Archive of ‘teaching’ category

charter schools

Just What IS A Charter School, Anyway?

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more on charter schools in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=charter+schools

Alternative Education

‘Alternative’ Education: Using Charter Schools to Hide Dropouts and Game the System

School officials nationwide dodge accountability ratings by steering low achievers to alternative programs. In Orlando, Florida, the nation’s tenth-largest district, thousands of students who leave alternative charters run by a for-profit company aren’t counted as dropouts.

This story was co-published with USA Today.

https://www.propublica.org/article/alternative-education-using-charter-schools-hide-dropouts-and-game-system

Accelerated Learning Solutions (ALS), a more than $1.5 million-a-year “management fee,” 2015 financial records show — more than what the school spends on instruction.

alternative schools at times become warehouses where regular schools stow poor performers to avoid being held accountable.

Concerns that schools artificially boosted test scores by dumping low achievers into alternative programs have surfaced in connection with ongoing litigation in Louisiana and Pennsylvania, and echo findings from a legislative report a decade ago in California. The phenomenon is borne out by national data: While the number of students in alternative schools grew moderately over the past 15 years, upticks occurred as new national mandates kicked in on standardized testing and graduation rates.

The role of charter alternative schools like Sunshine — publicly funded but managed by for-profit companies — is likely to grow under the new U.S. Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos, an ardent supporter of school choice. In her home state of Michigan, charter schools have been responsible in part for a steep rise in the alternative school population. She recently portrayed Florida as a national model for charters and choice.

No Child Left Behind was supposed to improve educational outcomes for students long overlooked — including those who were black, Hispanic and low-income.

Nationwide, nearly a third of the alternative-school population attends a school that spends at least $500 less per pupil than regular schools do in the same district. Forty percent of school districts with alternative schools provide counseling services only in regular schools. Charter alternative schools — both virtual and bricks-and-mortar — in Ohio, Georgia and Florida have been accused of collecting public money for students who weren’t in classes.

Orlando schools are not unique in using alternative programs to remove struggling students from traditional classrooms. As far back as 2007, a legislative report in California warned that the state’s accountability system allowed traditional schools to shirk responsibility for low-performing students by referring them to alternative schools. The state is currently reviewing its standards for alternative schools.

Companies running schools in this niche often save costs by relying on computer programs that reduce the need for credentialed teachers. The market can be lucrative: As enrollment grew, ALS’ management fees from the schools it operates in Orange County more than doubled from $2.5 million in the 2012 school year to $5.4 million in 2015. The company says the fees pay for back-office services, such as human resources, as well as school-based support for areas such as curriculum, reading, math, security, and professional development.

The company’s affiliate — the controversial Nashville-based Community Education Partners, or CEP — contracted with school districts to serve students with behavior problems. The company, founded by a lawyer and Republican Party operative named Randle Richardson, ran schools for students who had committed disciplinary violations in cities such as Atlanta, Philadelphia, Houston and Orlando for more than a decade. Critics called CEP’s schools prison-like and dangerous, and charged that their academics were sub-par.

 

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more on charter schools in this blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=charter+schools

secretary of education

Statement by the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties

APSCUF is proud to be a founding member of the Campaign for the Future of Higher Education.

Posted by Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties on Monday, January 30, 2017

http://futureofhighered.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/CFHE-statement-on-DeVos-final.pdf 

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more on higher ed admin in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edad 

mobile learning tips

Tap into These 5 Tips for Mobile Learning

A master in mobile learning shares his best advice for rebooting your instruction.

By Dian Schaffhauser 12/13/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/13/tap-into-these-5-tips-for-mobile-learning.aspx

1) Find Out What Devices Are Really in Use

instructors have to take device choices into consideration when they’re choosing apps

2) Teach Not Just for Consumption but for Curation

Students use their phones to capture video or audio interviews and post them to Twitter’s live streaming service, Periscope, at various times throughout the course.

3) Try Texting for Exam Review

As an alternative, he began texting review questions every few hours for the next exam and found that he was getting a “much higher frequency of interaction.” Teacher Text, as he called it, never supplied the answers, just questions — sometimes multiple choice and other times open-ended. To keep students’ interest, he’d use at least a few of those questions on the actual test. “They’re going to be more inclined to pay attention to every question because I may give them 50 questions of review and have four or five of those on the test,” he said.

The result: “Grades started to climb pretty quickly.”

4) Perform Safe Texting, but Try It Everywhere

adopted remind from iKeepSafe, a free service that provides an interface between the teacher and the students for the purposes of texting. The tool has simplified the process of instructor texting, a practice that has overall helped students “to feel more connected.”

5) Fit Your Mobile Approach to Your Subject

[flashcard apps] like Quizlet and StudyBlue that can replicate the ongoing study or rehearsal of learning

might stream a quick lesson on the fly through Periscope or hold a 15-minute class discussion through a chat on Twitter.

“I’ll just say, ‘Here’s my hashtag, and I’m going to be live here at 9 to 9:15 p.m. Central time,'” he explained. He typically intends to broadcast a question about every five minutes and allow people to respond. “It’s interesting. You shoot out one question and you get bombarded. People are putting resources in there. In 15 minutes, I’ve barely gotten two questions off. But they have the hashtag and they can go back and harvest the resources that other people put up.”

6) Channel Your Students

Speak the language your learners listen in.’

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more on mobile learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

more on curation in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=curation

Finland Phenomenon reversed

When Finnish Teachers Work in America’s Public Schools

There are more restrictions to professional freedom in the United States, and the educators find the school day overly rigid.

Charles Rex Arbogast / AP

Timothy D. Walker

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/11/when-finnish-teachers-work-in-americas-public-schools/508685/

Muja concluded her response with a quote from one of Pasi Sahlberg’s articles for The Washington Post, “What if Finland’s great teachers taught in U.S. schools?”

Sahlberg, an education scholar and the author of Finnish Lessons 2.0, answers the theoretical question in his article’s title, writing in part: “I argue that if there were any gains in student achievement they would be marginal. Why? Education policies in Indiana and many other states in the United States create a context for teaching that limits (Finnish) teachers to use their skills, wisdom and shared knowledge for the good of their students’ learning.”

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more about Finland Phenomenon in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=finland+phenomenon

Save

student evals online courses

Discussion on the EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Group’s listserv

Question:

develop anonymous mid-course student evaluations allowing students to reflect on course and progress and informing instructor about what is working or not in the course.

Answers:

– what is working well for you in the course?
– what is not working well for you in the course?

krajewsk@AUGSBURG.EDU

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  • What is helping you learn?
  • What is hindering your learning?
  • What suggestions do you have to make the course better for you, your peers, or the instructor?

Katie Linder Research Director Extended Campus, Oregon State University 4943 The Valley Library Corvallis, Oregon 97331  Phone 541-737-4629 | Fax 541-737-2734 Email: kathryn.linder@oregonstate.edu

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At the University of Illinois, we have been using Informal Early Feedback as a way to gauge information from our students to help improve the courses before the end.  Here are a couple of links to our site. The first is the main page on what IEF is and the second is the question bank we offer to faculty. This is a starting point for them, then we meet with those who want to work on tweaking them for their specific needs.

* About IEF: https://citl.illinois.edu/citl-101/measurement-evaluation/teaching-evaluation/ief

* Question Bank: https://citl.illinois.edu/citl-101/measurement-evaluation/teaching-evaluation/ief/ief-question-bank

If you have any questions at all, don’t hesitate to ask.

Sol Roberts-Lieb Associate Director, Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning Pedagogy Strategy Team and Industry Liaison UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

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more on student evaluations in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=student+evaluation

facebook live

By October 10, 2016

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/4-ways-to-broadcast-on-facebook-live-that-fit-any-budget/

#1: Start With Your Smartphone Budget: Free!

If you go to the Facebook Live Map and browse the live feeds, you’ll often see people talking about nothing in particular, with unflattering close-up camera angles and scratchy audio. People often shift their phones from hand to hand when they tire of holding them, and brush the mic without realizing it.

#2: Invest in a Mobile Phone Setup Budget: $150-$300

iPhone Setup When choosing a mount for an iPhone, consider the iOgrapher ($60), shown below. Attach the 37mm wide angle lens ($40) if you want to get more people or surroundings in the video.
Android and Windows Phone Setup The Saramonic SmartMixer ($149) fits any phone (including the iPhone) and incorporates both audio and video stabilization in one piece of gear. The mics are stereo, and you can angle them however you want to capture multiple people talking.

#3: Broadcast From Your Desktop

Budget: Free-$600  Going live from your computer allows you to bring in guests to interview, add pre-recorded video, graphics, titles (so people know who the hosts are), and more.

You can use the built-in camera on your computer or a USB camera, like the Logitech C920 ($99).

OBS OBS (Open Broadcaster Software) is open-source software, which means it’s available for free.

OBS is a great option, but it doesn’t have all of the bells and whistles of paid software to make it intuitive or easy to use. You’ll need to do a bit of setup and testing before you go live.

Wirecast Wirecast ($495) has been around for years and has come a long way in the last few months as Facebook Live has exploded in popularity. The interface is a little more intuitive than OBS, but still requires some setup and experimentation.

#4: Build a Dedicated Studio Setup

Budget: $3,000-$30,000

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more on Facebook Live in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook+live

K12 platform presidential candidates

Here’s where Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stand on the biggest K-12 issues

By Stephen Noonoo
October 24th, 2016
more than 2,500 educators responded to an informal eSchool News poll asking which candidate best represented their vision for the future of K-12 education. (Clinton won that poll with 58 percent of the vote, while Trump received 28 percent; 12 percent were undecided.)
about the candidates and their positions on education, check out the infographic compiled by eCampus News, which hones in on higher education issues, such as college tuition costs.

W3Schools.com

presidential platform

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more on presidential election in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=election

online teaching

A Return to Best Practices for Teaching Online

10/25/16

https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2016/10/25/A-Return-to-Best-Practices-for-Teaching-Online.aspx

Judith Boettcher book, The Online Teaching Survival Guide (second edition, Jossey-Bass 2016). In chapter three, “Best Practices for Teaching Online: Ten Plus Four,” you and your co-author Rita-Marie Conrad provide a list of 14 best practices for teaching online. How can these best practices help faculty?

https://books.google.com/books?id=Z5PqDAAAQBAJ&lpg=PP1&dq=Boettcher%2C%20The%20Online%20Teaching%20Survival%20Guide&pg=PR9#v=onepage&q=Boettcher,%20The%20Online%20Teaching%20Survival%20Guide&f=false

when faculty are first asked to teach online, most do not have a lot of time to prepare. They are seldom given much coaching, mentoring, or support — often they are just kind of thrown into it,

Personalized learning means that while all students master core concepts, students ideally practice increasingly difficult use of those core concepts in contexts and settings desired by individual students.

The Learning Experiences Framework graphic

we really need to step up to much more effective use of rubrics. Rubrics can define intellectual outcomes in several key areas, such as critical thinking, for example.

great course design is at the core of creating great online learning experiences. We need to ensure that the desired learning outcomes, the course experiences, and the ways we gather evidences of learning are all congruent, one with the other. Course experiences should help students develop the knowledge and expertise that they desire, and the evidences of learning we require of students should be meaningful and purposeful and where possible, personalized and customized.

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

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