Archive of ‘teaching’ category

facebook live

By October 10, 2016

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/4-ways-to-broadcast-on-facebook-live-that-fit-any-budget/

#1: Start With Your Smartphone Budget: Free!

If you go to the Facebook Live Map and browse the live feeds, you’ll often see people talking about nothing in particular, with unflattering close-up camera angles and scratchy audio. People often shift their phones from hand to hand when they tire of holding them, and brush the mic without realizing it.

#2: Invest in a Mobile Phone Setup Budget: $150-$300

iPhone Setup When choosing a mount for an iPhone, consider the iOgrapher ($60), shown below. Attach the 37mm wide angle lens ($40) if you want to get more people or surroundings in the video.
Android and Windows Phone Setup The Saramonic SmartMixer ($149) fits any phone (including the iPhone) and incorporates both audio and video stabilization in one piece of gear. The mics are stereo, and you can angle them however you want to capture multiple people talking.

#3: Broadcast From Your Desktop

Budget: Free-$600  Going live from your computer allows you to bring in guests to interview, add pre-recorded video, graphics, titles (so people know who the hosts are), and more.

You can use the built-in camera on your computer or a USB camera, like the Logitech C920 ($99).

OBS OBS (Open Broadcaster Software) is open-source software, which means it’s available for free.

OBS is a great option, but it doesn’t have all of the bells and whistles of paid software to make it intuitive or easy to use. You’ll need to do a bit of setup and testing before you go live.

Wirecast Wirecast ($495) has been around for years and has come a long way in the last few months as Facebook Live has exploded in popularity. The interface is a little more intuitive than OBS, but still requires some setup and experimentation.

#4: Build a Dedicated Studio Setup

Budget: $3,000-$30,000

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more on Facebook Live in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook+live

K12 platform presidential candidates

Here’s where Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stand on the biggest K-12 issues

By Stephen Noonoo
October 24th, 2016
more than 2,500 educators responded to an informal eSchool News poll asking which candidate best represented their vision for the future of K-12 education. (Clinton won that poll with 58 percent of the vote, while Trump received 28 percent; 12 percent were undecided.)
about the candidates and their positions on education, check out the infographic compiled by eCampus News, which hones in on higher education issues, such as college tuition costs.

W3Schools.com

presidential platform

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more on presidential election in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=election

online teaching

A Return to Best Practices for Teaching Online

10/25/16

https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2016/10/25/A-Return-to-Best-Practices-for-Teaching-Online.aspx

Judith Boettcher book, The Online Teaching Survival Guide (second edition, Jossey-Bass 2016). In chapter three, “Best Practices for Teaching Online: Ten Plus Four,” you and your co-author Rita-Marie Conrad provide a list of 14 best practices for teaching online. How can these best practices help faculty?

https://books.google.com/books?id=Z5PqDAAAQBAJ&lpg=PP1&dq=Boettcher%2C%20The%20Online%20Teaching%20Survival%20Guide&pg=PR9#v=onepage&q=Boettcher,%20The%20Online%20Teaching%20Survival%20Guide&f=false

when faculty are first asked to teach online, most do not have a lot of time to prepare. They are seldom given much coaching, mentoring, or support — often they are just kind of thrown into it,

Personalized learning means that while all students master core concepts, students ideally practice increasingly difficult use of those core concepts in contexts and settings desired by individual students.

The Learning Experiences Framework graphic

we really need to step up to much more effective use of rubrics. Rubrics can define intellectual outcomes in several key areas, such as critical thinking, for example.

great course design is at the core of creating great online learning experiences. We need to ensure that the desired learning outcomes, the course experiences, and the ways we gather evidences of learning are all congruent, one with the other. Course experiences should help students develop the knowledge and expertise that they desire, and the evidences of learning we require of students should be meaningful and purposeful and where possible, personalized and customized.

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

badges blueprint

Supporting Student Engagement and Recognizing Learning With Digital Badges

Digital badges unify the learning that happens in these diverse contexts—often at a relatively granular level—with a common and portable representation of achievement.

Digital badges:

  • include a consistent set of metadata or information about the nature of the assessment, experience, or criteria that led to the skills or competency-based outcomes represented;
  • incorporate authentic evidence of the outcome being certified;
  • can be shared, displayed, or pulled into different kinds of platforms and environments in both human-readable and machine-readable formats;
  • can be distributed in a simple, consistent format, fostering relationship building, networking, and just-in-time career development opportunities;
  • are searchable and discoverable in a range of settings; and
  • offer data and insights about how and where they are used, valued, and consumed.

As a marker of achievement, a digital badge looks both backward and forward at the same time: backward to the experience or assessment that was completed to qualify for it, and forward to the benefits, rewards, or new opportunities available to those who have earned it.

Some of the possibilities you might consider include:

  • Serving as an alternate qualification for lifelong learning. Degrees and licenses certify summative achievements often following formal education programs or courses of study; do your digital badges provide official certification recognizing learning that is more granular, formative, or incremental?
  • Surfacing, verifying, or sharing evidence of achievement. How can we surface discrete evidence that certifies a skill or accomplishment, and by doing so arm learners with official recognition they can use toward new opportunities? Does validating and making a specific success or outcome more visible, portable, and sharable help a learner move successfully from one learning experience to the next?
  • Democratizing the process of issuing credit. How can we empower anyone who can observe or assess meaningful achievements to issue digital recognition of those accomplishments, even if that means that credential issuing becomes less centralized?
  • Exposing pathways and providing scaffolding. How can we better suggest or illuminate a path forward for learners while also enabling that pathway and progress to be shared with an external audience of peers or potential employers?
  • Supporting ongoing engagement. How can digital badges support learners incrementally as they progress through a learning experience? Can we enhance motivation before and after the experience?

The process for developing an effective badge system can be broken into steps:

  1. Create a badge constellation. A constellation is a master plan or blueprint that shows all of the badges you intend to offer and how they relate to core themes or to each other.
  2. Map meaning to each badge and to the overall badge system. Ensure that each part of your constellation has a value to the earner, to your organization, and to those who would reward or offer opportunities to bearers of each badge.
  3. Identify or develop an assessment strategy. How will you know when an earner is ready to receive a badge? Are existing assessments, observation opportunities, or measures already in place, or does your system require new ways to determine when an individual has qualified for a digital badge or credential? What activities or work will be assessed, and what evidence can accompany each issued badge?
  4. Determine relationships within the system and how learners progress. Is your plan one that shows progress, where components build on one another? How does one badge relate to another or stack to support ongoing personal or professional development?
  5. Incorporate benefits, opportunities, and rewards into the system. Work backwards from the benefits that will be available to those who earn badges in your system. Does each badge serve a greater purpose than itself? What doors does it unlock for earners? How will you communicate and promote the value of your badges to all constituents?
  6. Address technology considerations. How will you create and issue badges? Where and how will the badges be displayed or consumed by other systems and platforms in which they realize their potential value?
  7. Develop an appropriate graphic design. While the visual design is but one element of a badge rich with data, how an achievement is visually represented communicates a great deal of additional information. Digital badges offer a unique and powerful opportunity to market the skills and capabilities of those who complete your programs, and badges promote your initiatives as well as your organization and what it values.

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more on badges in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

over-achieving students ignored

Age-Based, Grade-Level System Ignores Huge Numbers of Over-Achieving Students

By Dian Schaffhauser 08/23/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/08/23/age-based-grade-level-system-ignores-huge-numbers-of-over-achieving-students.aspx

How Can So Many Students Be Invisible? Large Percentages of American Students Perform Above Grade Level,” produced in the Institute of Education Policy at Johns Hopkins University, examined data sets from five sources: the Common Core-based Smarter Balanced assessments in Wisconsin and California, Florida’s standards assessments, the Northwest Evaluation Association’s (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

between 15 percent and 45 percent of students enter elementary classrooms each fall learning above grade level. The result is that they’re not challenged enough in school, and teacher time and school resources are wasted in trying to teach them stuff they already know.

The entire report is available on the institute’s website. http://education.jhu.edu/edpolicy/commentary/PerformAboveGradeLevel

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more on gifted students in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gifted

Teacher Intentions to Integrate Technology in Education

Validating a Measure of Teacher Intentions to Integrate Technology in Education in Turkey, Spain and the USA

Serkan Perkmen, Balikesir University, Turkey ; Pavlo Antonenko, University of Florida, United States ; Alfonso Caracuel, Universidad de Granada, Spain

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 24, Number 2, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Chesapeake, VA

https://www.learntechlib.org/p/152244/

The majority of the participants were female. All of the participants were junior and senior students enrolled in elementary teacher education programs. Specifically, this study compared pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy, outcome expectations, intentions (internal factors) and perceived school climate (external factor) for technology integration in education in these countries.

Unlike Turkey and the US, self-efficacy predicted technology integration intention to a smaller degree than school climate in the Spanish sample. Interestingly, outcome expectations scores did not make a statistically significant contribution to predicting pre-service teachers’ intention to use technology in the US sample.

leadership in finland

Lessons From Finland: What Educators Can Learn About Leadership

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning 2016

This year we’d like to involve a wider segment of the teaching and learning community to help us design the survey.  Please join us online for one of two 30-minute discussion sessions:

Sept 14 at 12pm ET OR Sept 15 at 2pm ET
To join, just go to https://educause.acms.com/eliweb on the date and time of the session and join as a guest. No registration or login needed.

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Key Issues in Teaching and Learning 2016

http://www.educause.edu/eli/initiatives/key-issues-in-teaching-and-learning

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning 2016

1. Academic Transformation

3. Assessment of Learning

4. Online and Blended Learning

5. Learning Analytics

6. Learning Space Design

8. Open Educational Resources & Content

9. Working with Emerging Technology

10. Next Gen Digital Learning Environments (NGDLE) & Services

11. Digital & Informational Literacies

12. Adaptive Learning

13. Mobile Learning

14. Evaluating Tech-Based Instructional Innovations

15. Evolution of the Profession

fulbright opportunities

The Fulbright Scholar Program offers teaching, research or combination teaching and research awards in over 125 countries for the 2017-2018 academic year. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty and administrators as well as for professionals, independent scholars and many others.

This year, the Fulbright Scholar Program is offering over 95 awards in the field of Education. Opportunities include:

For additional awards in the field of education, please visit our discipline highlights webpage. There you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in education, as well as scholar testimonials which highlight the outcomes and benefits associated with completing a Fulbright Scholar grant.
For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link: http://cies.org/program/core-fulbright-us-scholar-program. You may also wish to explore our webinars or register with My Fulbright to receive exclusive program updates and application tips. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and the current competition will close on August 1, 2016.

Please contact Jennifer Bhiro at jbhiro@iie.org or reach any of our regional program staff for more information. We are happy to answer any questions you may have on applying.

The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world.

special and gifted education

Special and Gifted Education: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications (4 Volumes)

Release Date: April, 2016

Description

Diverse learners with exceptional needs require a specialized curriculum that will help them to develop socially and intellectually in a way that traditional pedagogical practice is unable to fulfill. As educational technologies and theoretical approaches to learning continue to advance, so do the opportunities for exceptional children.

Special and Gifted Education: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications is an exhaustive compilation of emerging research, theoretical concepts, and real-world examples of the ways in which the education of special needs and exceptional children is evolving. Emphasizing pedagogical innovation and new ways of looking at contemporary educational practice, this multi-volume reference work is ideal for inclusion in academic libraries for use by pre-service and in-service teachers, graduate-level students, researchers, and educational software designers and developers.

Topics Covered

  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism
  • Behavioral Disorders
  • Emotional Disorders
  • Exceptional Learners
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Physical Disabilities
  • Response to Intervention
  • Talented Education

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More on gifted education in this IMS blog:
more on special education in this IMS blog:

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