Archive of ‘compensation’ category

Low Morale of Online Faculty

Here’s what some of the faculty who agreed to have their comments posted had to say about what lowers their morale:

  • Sean-David McGoran noted that students allowed to bully faculty, repetitious and unnecessary training and unreasonable deadlines at final and midterm examination time can be demoralizing.
  • Linda Chilson said that pay, curriculum that doesn’t make sense, student behavioral issues and school districts funding unnecessary training are issues, as well as lack of support for out of the box thinking.
  • Leah Murray noted that micromanaging every little detail is demoralizing – and understandably added, “why not teach the class yourself if you are going to pay that much attention“. She also noted that lack of positive reinforcement and others taking credit for work you did is troubling.
  • Mary Kay Westgate-Taylor cited poor new faculty orientation, unclear expectations, micromanagement and lack of support from administration regarding student issues as concerns.
  • Dr Steve Woodsmall noted open admissions – too many graduate students who aren’t able or willing to do graduate level work or have a sense of entitlement (paying tuition guaranteeing a degree) and complaining when they receive clearly deserved failing grades causes low morale.
  • Quiana Bradshaw noted that schools acting like adjuncts don’t matter causes low morale. Adjuncts often work hard with no promotional opportunities with no mentoring or encouragement, and only veteran individuals offered promotions. Not including adjuncts as part of the team or micromanaging adjuncts with reports and comments is concerning.
  • Jeanie Rogers-Street noted that education not being the driving force of education (instead, finances being the main focus) is a cause of low morale.
  • Christina Krepinevich Houston noted rude emails from supervisors as a cause of low morale.
  • Stacie Williams commented that supervisors or administrators with a lack of experience in curriculum design and hiring skills dismissing the experience and knowledge of instructors is demoralizing.
  • Traci Schneider Cull noted that not having support from online higher-ups or fixing issues in courses/not responding causes low morale.
  • Nicki Favero Puckett cited continuous increases in workload without additional compensation as a cause.
  • Terri Hennessy Craig stated that severely under, or unprepared, students and canceling classes (particularly without notice) is a cause of low morale.
  • Maria Toy noted micromanagement and an increased workload with no additional compensation as a low morale cause

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this conversation continues in this LInkedIn discussion group: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/2774663/2774663-6341436320048648193

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

leadership in finland

Lessons From Finland: What Educators Can Learn About Leadership

adjuncts

The Cost of an Adjunct

The plight of non-tenured professors is widely known, but what about the impact they have on the students they’re hired to instruct?

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/05/the-cost-of-an-adjunct/394091

When a college contracts ‘adjunctivitis,’ it’s the students who lose

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/when-a-college-contracts-adjunctivitis-its-the-students-who-lose/

Here is an “apologetic” article that adjuncts are not that bad for students and learning:

Are Adjunct Professors Bad for Students?

Some doubts about a recent study suggesting that part-time faculty fail to “connect” with students.

http://www.popecenter.org/commentaries/article.html?id=2045

 

9 Reasons Why Being An Adjunct Faculty Member Is Terrible

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/11/adjunct-faculty_n_4255139.html

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The Adjunct Revolt: How Poor Professors Are Fighting Back

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/04/the-adjunct-professor-crisis/361336/

“Students aren’t getting what they pay for or, if they are, it is because adjuncts themselves are subsidizing their education,” Maria Maisto, president of the adjunct activist group New Faculty Majority, told me. “Adjuncts are donating their time; they are providing it out of pocket.”

The adjunct crisis also restricts the research output of American universities. For adjuncts scrambling between multiple short-term, poorly paid teaching jobs, producing scholarship is a luxury they cannot afford. “We have lost an entire generation of scholarship because of this,”

Adjunct Professor Salary

http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Adjunct_Professor/Salary

The New Old Labor Crisis

Think being an adjunct professor is hard? Try being a black adjunct professor.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/counter_narrative/2014/01/adjunct_crisis_in_higher_ed_an_all_too_familiar_story_for_black_faculty.html

 

 

Online Learning: TUITION AND COMPENSATION FOR ONLINE COURSES

online learning

TUITION AND COMPENSATION FOR ONLINE COURSES

Useful discussion on the Educause Listserv “Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group

http://www.educause.edu/discuss/teaching-and-learning/blended-and-online-learning-constituent-group/tuition-and-compensation-online-courses

Per Ann Hamilton from Penn State and Linda Futch with U of Central FL, it is obvious that compensation varies all across the board.

Steve Covello’s comment most probably will resonate with any faculty, who had taught online.

What are your thoughts as a faculty about how you need to be compensated for teaching online, versus F2F course?