InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Fusking

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 13, 2015

Fusking = using a program to extract files names from a website that would seem obvious. Like 1.jpg, 2.jpg, etc. http://fusking.urbanup.com/3995415#.VVNxIdIMi54.

How hackers built software to steal naked photos from hundreds of women automatically

The Dark Art Of “Fusking”

http://www.buzzfeed.com/katienotopoulos/the-dark-art-of-fusking

Fusking: Photobucket Fights Back Against Peeping Toms, Sends Takedown Notice To Reddit Pages

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/16/fusking-photobucket-takedown-notice-reddit_n_1792472.html

Posted in digital citizenship, digital identity, Digital literacy, technology literacy | Tagged: , , | No Comments »

Instructional Design

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 13, 2015

7 Things You Should Know About Developments in Instructional Design

http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/7-things-you-should-know-about-developments-instructional-design

Please read the entire EducCause article here: eli7120

discussion of IMS with faculty:

  • pedagogical theories
  • learning outcome
  • design activities
  • students’ multimedia assignments, which lead to online resources
  • collaboration with other departments for the students projects
  • moving the class to online environment (even if kept hybrid)

What is it?

the complexity of the learning environment is turning instructional design into a more dynamic activity, responding to changing educational models and expectations. Flipped classrooms, makerspaces, and competency-based learning are changing how instructors work with students, how students work with course content, and how mastery is verified. Mobile computing, cloud computing, and data-rich repositories have altered ideas about where and how learning takes place.

How does it work?

One consequence of these changes is that designers can find themselves filling a variety of roles. Today’s instructional designer might work with subject-matter experts, coders, graphic designers, and others. Moreover, the work of an instructional designer increasingly continues throughout the duration of a course rather than taking place upfront.

Who’s doing it?

The responsibility for designing instruction traditionally fell to the instructor of a course, and in many cases it continues to do so. Given the expanding role and landscape of technology—as well as the growing body of knowledge about learning and about educational activities and assessments— dedicated instructional designers are increasingly common and often take a stronger role.

Why is it significant?

The focus on student-centered learning, for example, has spurred the creation of complex integrated learning environments that comprise multiple instructional modules. Competency-based learning allows students to progress at their own pace and finish assignments, courses, and degree plans as time and skills permit. Data provided by analytics systems can help instructional designers predict which pedagogical approaches might be most effective and tailor learning experiences accordingly. The use of mobile learning continues to grow, enabling new kinds of learning experiences.

What are the downsides?

Given the range of competencies needed for the position, finding and hiring instructional designers who fit well into particular institutional cultures can be challenging to the extent that instructors hand over greater amounts of the design process to instructional designers, some of those instructors will feel that they are giving up control, which, in some cases, might appear to be simply the latest threat to faculty authority and autonomy. My note: and this is why SCSU Academic Technology is lead by faculty not IT staff. 

Where is it going?

In some contexts, instructional designers might work more directly with students, teaching them lifelong learning skills. Students might begin coursework by choosing from a menu of options, creating their own path through content, making choices about learning options, being more hands-on, and selecting best approaches for demonstrating mastery. Educational models that feature adaptive and personalized learning will increasingly be a focus of instructional design. My note: SCSU CETL does not understand instructional design tendencies AT ALL. Instead of grooming faculty to assume the the leadership role and fill out the demand for instructional design, it isolates and downgrades (keeping traditional and old-fashioned) instructional design to basic tasks of technicalities done by IT staff.

What are the implications for teaching and learning?

By helping align educational activities with a growing understanding of the conditions,
tools, and techniques that enable better learning, instructional designers can help higher education take full advantage of new and emerging models of education. Instructional
designers bring a cross-disciplinary approach to their work, showing faculty how learning activities used in particular subject areas might be effective in others. In this way, instructional
designers can cultivate a measure of consistency across courses and disciplines in how educational strategies and techniques are incorporated. Designers can also facilitate the
creation of inclusive learning environments that offer choices to students with varying strengths and preferences.

More on instructional design in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/13/instructional-design/

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Education in the Digital Age

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 12, 2015

Education in the Digital Age

http://forum.academica.ca/articles/2015/4/29/written-by-bob-gillett

commentary from Bob Gillett. It was recently submitted to The Conference Board of Canada as part of the work of the Centre for Skills and Post-Secondary Education.  

 

Posted in Blog, digital citizenship, distance learning, distributive learning, Millennials, mobile learning | Tagged: | No Comments »

posters

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 12, 2015

Posters, Images and Metaphors

http://cristinaskybox.blogspot.fr/2012/09/posters-images-and-metaphors.html

offers excellent choice of digital tools for end solutions such as signage and other electronic posters.

This blog has entries with wide variety of presentation solutions:

Thttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=presentations

Posted in Digital literacy, instructional technology | Tagged: , , , , | No Comments »

review games: What2Learn

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 12, 2015

What2Learn – Create Your Own Review Games

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2015/05/what2learn-create-your-own-review-games.html
What2Learn is a site offering lots of review games on topics in math, science, social studies, and language arts. Most of the games are of the question and answer variety. Students can play the games without registering on the site.

Posted in gamification, gaming | Tagged: | No Comments »

Social Media Images

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 12, 2015

How to Create Social Media Images That Connect With Your Audience

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-create-social-media-images-that-connect-with-your-audience

#1: Create Impact With Company Screenshots

#2: Share Interesting Facts With Infographics

#3: Get Personal With Behind-the-Scenes Shots

#4: Stimulate the Imagination With Action Shots

#5: Inspire With Quote Graphics

#6: Be Unique With Original Designs

#7: Experiment With Different Color Palettes and Fonts

 

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Bluepulse

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 11, 2015

I am including a couple whitepapers you can review and forward to all staff who may be curious about our teaching and learning tool and would be attending the demo on May 11th at 1.00pm

Please see the go to meeting instructions for our Bluepulse v1.5 walkthrough.

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/822849653

United States: +1 (312) 757-3126

Access Code: 822-849-653

As you mentioned faculty may be very interested in using Bluepulse, I wanted to include the link for our instructor video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgdpQT3jkBQ&feature=youtu.be

If you have any questions about the integration, training or implementation, please do not hesitate to email or call and as always I am more than happy to help.

Warm regards,

Nick Sankar

Bluepulse Account Manager

MY NOTES:

http://www.explorance.com/

harvest students; feedback – anonymous way to ask questions. D2L surveys offer already this opportunity; Twitter and other the free options for polling apps give the same option, e.g. Polleverywhere gives a word cloud option

the follow up q/n as demonstrated is limited to 160 characters. Why?

i like that it compartmentalize the anonymity but I really ask myself: would SCSU faculty go to such length?

presumptions: non-tenured faculty is interested in the top layers students and wants to find out what works for them best. this loaded, since, if there ARE different learning styles, then what worked for the top layer might be exactly what did not work for the bottom layer, but this approach will gave the faculty a justification to keep stratifying students, instead of thinking of diverse ways to approach all layers. this part of sale, not pedagogy. sorry.

weakness; the entire presentation is trying to sell a product, which might be good for different campus, but not for SCSU, where faculty are overworked, the class load is so great that going to such details might be questionable.

exporting CSV for data massaging is not big deal. indeed the easy of this particular software is admirable, but if the faculty has time to go into such details, they can export the data from D2L or Google Forms and open it in SPSS

Greg’s question: mobility.

libraries and services. pole users without being tied to course. again, that all can be done with other services in the library. if the library cares about it at all.

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educational resources

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 11, 2015

Guide to the Best Homeschooling and Unschooling Resources

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/17/guide-to-the-best-homeschooling-and-unschooling-resources/

* Khanacademy.org

* Hippocampus.org

* Free online college courses can be found on many sites, with directories available at sites like MIT’s Open Coursework Consortium. Big players in the open-educational resources movement include Coursera and EdX, which offer MOOCs. FutureLearn is UK-based, with free online courses from UK and international universities. More information about these can be found in MindShift’s guide to free quality higher education, plusprevious collections of open educational sites and resources.

* iTunes University

* Audiobooks Free public-domain audiobooks, read by volunteers, can be found at librivox.org. (Print versions of public-domain books are available at Project Gutenberg.)

 

 

 

Posted in Digital literacy, distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, ebook, hybrid learning, information technology, instructional technology, mobile learning, student-centered learning | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Inquiry Learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 11, 2015

Why Inquiry Learning is Worth the Trouble

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/01/29/what-does-it-take-to-fully-embrace-inquiry-learning/

EduCon 2.5

it’s important to question whether alleged “personalized,” “project-based,” or “collaborative” learning efforts are actually helping students and teachers to “hold ourselves in a state of questioning.”

In a true inquiry-based model, how learning happens isn’t as important as whether that learning encourages students to try to learn even more.

“Inquiry means living in the soup. Inquiry means living in that uncomfortable space where we don’t know the answer.”

Increased collaboration between students and increasing student scrutiny of educational content were two other signs Lehmann and the group said signaled the right approach, even if they clashed with classroom norms. For example, collaboration can often lead to tricky discussions about what part of a students’ work are his or her own and what part is recycled. (see IMS blog entry on academic dishonesty: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/05/04/cheating-inadvertently/)

Inquiry-based education should improve student engagement, critical thinking skills, and cross-disciplinary opportunities (see IMS blog entry on cross-disciplinary idea and subjects versus topics equivalent http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/24/education-reform-finland/)

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Videos In Your Classroom

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on May 8, 2015

Seven Steps for Creating Videos In Your Classroom

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2015/05/seven-steps-for-creating-videos-in-your.html

On page 76 of Invent To Learn Stager and Martinez write, “The movie can be done without a storyboard or script, the 3D object may not be the most precisely planned out, but the point is to create something that can be shared and talked about.”

video

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