InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Flipped Lessons Through EDPuzzle: How to Create & Distribute

Posted by Julia Robeck on February 19, 2015

How to Create & Distribute Flipped Lessons Through EDPuzzle

EDpuzzle is a neat tool that allows you to add your voice and text questions to educational videos. On EDpuzzle you can search for educational videos and or upload your own videos to use as the basis of your lesson. EDpuzzle has an online classroom component that you can use to assign videos to students and track their progress through your video lessons.

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2015/02/how-to-create-distribute-flipped.html?m=1

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Stop Using LinkedIn like Facebook

Posted by Julia Robeck on February 19, 2015

Ten signs you’re using LinkedIn like Facebook (and how to stop)

1. A profile picture that won’t get you hired.

Do yourself a favour and click the “People you may know” button and pick something you like that has a little more respectability to it. The same applies for avatars and pictures with someone else other than you in them.

2. A professional headline that is anything but.

Use a description that is both accurate and related to either the benefit you provide or your title within your company. Either way, this is guaranteed to return your profile in some searches.

3. Shameless friend collecting.

It’s a bad first impression. Give people a reason to connect with you and start off on the right foot.

4. Not even really wanting to be friends.

What do you do with all those connections? Do you actively keep in touch? What do you do when you get a message from a contact about business? Do you tut, sigh and ignore them? Fly into a rant about people contacting you on LinkedIn to talk business opportunities?

5. Going all “selly sell” right off the bat.

Do you send spam messages? The LinkedIn inbox delivers into your recipient’s inbox. It might be a warmer and softer way to get noticed but there is no relationship. Better to create rapport by asking questions, sharing content, joining the same group and showing your expertise and counselling side there.

6. Joining groups and not getting involved.

If you join groups and then don’t contribute, you’re partially responsible for the failure of the group. Quickest remedy is to set your group digest emails to once weekly and comment on a few discussions once a week when your email lands.

7. Liking and commenting on absolutely everything.

Liking and commenting on everything works well on Facebook and gives your friends a vanity boost but on LinkedIn less so. Think of it as being at that networking event and you’re the loud self absorbed guy no-one wants to talk to. Not quite so appealing?

8. Sending tweets directly into LinkedIn.

The automatic #in from Twitter was removed several years ago but it doesn’t stop the socially savvy copying and pasting or using a third party like Hootsuite to update multiple platforms at the same time. I do this but do try to tailor the messages to not include @ and #. Are your tweets even relevant to your LinkedIn audience? You’ll see they might jar after a while.

9. Asking people you barely know for endorsements and testimonials.

It’s a bit like asking your Facebook page to be liked but actually more vulgar because they haven’t presumably sampled your expertise yet.

10. Insharing Richard Branson’s (and other influencer) updates.

OK, it’s not Richard’s fault, but my point is, I often get to see what Richard and many others have to see a hundred times in my feed thanks to this piece of functionality. It’s got to Facebook like proportions.

When hundreds of people do the obvious, have the bottle to stay true to yourself and go your own way.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/ten-signs-youre-using-linkedin-like-facebook-how-stop-ren%C3%A9-power?trk=prof-post

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groups of learners

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 19, 2015

Group of Learners

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/470978073506744466/

group of learners

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Taking Screenshots on Your Laptop or Tablet

Posted by Julia Robeck on February 19, 2015

A Short Guide to Taking Screenshots on Your Laptop and Tablet

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2015/02/a-short-guide-to-taking-screenshots-on.html?m=1

Chromebook:
Diigo’s Awesome Screenshot tool. Awesome Screenshot is a simple one step installation
TechSmith’s Snagit. Awesome Screenshot will only capture things that are displayed in your web browser.
Snagit download the Snagit Chrome app and the Snagit browser extension. . Both tools allow you to draw and type on top of your screenshot images.
Macbook and Windows laptops:
Mac keyboard combination of “Command+shift+4″ “Command+shift+3″ will capture everything on your screen.

Windows computer Snipping tool

Jing to take screenshots on my Mac and on my Windows laptop.

Skitch  If you have an Evernote account, you can save Skitch images in your Evernote account.

iPad and iPhone:
Taking a screenshot on an iPad or iPhone is a simple matter of holding down your “home” button (the big round one) and power button at the same time. The image will save directly to your device’s camera roll. When I need to draw, highlight, or type on an image in my camera roll I turn to Skitch again.

Android phones and tablets:
As long as your device is operating on Android 4.0 or later you can take a screenshot by holding down your home button and power/sleep button at the same time. The screenshot should save to your camera roll unless you’ve designated another place for it to save. Once on your camera roll you can use the image in other apps for drawing, cropping, annotating, and sharing. Some Android devices, depending on manufacturer, include a built-in screenshot image editor.
Pixlr and Skitch. Skitch on Android offers all of the same features that are outlined above. Pixlr is a more robust tool that allows you to apply image filters in addition to drawing and typing on your images.

Please consider other IMS blog entries on the topics:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=screen+capture

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Wearable Tech

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 19, 2015

Sizing Up Wearable Tech and IoT in the Enterprise

https://fiberlinkcorp.webex.com/fiberlinkcorp/onstage/g.php?d=358842843&t=a

Kayla Bittner  358 842 843 Twitter:#smartoffice

Det Ansinn speaker

Android Wear (java)
Pebble (C)
Samsung Tizen (HTML5)
Apple Watch WatchKit (Swift, Objective-C support is buggy)
WatchKit is the least mature

limitations: no keyboard, no mouse, no touch screen, battery life, limited usable screen real estate, CPU performance

opportunities: hands-free, speech for text input, sensors (gyro, camera, accelerometer), gesture-based input, BLE (bluetoothSmart)

GOod wearable Design: Recognizes immediacy, leverages context of the wearer

challenging to develop good experiences for these devices.

802.11 will eat short battery life, in addition to bluetooth. Samsung Gear S will get notification even from afar, but usually smartwatch notification is paired only in immediate proximity of the bluetoothed device.
Addon –
industrial uses of wearable: tag and quickmessages, not occupying hands.
keyboard is with swipe gestures.

Frank Schloendorn, Fiberlink, speaker

build in security is limited. Jailbroken / rooted devices are at higher risk> Open to hacking, still in infancy. No real MDM (Mobile Device Management) type solutions available

Do you currently own smartwatch

Do you currently own smartwatch

no management solutions exist today. OS: Tizen, Android, PebbleOS, Apple Watch OS etc
Cameras and other sensors cant be managed, monitored (spy scenario)
Is wearable an independent device or an extension of a smartphone

Best practices:
manage the connected device, not the wearable
be aware of what data can “leak” to a wearable device
if necessary, take more extreme measures (block bluetooth, ban devices)

new security options for mobile devices linked to wearables. bypass lock screen with presence of wearable, content sensitive security.

bricksimple.com
MaaS360.com/trial

Posted in mobile apps, mobile devices, mobile learning | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

social media in the library

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 18, 2015

Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library

Vanwynsberghe, H. )., Boudry, E. )., Verdegem, P. )., & Vanderlinde, R. ). (2014). Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library? A social network approach. Library Hi Tech, 32(3), 529-545. doi:10.1108/LHT-02-2014-0015

Excellent article. Apparently, they do things differently in Belgium.

“Social media literacy” (SML) can be defined as not only the practical
and critically cognitive competencies possessed by users of social media, but also the
motivation to employ these media effectively and appropriately for social interaction
and communication on the web (Vanwynsberghe and Verdegem, 2013).

Repeated by me numerous times, but ignored consistently.

p. 530 Therefore, the aim of this study is to empirically assess how a social media expert, or the employee with the most knowledge and skills concerning social media, in the library facilitates, or impedes, the information flow and implementation of social media in the library.
p. 541 The findings suggest that such social media experts play a significant role in either supporting or constraining the information flow and implementation of social media.

5.2 A social media expert plays an important role in the library for spreading
information about social media Unsurprisingly, social media experts are the most central actors for giving social media information; they share more social media information with other librarians and rarely receive information in return. Any information they do receive mostly comes from a person skilled in social media use. The social media expert as the central actor in the information network has the power to facilitate or prevent information exchange about social media (Scott and Carrington, 2012).

this is, if the experts are ALLOWED to participate. What if the social media access is usurped by very few others?

even worse, what if the social media is decentralized across?

 

Posted in Digital literacy, Library and information science, media literacy, social media, technology literacy | Tagged: , | No Comments »

Tips on Pairing Fonts Well

Posted by Julia Robeck on February 18, 2015

Tips on pairing fonts well using four methods:

how to pair fonts

This is extremely helpful when designing anything with typography.

types

You can use color and font weight to add interest and differentiate between words, like PayPal and Piktochart below.

contrast

Applying different font sizes or typefaces within the same font classes creates differences between headings, subheading, and body text.

similarity

Combine your text with a picture and you’ve got limitless potential to create an interesting moment.

content

http://piktochart.com/typography-things-you-need-to-know-to-pair-fonts-well/?utm_source=intercom&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekly-tip-feb

Check out this post for more infographics resources.

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digital literacy instruction for SCSU Health class

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 18, 2015

Digital literacy instruction for Troy Shafer SCSU Health class

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/health/ or
http://scsu.mn/1AFO7V2

It is tailored after the instructor’s requests.

What would you add to the list?

Posted in Digital literacy, technology literacy | No Comments »

on digital literacy and old habits

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 18, 2015

“Academic libraries are concerned about the digital literacy of their users but their programs continue to be focused on the information components defined by the President’s Commission on Information Literacy.” (p. 45)

Cordell, R.  (2013). Library Instruction in the 21st Century. In: Rosanne, M (Ed.) Library Reference Services and Information Literacy: Models for Academic Institutions: Models for Academic Institutions. IGI Global.

More on digital literacy in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=library+digital+literacy

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Infographics Workshops: Interpret and Present Data

Posted by Julia Robeck on February 18, 2015

How do you present the idea of your research and intertwine it with data in a cohesive, interesting way? Join us in a short session to learn effective communication through infographics using data visualization and design.

Location: Miller Center 205

Wednesday, February 18 2-2:45pm
Thursday, March 19 11-11:45am
Tuesday, April 14, 10-10:45am
Thursday, April 30, 10-10:45am

Register or see more information here:
http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/general/ims/default.asp

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