

Why and How Teachers Are Using Twitter

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, hybrid learning, information technology, instructional technology, learning, online learning, social media, teaching, Twitter | No Comments »

Constructivism: Lecture and project-based learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 28th June 2014

The blog entry title initially was:

Constructivism: Lecture versus project-based learning

Actually, the article is about both lecture and group work finding a niche in the complex process of teaching and learning.

Excellent points, ideas and discussion in and under a recently published article:

Anyone Still Listening? Educators Consider Killing the Lecture

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/07/anyone-still-listening-educators-consider-killing-the-lecture/

“Professors do not engage students enough, if at all, when trying to innovate the classroom. It’s shocking how out of touch they can be, just because they didn’t take the time to hear their students’ perspectives.”

The article and the excellent comments underneath the article do not address the possibility of cultural differences. E.g., when article cites the German research, it fails to acknowledge that the US culture is pronouncedly individualistic, whereas other societies are more collective. For more information pls consider:
Ernst, C. T. (2004). Richard E. Nisbett. The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently … and Why. Personnel Psychology, (2), 504.
Nisbett, R. E. (2009). Intelligence and how to get it : why schools and cultures count / Richard E. Nisbett. New York : W.W. Norton & Co., c2009.
The article generalizes, since another omission is the subject-oriented character of the learning process: there are subjects, where lecture might be more prevalent and there are some where project learning, peer instruction and project-based learning might be more applicable.

Posted in collaboration and creativity, learning, teaching | No Comments »

The Overworked Bachelor’s Degree Needs a Makeover

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 27th June 2014

The Overworked Bachelor’s Degree Needs a Makeover

http://m.chronicle.com/article/The-Overworked-Bachelors/147105

see also our blog post: Generation Z – the time of emojis approaching
Advanced college degrees are less important to them. 64% of Gen Z-ers are considering an advanced college degree, compared to 71% of millennials.
http://www.businessinsider.com/generation-z-spending-habits-2014-6#ixzz35nFL8oRS

What’s desperately needed is a bachelor’s-degree makeover, one that isolates the liberal-arts education everyone needs in a fast-changing global economy and is flexible enough to accommodate the demand for skills training throughout one’s life.

 

Posted in digital citizenship, learning, pedagogy, teaching | No Comments »

How Social Media Is Being Used In Education: excellent infographic

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd June 2014

How Social Media Is Being Used In Education

http://www.edudemic.com/social-media-in-education/

Here is also an IMS blog entry about the use of Twitter in education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/05/twitter-resources-for-its-use-in-education/

how social media is being used in education

Posted in Digital literacy, information literacy, mobile apps, mobile devices, mobile learning, online learning, pedagogy, social media, teaching, technology literacy | No Comments »

The Myth Of Student Engagement

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 22nd May 2014

The Myth Of Student Engagement

http://inservice.ascd.org/education-resources/the-myth-of-student-engagement/

Teaching and Learning: The Chicken and the Egg

the heart of the student engagement myth: that adding or changing classroom elements, doing a new project, or exposing a student to a new technology or method of instruction will magically transform apathy into a white-hot fire of curiosity.

True engagement comes when a teacher knows a student’s strengths and interests beyond the classroom and uses that knowledge to deepen relationships. If we go into our rooms each day to teach but not connect, we can’t expect students to care beyond a test score, if that.

Can you answer these questions about your students? If you can, how do you apply that knowledge to connect with them?

*What home issues are affecting their work?

*Do they have a non-academic passion?

*What are their favorite shows, games, songs, or books?

*Do they have a preferred learning style?

*What is their hidden talent?

*What goals do they have for themselves in the future?

My note: easily said then done; if the instructor is overloaded with 4 classes 100 students per class, the suggestion above is rendered useless.

Posted in learning, teaching | No Comments »