Archive of ‘teaching’ category

Lawnmower Parents Teachers

Lawnmower Parents Are the New Helicopter Parents & We Are Not Here for It

Chances are, you’ve met this new breed of parent.

August 30, 2018

Lawnmower parents go to whatever lengths necessary to prevent their child from having to face adversity, struggle, or failure.

If we eliminate all struggle in children’s younger years, they will not arrive at adulthood magically equipped to deal with failure.

They will very likely respond in one or more of the following ways:

  • Blame the professor
  • Call home and beg their parents to intervene
  • Have a mental breakdown or make themselves miserable
  • Write nasty reviews online about the professor and their class
  • Begin planning for the inevitable destruction of their college career/future
  • Assume they failed because they’re stupid
  • Collapse in on themselves and give up completely and stop trying

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https://pittsburgh.citymomsblog.com/mom/rise-lawnmower-parent/

The Rise of the Lawnmower Parent

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Forget Lawnmower Parents–I Was a Lawnmower Teacher

Get out of the way, I’m coming through!

https://www.weareteachers.com/lawnmower-teacher/

What is a lawnmower teacher?

The definition of lawnmower parent is “one who goes to whatever lengths necessary to prevent their child from having to face adversity, struggle, or failure.” And it’s pretty much the same for a lawnmower teacher. The kids I teach are my children, and I did A LOT to help them along.

How to make a shift, in the interest of the students

  1. Notice the difficulties students have without judgement.
  2. Develop a strategy to help them resolve the difficulty.
  3. Explicitly teach the strategy.
  4. Create a system for monitoring use of the strategy.
  5. Congratulate the student when he or she uses the strategy effectively.

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more on helicopter parents in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=helicopter+parents

Churchill and the Greek resistance

How Churchill broke the Greek Resistance

How Winston Churchill and the British government attacked the Greek Resistance and sowed the seeds of civil war.

in December 1944: Nazi troops were still resisting the Allies, which were making slow progress in Italy and being pushed back in the Ardennes faced with the Wehrmacht’s final counter-offensive. Yet the “bands” here targeted by Churchill were not groups of collaborators, but the partisans of the great National Liberation Front (EAM), which had for three years mounted mass resistance against the German occupiers.
Throughout the nineteenth century, the eastern Mediterranean had been the center of a rivalry between Britain and Russia. The Bolshevik Revolution of October 1917 having put an end to the latter country’s ambitions in the region, in the early 1940s, Greece was under unchallenged British influence. In this context, the country was of some strategic importance.
during the Quadrant Conference with Roosevelt in Quebec (August 17-24, 1943), Churchill saw his last hopes of an Allied landing in Greece vanish. Meanwhile, the Red Army’s advance beyond the USSR’s own frontiers was no longer in doubt. Churchill now took matters directly in hand, despite his advisers’ reticence, blocking off any possibility of negotiation and sending the EAM delegates home. At the same time, in a note to his high command, he drafted what would later become the MANNA plan: namely, to send an expeditionary corps to Greece after the German troops’ withdrawal.
The EAM-ELAS nonetheless succeeded in liberating a large part of the country. It established popular institutions which formed a counter-state. The worries among the British peaked in March 1944, when a “government of the mountains” was created that organized elections. Conversely, this approach awakened the enthusiasm of the Greek armed forces in Egypt, who immediately demanded that the Resistance be included in the exile government. Churchill replied with pitiless repression. He had “rebellious” elements deported to camps in Africa, and set up a praetorian guard prepared to return to Greece with the King and the British troops upon Liberation.
Everything was set for the application of the MANNA plan, which had been prepared the previous year. The victorious Red Army offensive in Bulgaria in September 1944 forced the Wehrmacht to withdraw from Greece, under attack from ELAS partisans. It was after this retreat that the British expeditionary corps arrived, accompanied by Papandreou and Scobie. Establishing themselves in the capital on October 18, the two men demanded that ELAS lay down its weapons, even as they rejected the disarming of the praetorian guard that had been formed in Egypt and, conveniently enough, transferred to Athens in early November.
December 3, 1944, saw a monster demonstration in Syntagma Square to demand Papandreou’s resignation and the constitution of a new government. The massacre that followed — the police opened fire on unarmed civilians, leaving over twenty dead and more than a hundred wounded — triggered the insurrection of the people of Athens. This was the pretext that Churchill had sought in order to be able to break the Resistance.
While the ELAS was still present across the rest of Greece’s territory, its leaders dreaded imposing new trials on an exhausted and famished population: 1,770 villages had been burned, more than a million people did not have a roof over their heads, and grain production had fallen by 40 percent. Meanwhile, the Allies’ aid only reached those who collaborated with them. With the Varkiza accord signed on February 12, 1945, the ELAS agreed unilaterally to give up its weapons. At the same time at Yalta, Churchill, together with Roosevelt and Stalin, solemnly proclaimed “the right of all peoples in liberated Europe to choose their own form of government.”
In breaking the Greek Resistance, the British had precipitated a civil war that would last — in open or latent forms — for some thirty years, with a brief lull between 1963 and 1965. It would only end with the fall of the colonels’ dictatorship in 1974. This “coup in Athens” reminds us that through its history, modern Greece has only enjoyed a very limited sovereignty.

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more on history in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

Arne Duncan and ed reforms

OPINION: Arne Duncan, the fallible narrator

OPINION: Arne Duncan, the fallible narrator

Aaron Pallas weighs in on Arne Duncan’s “How Schools Work: An Inside Account of Failure and Success from One of the Nation’s Longest-Serving Secretaries of Education”

The 53-year-old Duncan has been, in my view, the most influential of the 11 Secretaries of Education since the founding of the U.S. Department of Education in 1980.

That’s not necessarily a compliment. Mr. Chips was influential. So was Walter White of Breaking Bad.

the essential contradiction of Arne Duncan: He claims to be driven by data, but he prefers a good story.

Duncan devotes three of the 10 chapters in his book to the Race to the Top competition, the basis for my claim that he has been the most influential Secretary of Education in American history. This competition propelled many states to alter their education laws and policies to bolster their chances of feeding at a $4.4 billion federal trough in the aftermath of the Great Recession. Even states that ultimately were not awarded Race to the Top funds bent their policies toward the competition’s priorities. What a brilliant stroke! Even the chance of a carrot had the desired effect! (A federally funded evaluation concluded that, because academic performance in the states that won awards was already trending upward at the time of the awards, the effect of Race to the Top on students’ academic learning was unclear.)

It’s a small leap to conclude that a great teacher is defined by the ability to raise test scores.

 

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more on RTTT and NCLB in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=nclb

digital literacy ENGL 101

English 101 materials for discussion on digital literacy.

Jamie Heiman.

All materials on #DigitalLiteracy in the IMS blog here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Scenario for digital literacy in English classes:

What do virtual reality, BuzzFeed quizzes and essay writing have in common?

https://www.educationdive.com/news/what-do-virtual-reality-buzzfeed-quizzes-and-essay-writing-have-in-common/527868/

July 18, 2018

high school students now create infographics, BuzzFeed-like quizzes and even virtual reality (VR) experiences to illustrate how they can research, write and express their thoughts.

technology — using sites like CoSpaces Edu and content learning system Schoology (my note: the equivalnet of D2L at SCSU) — to engage and empower her students.

Thinklink, during a session called “Virtually Not an Essay: Technological Alternatives to a standard essay assignment.” (see this blog materials on ThingLink and like here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=thinglink. The author made typo by calling the app “ThinKlink, instead of ThinGlink. Also, to use Thinglink’s Video 360 editor, the free account is not sufficient and the $125/month upgrade is needed. Not a good solution for education)

Jamie: I would love to discuss with you #infographics and #Thinglink for use in your courses and the Departmental course.

Digital literacy (DL): options, ideas, possibilities

grading for art faculty

Meaningful Grading: A Guide for Faculty in the Arts

Natasha Haugnes, Hoag Holmgren, and Martin Springborg

https://wvupressonline.com/node/759#2

Martin’s own LinkedIn post: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/activity:6425014893287657472/

College and university faculty in the arts (visual, studio, language, music, design, and others) regularly grade and assess undergraduate student work but often with little guidance or support. As a result, many arts faculty, especially new faculty, adjunct faculty, and graduate student instructors, feel bewildered and must “reinvent the wheel” when grappling with the challenges and responsibilities of grading and assessing student work.

Meaningful Grading: A Guide for Faculty in the Arts enables faculty to create and implement effective assessment methodologies—research based and field tested—in traditional and online classrooms. In doing so, the book reveals how the daunting challenges of grading in the arts can be turned into opportunities for deeper student learning, increased student engagement, and an enlivened pedagogy.

disrupting higher education

How my university is disrupting higher education

BY MARK LOMBARDI March 29th, 2018
https://www.ecampusnews.com/online-learning/university-disrupting-higher-education/
Disruption in higher education needs to happen everywhere, from admissions processes to business practices and from the way we teach to the way we determine student outcomes.
examining every aspect of what’s “traditional” in higher education, right down to the core of the culture.

How to disrupt

1. Change the way you deliver instruction.

2. Focus on post-graduation.

3. Upgrade the entire student experience.
It’s not about fancy buildings or amenities—it’s about providing better customer service.

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=disrupt

Incompetent Leader

The Most Common Type of Incompetent Leader

Scott Gregory  MARCH 30, 2018

https://hbr.org/2018/03/the-most-common-type-of-incompetent-leader

Researchers have studied managerial derailment — or the dark side of leadership — for many years. The key derailment characteristics of bad managers are well documented and fall into three broad behavioral categories: (1) “moving away behaviors,” which create distance from others through hyper-emotionality, diminished communication, and skepticism that erodes trust; (2) “moving against behaviors,” which overpower and manipulate people while aggrandizing the self; and (3) “moving toward behaviors,” which include being ingratiating, overly conforming, and reluctant to take chances or stand up for one’s team. The popular media is full of examples of bad leaders in government, academia, and business with these characteristics.

Absentee leadership rarely comes up in today’s leadership or business literature, but research shows that it is the most common form of incompetent leadership.

Absentee leaders are people in leadership roles who are psychologically absent from them. They were promoted into management, and enjoy the privileges and rewards of a leadership role, but avoid meaningful involvement with their teams. Absentee leadership resembles the concept of rent-seeking in economics — taking value out of an organization without putting value in. As such, they represent a special case of laissez-faire leadership, but one that is distinguished by its destructiveness.

Having a boss who lets you do as you please may sound ideal, especially if you are being bullied and micromanaged by your current boss. However, a 2015 survey of 1,000 working adults showed that eight of the top nine complaints about leaders concerned behaviors that were absent; employees were most concerned about what their bosses didn’t do.

Research shows that being ignored by one’s boss is more alienating than being treated poorly. The impact of absentee leadership on job satisfaction outlasts the impact of both constructive and overtly destructive forms of leadership. Constructive leadership immediately improves job satisfaction, but the effects dwindle quickly. Destructive leadership immediately degrades job satisfaction, but the effects dissipate after about six months. In contrast, the impact of absentee leadership takes longer to appear, but it degrades subordinates’ job satisfaction for at least two years. It also is related to a number of other negative outcomes for employees, like role ambiguityhealth complaints, and increased bullying from team members. Absentee leadership creates employee stress, which can lead to poor employee health outcomes and talent drain, which then impact an organization’s bottom line.

Because absentee leaders don’t actively make trouble, their negative impact on organizations can be difficult to detect, and when it is detected, it often is considered a low-priority problem. Thus, absentee leaders are often silent organization killers. Left unchecked, absentee leaders clog an organization’s succession arteries, blocking potentially more effective people from moving into important roles while adding little to productivity. Absentee leaders rarely engage in unforgivable bouts of bad behavior, and are rarely the subject of ethics investigations resulting from employee hotline calls. As a result, their negative effect on organizations accumulates over time, largely unchecked.

Constructive leadership creates high engagement and productivity, while destructive leadership kills engagement and productivity. 

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more on what makes “great leader” in this IMS blog

leader charts

leader charts

What makes a great leader, explained in eight counterintuitive charts

Shane Snow June 5, 2018

https://work.qz.com/1297375/what-makes-a-great-leader-explained-in-eight-counterintuitive-charts/

Flexible Visionaries

Opinionated Adapters

Ego-Free Fighters

Intellectually Humble

Different And United

Supportive Adversaries

Angelic Troublemakers

Skeptical Optimists

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leaders influence people and performance

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more on ed leader in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leader

more on incompetent leader (absentee leader) in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/07/14/incompetent-leader/

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