Archive of ‘technology’ category

your social media account cracked

This is what happens when someone hacks your Spotify account

quizzes for practice and training

Five Types of Quizzes That Deepen Engagement with Course Content

By:

Tropman, E., (2014). In defense of reading quizzes. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 26 (1), 140-146.

Brame, C. J. and Biel, R., (2015). Test-enhanced learning: The potential for testing to promote greater learning in undergraduate science courses. Cell Biology Education—Life Sciences Education, 14 (Summer), 1-12.

Collaborative quizzing
Quizzing with resources
Quizzing after questioning
Online quizzes completed before class

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Top Five Tips for Creating Training Quizzes

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More on the use of quizzes as a conversation starter and/or training tool (versus assessment tool) in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2012/11/28/quizzes-and-fun-games-gamification/

student-centered learning literature review

resources on student-centered learning and the use of rubrics, multimedia, social media to personalize and engage learners

WHAT:
what is student-centered learning:
Student-centered learning, also known as learner-centered education, broadly encompasses methods of teaching that shift the focus of instruction from the teacher to the student. In original usage, student-centered learning aims to develop learner autonomy and independence [1] by putting responsibility for the learning path in the hands of students.[2][3][4] Student-centered instruction focuses on skills and practices that enable lifelong learning and independent problem-solving.[5] Student-centered learning theory and practice are based on the constructivist learning theory that emphasizes the learner’s critical role in constructing meaning from new information and prior experience. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Student-centred_learning

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Student-centered learning moves students from passive receivers of information to active participants in their own discovery process. What students learn, how they learn it and how their learning is assessed are all driven by each individual student’s needs and abilities.

At the system level, this requires implementing curriculum planning practices, pedagogy and assessment methods that support a student-centric approach. In the classroom, teachers craft instruction and apply technology in a way that best serves each student’s learning journey. Technology use is always guided by two primary criteria:

  1. What’s appropriate for the task at hand?
  2. How can activities be designed to develop higher-order thinking skills?

http://www.iste.org/standards/essential-conditions/student-centered-learning

Why is it important?

When students take responsibility for their own learning, they become explorers capable of leveraging their curiosity to solve real-world problems. To that end, the ISTE Standards guide teachers toward designing learning experiences that permit student independence and foster lifelong learning.

Technology allows for an unprecedented level of personalized learning, with valuable opportunities to monitor progress and engagement, follow student thinking, and digitally assess competencies. When schools effectively leverage both technology and pedagogy, both students and teachers become empowered to make decisions about their own learning and teaching.

True student-centered learning requires more than just an increase in technology implementation. It represents a shift in the educational culture toward a system that supports technology for standards-based learning and real-world problem solving. As a system transitions to a student-centered approach, educators can more effectively apply technology to improve learning outcomes and help students develop the skills for college and career readiness.

http://www.iste.org/standards/essential-conditions/student-centered-learning

HOW:

student-centered learning is including different methods, such as:

  • active learning.
  • cooperative learning.
  • inductive teaching and learning.
  • minimizing or eliminating student resistance to student-centered teaching methods.
  • Links to relevant web sites.

The University of Minnesota Cooperative Learning Center.

http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Student-Centered.html

  • personalized learning
  • anytime anywhere learning

http://edglossary.org/student-centered-learning/

student-centered learning through assessment : create the right rubrics

#2 from http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2013/12/24/ctq_powell_strengths.html

Steffens, K. (2014). E-rubrics to facilitate self-regulated learning. Revista De Docencia Universitaria, 12(1), 11-12.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d96263668%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Rejab, M. M., Awang, I. b., Hassan, S. b., & Ahmad, M. b. (2010). Customizable Rubrics Model for Formative Evaluation of Problem-Based Learning Course. Annual International Conference On Infocomm Technologies In Competitive Strategies, 126-131. doi:10.5176/978-981-08-7240-3_I-51

CORLU, M. S. (2013). Insights into STEM Education Praxis: An Assessment Scheme for Course Syllabi.Educational Sciences: Theory & Practice, 13(4), 2477-2485. doi:10.12738/estp.2013.4.1903

Ma, A. W. (2009). A Longitudinal Study of the Use of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Promoting Lifelong Learning Skills. Issues In Informing Science & Information Technology, 665-86.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d44457533%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Klein, G. C., & Carney, J. M. (2014). Comprehensive Approach to the Development of Communication and Critical Thinking: Bookend Courses for Third- and Fourth-Year Chemistry Majors. Journal Of Chemical Education,91(10), 1649-1654. doi:10.1021/ed400595j

Moore, T. J., Guzey, S. S., Roehrig, G. H., Stohlmann, M., Park, M. S., Kim, Y. R., & … Teo, H. J. (2015). Changes in Faculty Members’ Instructional Beliefs while Implementing Model-Eliciting Activities. Journal Of Engineering Education, 104(3), 279-302. doi:10.1002/jee.20081

student-centered learning through engagement and buy-in: engage with multimedia

More on student centered learning in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=student+centered+learning&submit=Search

student-centered learning through engagement and buy-in: engage with social media

#3 from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/five-characteristics-of-learner-centered-teaching/

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Attard, A., Di lorio Emma, Geven, K., & Santa, R. (2010, October). Student-Centred Learning Toolkit for students, staff and higher education institutions. Education International. Retrieved from http://pascl.eu/wp-content/uploads/SCL_toolkit_ESU_EI.pdf

MOOC and peer pressure

reference bias in peer assessment. MOOCs

Rogers, T., & Feller, A. (2016). Discouraged by Peer Excellence: Exposure to Exemplary Peer Performance Causes Quitting. Psychological Science, 27(3), 365–374. http://doi.org/10.1177/0956797615623770
exposure to exemplary peer performances can undermine motivation and success by causing people to perceive that they cannot attain their peers’ high levels of performance. It also causes de-identification with the relevant domain.

http://www.wired.com/insights/2014/08/moocs-are-dead-long-live-the-mooc/

pedagogy can be easily overlooked for convenience or cost.

as educators I think it is in our best interest to realize that just because one modality provides better instructional or assessment models than another, doesn’t mean people won’t sacrifice out of need. As my favorite boss used to say, products and services are all about Time, Money, and Quality… pick two. Progress updates work.

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Piech, C., Huang, J., Chen, Z., Do, C., Ng, A., & Koller, D. (n.d.). tuningPeerGrading.pdf. Retrieved March 25, 2016, from http://web.stanford.edu/~cpiech/bio/papers/tuningPeerGrading.pdf

value rubrics

Connecting the Dots
Assessing Student Work Using the VALUE Rubrics
1:00 – 4:00
In this session, we will focus on assessing student work using the VALUE Rubrics.
Together, we will look at common work samples from students at different points in
their academic trajectory. We will identify evidence of critical thinking, quantitative
literacy, written communication, and civic engagement from those samples.
We will then connect that evidence to the appropriate domains and levels on
the VALUE rubrics. And we will consider the implications of what we learn for
our own practice in the classroom.

my notes

viewer people than i expected.

group work, our group was charged with connecting the dots: assessing student work using the value rubrics

written communication value rubric

 

university web page

Posted in LinkedIn by Jonathan Moser

Check Out Thayer Academy’s new site: from Camps and Campus Maps to Infographics, History, and even some Digital Storytelling:

Home: http://www.thayer.org/
Camp Thayer: https://lnkd.in/e6CVMmk
Campus Map: https://lnkd.in/eu9aUGm
History of Thayer: https://lnkd.in/eSzgEbr
Facts & Figures: https://lnkd.in/eH_F6za

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see also
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/03/23/library-social-media-strategy/

 

rubrics and grade appeals

Using Rubrics as a Defense Against Grade Appeals

, March 21st, 2016

Rubrics provide the criteria for assessing students’ work. Giving students the rubric along with the assignment can clarify the instructor’s expectations. A rubric allows for much quicker, fairer, and more transparent grading. After an instructor grades 30 essays, fairness can become secondary to exhaustion. Following the rubric takes less time, and doing so allows grading the first essay to look exactly like grading the last essay. Students will be less likely to say, for example, “She got a 3 on this section, and I got a 2 for almost the same content.”

more on rubrics in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=rubrics&submit=Search

tech lib conference 2016

http://2016libtechconference.sched.org/event/69f9/come-on-down-gaming-in-the-flipped-classroom#

avatar for Angie Cox

Angie Cox

Instruction and Liaison Librarian, University of Northern Iowa
games and gamification. the semantics are important. using the right terms can be crucial in the next several years.

gamification for the enthusiasm. credit course with buffet. the pper-to-peer is very important

gaming types

affordability; east to use; speed to create.

assessment. if you want heavy duty, SPSS kind of assessment, use polldaddy or polleverywhere.
Kahoot only Youtube, does not allow to upload own video or use Kaltura AKA Medispace, text versus multimedia
Kahoot is replacing Voicethread at K12, use the wave

Kahoot allows to share the quizzes and surveys
Kahoot is not about assessment, it is not about drilling knowledge, it is about conversation starter. why do we read an article? there is no shame in wrong answer.

the carrot: when they reach the 1000 points, they can leave the class

Kahoot music can be turned off, how short, the answers are limited like in Twitter

Quizlet

screenshot their final score and reach 80%

gravity is hard, scatter start with. auditory output

drill game

Teach Challenge.

1st day is Kahoot, second day is Team challange and test

embed across the curriculum

gaming toolkit for campus

 

what to take home: have students facing students from differnt library

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http://sched.co/69f2

Putting it all together: a holistic approach to utilizing your library’s user data for making informed web design decisions 

In the age of Big Data, there is an abundance of free or cheap data sources available to libraries about their users’ behavior across the many components that make up their web presence. Data from vendors, data from Google Analytics or other third-party tracking software, and data from user testing are all things libraries have access to at little or no cost. However, just like many students can become overloaded when they do not know how to navigate the many information sources available to them, many libraries can become overloaded by the continuous stream of data pouring in from these sources. This session will aim to help librarians understand 1) what sorts of data their library already has (or easily could have) access to about how their users use their various web tools, 2) what that data can and cannot tell them, and 3) how to use the datasets they are collecting in a holistic manner to help them make design decisions. The presentation will feature examples from the presenters’ own experience of incorporating user data in decisions related to design the Bethel University Libraries’ web presence.

http://tinyurl.com/jbchapf

data tools: user testing, google analytics, click trakcer vendor data

  1. user testing, free, no visualization, cross-domain, easy to use, requires scripts
    qualitative q/s : why people do what they do and how will users think about your content
    3 versions: variables: options on book search and order/wording of the sections in the articles tab
    Findings: big difference between tabs versus single-page. Lil difference btw single-page options. Take-aways it won’t tell how to fix the problem, how to be empathetic how the user is using the page
    Like to do in the future: FAQ and Chat. Problem: low use. Question how to make it be used (see PPT details)
  2. Crazy Egg – Click Trackers. not a free tool, lowest tier, less $10/m.
    see PPT for details>
    interaction with the pates, clicks and scrollings
  3. scroll analytics
    not easy to use, steep learning curve
    “blob” GAnalytics recognize the three different domains that r clicked through as one.
  4. vendor data: springshare
    chat and FAQ
    Libguides

questions:

is there a dashboard tool that can combine all these tools?
optimal workshop: reframe, but it is more about qualitative data.
how long does it take to build this? about two years in general, but in the last 6 months focused.

artificial-intelligence engine https://www.technologyreview.com/s/600984/an-ai-with-30-years-worth-of-knowledge-finally-goes-to-work/,
Doug Lenat

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