InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

DPLA aggregation webinar

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 22, 2015

DPLA aggregation webinar

https://global.gotowebinar.com/join/561128425722875393/722195006

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)

Open Archives Initiative, OAI http://www.openarchives.org/

DSpace http://www.dspace.org/

XSLT http://www.w3schools.com/xsl/

Heather Gilbert and Tyler Mobley from the South Carolina Digital Library
http://scmemory.org

Metadata schema and elements: required, recommended, optional.
required: e.g., contributing institution, date digital, digitization

one central hub as aggregate and 3 other hubs to collect, scan etc.
use ofTab-separated values TSV, http://www.json.org/ JavaScript Object Notation JSON, OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications  ODF

Tyson Mobley:
OCLC multi-site server, aggragated Blacklight catalog –

Project Blacklight :: Blacklight (open source)
Apache Solr – java based search index. highly scalable

complications: multiple metadata formats, but variations of Dublin core.
Solr is not a relational dbase, so management of separate partners’ records in a single Solr index was issue to make it relational.

Gretchen Gueguen
Data Services Coordinator from DPLA
metadata mapping
aggregates data from libraries, archives, museums etc
Content hubs and services hubs (so LRS at SCSU)

For q/s:

http://tiny.cc/ncdpla

https://github.com/ncdhc/dpla-submission-precheck
https://github.com/ncdhc/dpla-sample-repox-xslt
https://goo.gl/ujzZHS

Metadata is basis of the work of DPLA. We rely on a growing network of hubs that aggregate metadata from partners, then we, in turn, aggregate the hubs’ metadata into the DPLA datastore. As we continue to grow our hub network, we have found the practical matter of how to aggregate partner metadata and deal with quality control over the resulting aggregated set becomes our biggest challenge. If your organization is interested in becoming a part of the DPLA network, or if you are interested in how the DPLA works with metadata, we will be hosting a webinar on January 22nd, at 2pm Eastern, about our workflows, and our future development in this area. The webinar will examine the aggregation best practices at two of our DPLA Service Hubs, as the basis of a conversation about metadata aggregation practices among our Hubs. In addition, DPLA has been working on some new tools for metadata aggregation and quality control that we’d like to share. We’ll preview some of our plans and hope to get feedback on future directions. Speakers: Lisa Gregory and Stephanie Williams of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center Heather Gilbert and Tyler Mobley of the South Carolina Digital Library Gretchen Gueguen of DPLA

 

Posted in Digital literacy, Library and information science, media literacy, search, technology literacy | Tagged: , , , , , , , | No Comments »

AI

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 20, 2015

The Deep Mind of Dennis Hassabis

In the race to recruit the best AI talent, Google scored a coup by getting the team led by a former video game guru and chess prodigy

https://medium.com/backchannel/the-deep-mind-of-demis-hassabis-156112890d8a

the only path to developing really powerful AI would be to use this unstructured information. It’s also called unsupervised learning— you just give it data and it learns by itself what to do with it, what the structure is, what the insights are.

One of the people you work with at Google is Geoff Hinton, a pioneer of neural networks. Has his work been crucial to yours?

Sure. He had this big paper in 2006 that rejuvenated this whole area. And he introduced this idea of deep neural networks—Deep Learning. The other big thing that we have here is reinforcement learning, which we think is equally important. A lot of what Deep Mind has done so far is combining those two promising areas of research together in a really fundamental way. And that’s resulted in the Atari game player, which really is the first demonstration of an agent that goes from pixels to action, as we call it.

Posted in gaming, information technology, video | Tagged: , , | No Comments »

Technology Fails To Revolutionize Education

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 18, 2015

Why Technology Fails To Revolutionize Education

http://www.wimp.com/failseducation/

Posted in instructional technology, learning, technology, technology literacy | Tagged: | No Comments »

NOISETRADE vs BANDCAMP vs SOUNDCLOUD

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 15, 2015

Use social media sites for audio with learning goals in mind? No problem, contribute to this blog entry…

NOISETRADE vs BANDCAMP vs SOUNDCLOUD

http://forum.holyculture.net/showthread.php?63700-NOISETRADE-vs-BANDCAMP-vs-SOUNDCLOUD-vs-Whoever

Bandcamp vs. ReverbNation vs. SoundCloud: Part Three

http://doughnutmag.com/tutorials/music-promotion/bandcamp-vs-reverbnation-vs-soundcloud-part-three/

Lessons Learned From Noisetrade: Free and Legal Music Downloads

http://readwrite.com/2012/01/03/lessons-learned-from-noisetrad

 

When it comes to downloading digital music, there is free and then there is legal, but seldom can you have both from the same site, and make money too.

Posted in Digital literacy, educational technology, instructional technology, learning objects, open learning, social media | Tagged: , , , , , | No Comments »

Games in the library

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 13, 2015

Games in the library

bibliography and research

http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/index.html

Playing in the Past: A History of Games, Toys, and Puzzles in North American Libraries
Author(s): Scott Nicholson
Source: The Library Quarterly, Vol. 83, No. 4 (October 2013), pp. 341-361
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/671913

demonstrate the different ways in which libraries have used games, toys, and puzzles over the last 150 years through bothcollections and services
p, 342 Defining games -
p. 348 Games as the Subject of Collections\
p. 350A significant shift in academic libraries is a focus on providing services to students. Since agrowing number of academic publications both current issues and back volumes

are ac-cessible online through library subscriptions, the physical space of academic libraries is notneeded for collections of periodicals. The concept of the “learning commons”has become
popular on US campuses in the past decade; it combines traditional library resources and
the availability of library staff members with group work spaces, computer access and assis-
tance, and writing assistance to provide one place where students can get assistance with
course work. In addition, many of these learning commons also include cafes, social spaces,
and other support of the social lives of students, and it is in this role that academic libraries
provide access to collections of games.

p. 357 Another upcoming area of gaming in libraries is gamification. Gamification is the application of game design elements to a nongame setting ðDeterding et al. 2011Þ.

————————————-

Nicholson, S. (2013, June). Exploring Gamification Techniques for Classroom Management. Paper Presented at Games+Learning+Society 9.0, Madison, WI

The concept of meaningful gamification is that the primary use of game layers is not to provide
external rewards, but rather to help participants find a deeper connection to the underyling topic

——————————-

 

More on games in education in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

Posted in educational technology, gamification, gaming | Tagged: , | No Comments »

Mobile Learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 13, 2015

Mobile Learning Futures

http://dmlcentral.net/blog/s-craig-watkins/mobile-learning-futures

when Latinos and African Americans go online from home they are most likely doing so via a handheld device.

More on mobile learning in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=mobile+learning

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VSCO Cam

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 12, 2015

How To Use The App That Will Make Your Photos Look So Much Better

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-use-vsco-cam-2015-1?op=1#ixzz3OeN3Fss0

VSCO Cam available for mobile devices

VSCO Cam allows users to transform bland photos into gallery-worthy artistic images.

Posted in Digital literacy, information technology, instructional technology, mobile learning, social media, technology, technology literacy | Tagged: , , , | No Comments »

instaGrok: An Education Search Engine

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 12, 2015

instaGrok: An Education Search Engine for Students

http://www.edudemic.com/instagrok-an-education-search-engine-for-students

instaGrok is a next-generation research engine intended for academic settings to allow students to research any subject and see results in an interactive concept map, or “grok.” The grok features key facts, concepts and their relationships, images, videos, quizzes, and a glossary. Students can pin the information that they want to use to their grok and keep a bibliography or research notes in an integrated journal.

What makes instaGrok indispensable to teachers is its ability to facilitate self-directed learning of several critical skills, including researching and integrating discrete concepts.

My note: App for Android and iOS tablets is NOT available for smartphones and iTouch

Posted in Android, Digital literacy, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, iPAD, mobile apps, pedagogy, search, student-centered learning | Tagged: , , | No Comments »

Internet of Things and Its Legal Challenges

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 12, 2015

What’s The “Internet of Things” and What Are Its Legal Challenges?

http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/whats-the-internet-of-things-and-what-48378/

Here are some interesting legal issues and challenges posed by the Internet of Things.

Device Malfunctions.

Data Protection. 

Evolving Regulations. 

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social media by the 19 years old

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on January 11, 2015

A Teenager Finally Explains What Adults Just Don’t Get About Facebook, Instagram, And Snapchat

https://medium.com/backchannel/a-teenagers-view-on-social-media-1df945c09ac6

http://www.businessinsider.com/what-teenagers-think-of-social-media-2015-1#ixzz3OYAq8JC2

Facebook: awkward family dinner party we can’t really leave
Tweeter: a lot of us simply do not understand the point of Twitter. There is always a core group at every school that uses it very religiously to tweet and another group that uses it to simply watch or retweet, but besides that many don’t use it.
Tumblr: is where you are your true self and surround yourself (through who you follow) with people who have similar interests. It’s often seen as a “judgment-free zone” where, due to the lack of identity on the site, you can really be who you want to be.
Instagram: “Everything about the application makes it less commercialized and more focused on the content, meaning more teens are inclined to visit it.
Twitter: “To be honest, a lot of us simply do not understand the point of Twitter.”
Snapchat: “Snapchat has a lot less social pressure attached to it compared to every other popular social media network out there.
Tumblr: “Tumblr is where you are your true self and surround yourself (through who you follow) with people who have similar interests. 
Yik Yak: People reference Yaks all the time with each other or send screenshots

  • LinkedIn — We have to get it, so we got it. Many wait until college to get this (as they probably should, it isn’t for this demographic anyways).
  • Pinterest—It’s mainly female-dominated and is for those who have an artsy/hipster focus. Not too many people talk about it.
  • Kik—It’s a messaging application that is mainly used for messaging people on Twitter I guess? I don’t know anyone who uses it. The only time I ever hear this application is for the joke, “Aye you got Kik?”, normally seen as someone trying to “spit game” to attract a partner. It’s really difficult for me to describe it here but it isn’t super relevant.
  • WhatsApp—You download it when you go abroad, you use it there for a bit before going back to iMessage and Facebook Messenger, then you delete it.
  • GroupMe—By far the most used group messaging application in college.

 

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