Archive of ‘badges’ category

blockchain credentialing

AAEEBL (The Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based learning) starts the Baston Blog

Blockchain Credentialing: What Impact Will it Have?
Posted By Trent Batson Ph. D.

blockchain credentialing, big news since the MIT Media Lab offered an open source means of credentialing using blockchain technology (the technology behind bitcoin).

Blockchain credentialing makes verification of credentials much simpler and less time consuming, according to the articles I’ve collected below.  Even IBM has entered the arena.

As with badges, we in the eportfolio world need to be aware of the trend toward blockchain credentialing.  I’ve sorted through the links below so I could select those I thought would be most useful for you. — the Phil Long interview

more on badges in this blog

badges blueprint

Supporting Student Engagement and Recognizing Learning With Digital Badges

Digital badges unify the learning that happens in these diverse contexts—often at a relatively granular level—with a common and portable representation of achievement.

Digital badges:

  • include a consistent set of metadata or information about the nature of the assessment, experience, or criteria that led to the skills or competency-based outcomes represented;
  • incorporate authentic evidence of the outcome being certified;
  • can be shared, displayed, or pulled into different kinds of platforms and environments in both human-readable and machine-readable formats;
  • can be distributed in a simple, consistent format, fostering relationship building, networking, and just-in-time career development opportunities;
  • are searchable and discoverable in a range of settings; and
  • offer data and insights about how and where they are used, valued, and consumed.

As a marker of achievement, a digital badge looks both backward and forward at the same time: backward to the experience or assessment that was completed to qualify for it, and forward to the benefits, rewards, or new opportunities available to those who have earned it.

Some of the possibilities you might consider include:

  • Serving as an alternate qualification for lifelong learning. Degrees and licenses certify summative achievements often following formal education programs or courses of study; do your digital badges provide official certification recognizing learning that is more granular, formative, or incremental?
  • Surfacing, verifying, or sharing evidence of achievement. How can we surface discrete evidence that certifies a skill or accomplishment, and by doing so arm learners with official recognition they can use toward new opportunities? Does validating and making a specific success or outcome more visible, portable, and sharable help a learner move successfully from one learning experience to the next?
  • Democratizing the process of issuing credit. How can we empower anyone who can observe or assess meaningful achievements to issue digital recognition of those accomplishments, even if that means that credential issuing becomes less centralized?
  • Exposing pathways and providing scaffolding. How can we better suggest or illuminate a path forward for learners while also enabling that pathway and progress to be shared with an external audience of peers or potential employers?
  • Supporting ongoing engagement. How can digital badges support learners incrementally as they progress through a learning experience? Can we enhance motivation before and after the experience?

The process for developing an effective badge system can be broken into steps:

  1. Create a badge constellation. A constellation is a master plan or blueprint that shows all of the badges you intend to offer and how they relate to core themes or to each other.
  2. Map meaning to each badge and to the overall badge system. Ensure that each part of your constellation has a value to the earner, to your organization, and to those who would reward or offer opportunities to bearers of each badge.
  3. Identify or develop an assessment strategy. How will you know when an earner is ready to receive a badge? Are existing assessments, observation opportunities, or measures already in place, or does your system require new ways to determine when an individual has qualified for a digital badge or credential? What activities or work will be assessed, and what evidence can accompany each issued badge?
  4. Determine relationships within the system and how learners progress. Is your plan one that shows progress, where components build on one another? How does one badge relate to another or stack to support ongoing personal or professional development?
  5. Incorporate benefits, opportunities, and rewards into the system. Work backwards from the benefits that will be available to those who earn badges in your system. Does each badge serve a greater purpose than itself? What doors does it unlock for earners? How will you communicate and promote the value of your badges to all constituents?
  6. Address technology considerations. How will you create and issue badges? Where and how will the badges be displayed or consumed by other systems and platforms in which they realize their potential value?
  7. Develop an appropriate graphic design. While the visual design is but one element of a badge rich with data, how an achievement is visually represented communicates a great deal of additional information. Digital badges offer a unique and powerful opportunity to market the skills and capabilities of those who complete your programs, and badges promote your initiatives as well as your organization and what it values.


more on badges in this blog

gradecraft is lms plus gaming

An LMS to Support ‘Gameful’ Learning

Seeking to bring the qualities of well-designed games to pedagogical assessment, the University of Michigan created a learning management system that uses gaming elements such as competition, badges and unlocks to provide students with a personalized pathway through their courses.

By David Raths 08/24/16

UM School of Information and School of Education

a new type of learning management system called GradeCraft. GradeCraft borrows game elements such as badges and unlocks to govern students’ progress through a course. With unlocks, for example, you have to complete a task before moving to the next level.

Written in Ruby on Rails and hosted on Amazon Web Services, GradeCraft was created by a small team of students and faculty with additional software support from Ann Arbor-based developer Alfa Jango. Their work received support from UM’s Office of Digital Education and Innovation and the Office of the Provost. GradeCraft can work as a stand-alone platform or in conjunction with a traditional LMS via the LTI (Learning Tools Interoperability) protocol.

Here is how it works: Instructors create a course shell within GradeCraft (similar to the process with any LMS). Students use a tool called the “Grade Predictor” to plan a personalized pathway through the course, making predictions about both what they will do and how they will perform. When assignments are graded, predictions turn into progress; students are then nudged to revisit their semester plan, reassessing what work is available and how well they need to do to succeed overall. Students are able to independently choose an assessment pathway that matches their interests within the framework of learning objectives for the course.


more on LMS in this blog

more on gaming in this blog

more on badges in this blog

convocation winter 2016

Short link the information below on the IMS blog: and even shorter one:

Weds 6th

Session I 10-11:15         Voyageurs North (Atwood)

Engage your students: connect CMS (D2L) to social media to enhance the learning process.

Plamen Miltenoff and Emil Towner

Join us online via Adobe Connect: (please login as a “guest” and use your real name)


In this rapid succession of examples, one can experience a showcase how to enhance students’ engagement by modernizing D2L experience through connection with social media. Bring your own examples and participate in a discussion, which aims finding the right tools for your class and field of study.

beginners to advanced

come with your own social media accounts: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine


By the end of this session, the participants will have an idea about peculiarity of each of the social media tools: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with the integration of each of the social media tool into D2L

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent each particular tool fits their field of study

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to compare the pedagogical advantages and disadvantages of the social media tools compared to D2L

Useful links to contact us via social media:
IMS blog:
IMS Facebook:
IMS Twitter:
IMS Pinterest:
IMS Instagram:
IMS YouTube:
IMS Google+:
IMS LinkedIn:

Plan – Plamen Miltenoff:

 Please consider the following survey about your opinion regarding social media in education:

please have the short link:

most recent contemplations about blogs and social media in general:

  • D2L and Vine
    Vine is a social media services, which provides the ability to share 7 sec videos. Vine is becoming more popular then Instagram (15 sec videos), with the simplicity to create short videos. Students can take sequence of short videos, which amount to 7 sec to reflect the main points of a project. E.g.: chemical reaction, biology dissection, progress of engineering planning, solving a math formula.
    URL to the vine can be posted in the D2L discussion area for further collaborative effort or for peers’ and instructions evaluation
    Vines are a click away from a FB group page or, with the right handle and hashtag, to a Twitter discussion
    The bottom-line to evaluate if fitting your field of study is: can the content be narrated or is it much better if visualized. If the latter, Vine can be your salvation.
    How to Create Social Videos With Your Smartphone
  • D2L and YouTube, EdPuzzle (, etc
    YouTube Unveils New Trending Tab

    Per SCSU IT disclaimer: MediaSpace (Kaltura) is a free, cloud-based video repository solution for campus that allows faculty and staff to upload and distribute video and audio content for academic or administrative purposes. Facilitators will discuss potential uses of MediaSpace for campus, demonst rate how to create Webcam and screen recordings, upload audio/video, and embed or link to MediaSpace content from D2L or a web site.  YouTube is owned by Google and the integration, including statistics and analytics by Google are way beyond MediaSpace. The only selling point of MediaSpace is the FERPA requirement by MnSCU to host privacy data on a MnSCU owned server
  • Google+
    Google+ is indirect competition with any CMS, D2L included, with its GOogle Classroom platform ( K12 and higher institutions are outsourcing to GMAIL and with Google Hangouts (Skype also), one can share video, audio and desktops, which makes Adobe Connect + D2L way behind in integration even before Google Drive is mentioned.
    Google Introduces Shared Albums in Google Photos:
    8 Ways to Use Google+ Hangouts for Your Business can record hangouts directly to your YouTube channel for future use.For private Google+ Hangouts, choose Google+ Video Hangouts, which allow you to have up to 10 participants in a video chat that is accessible only to the people invited.

Plan – Emil Towner:

  1. General stats on integrating social media and things to consider
  1. Integrating LinkedIn Assignments
  1. Integrating Facebook Groups
  • I will show a couple of groups that I have used
  • I can also come up with an “exercise” that participants can do, just let me know: (1) if you want me to and (2) if participants are suppose to have a Facebook account that they can log into during the session


Session K 2-3:15: 2PM Wed, Jan 8.  Location: CH455

Engage your students: gaming and gamification in the learning process.


As part of the broader discussion, a short discussion segment to form and agree on definitions and terms regarding games and gamification. Another short segment to seek consensus if this SCSU campus is ready to departure on the path of gamifying education. After several examples, of how games are used in education and gamification techniques, a discussion on how gaming and gamification can be streamlined amidst shrinking budget and increasing workload. More details and information about gaming and gamification at:

beginners to advanced


By the end of this session, the participants will have a working definitions on play, games, serious games, game-based learning, digital game-based learning, gaming, gamification and badges. (more at

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with the possibilities for integration of games in the educational process and for gamification of the educational process.

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent games and gamification fit their field of study



Friday 8th

Session M 10-11:15: CH 455

Present and be presented: engage your students with modern ways to share information


Two trends plague education: the swamp of PowerPoint presentations and the lack of visual literacy. In this rapid succession of examples, one can experience a showcase of various cloud-based tools, which brings visual presentations way beyond PowerPoint and align with the Millennials demand for current social interaction. A discussion on how relevant these tools are to various disciplines and details on improving the interaction among instructors and students during the presentation. Ongoing discussion about design as part of visual literacy and the difference between blended learning and technology integration.

beginners to advanced


By the end of this session, the participants will have understand the movement “Death by PowerPoint” and will understand the advantage of cloud-based presentation tools to MS PowerPoint

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with several tools, which successfully replace PowerPoint and well beyond.

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent games and gamification fit their field of study

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to discriminate between technology integration and blended learning.



mobile technology, badges, flipped classrooms, and learning analytics according to Bryan Alexander

Very short video of Bryan Alexander, senior fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education, discussing the issues and opportunities facing mobile technology, badges, flipped classrooms, and learning analytics: