learning out of comfort zone

Learning Outside Your Comfort Zone

By:  March 22nd, 2017

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/learning-outside-comfort-zone

When we learn something outside the comfort zone, we attempt to acquire knowledge or skills in an area where we’re lacking. Part of the discomfort derives from learning something we anticipate will be difficult. We have no idea how to do it, or we think it requires abilities we don’t have or have in meager amounts. Moreover, poor performance or outright failure lurk as likely possibilities.

I wonder if learning outside the comfort zone isn’t especially difficult for faculty. Theoretically, it shouldn’t be. We’ve devoted years to learning, but most of what we know resides in one area. We’re experts at learning more about what we already know and love. And we’re used to having our learning expertise recognized—by students, colleagues, and sometimes even at home. However, plop us down in a discipline unlike our own, task us with learning a skill we don’t have, and suddenly, we look and act exactly like our students. And that’s the very reason this kind of learning has all sorts of positive implications for teaching. It’s good every now and then to be reacquainted with feeling stupid.

learning out of comfort zone

My note. Eventually, I had to tell a [already departured] library director: it is better to throw stones in the swamp of mediocrity then to sink slowly into it. To the objection of my colleague that throwing stones does NOT improve the situation, I could only say: making ripples until someone more diplomatic will draw the attention means more then just slowing sinking into the swamp of mediocrity. That swamp is determined by the inability / unwillingness of faculty the leave their comfort zone.

In regard to the teacher, who has students memorize and recite a poem – I will never forget Herr Klenske, who made us memorize in 10th grade of high school “Erlkoening” (http://ingeb.org/Lieder/werreite.html). It made us hate him as much, as now I, at least, appreciate his unique approach to fostering to high school students persistence and will.

++++++++++++++++++
more about learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning

digital humanities for librarians

Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians

Instructor: John Russell Dates: April 3rd to 28th, 2017 Credits: 1.5 CEUs Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/112-digital-humanities.php

Digital humanities (DH) has been heralded as the next big thing in humanities scholarship and universities have been creating initiatives and new positions in this field. Libraries, too, have moved to create a presence in the digital humanities community, setting up centers and hiring librarians to staff them. This course is designed as an introduction for librarians or library school students who have little or no exposure to DH and wish to be better positioned to offer DH support or services in a library setting. Participants will read and discuss DH scholarship, learn about frequently-used software, and think about why and how libraries and librarians engage DH. While I will encourage participants to explore more complex computing approaches (and I will support those who do as best I can), this course does not presuppose computing skills such as programming or use of the command line and will not ask participants to do much more than upload files to websites or install and use simple programs. Participants should have an interest and background in humanities scholarship and humanities librarianship and while the readings will focus on activities in the United States, our discussions can be more geographically wide-ranging.

Objectives:

– A basic knowledge of what digital humanities is and how it effects scholarship in the humanities disciplines.

– Exposure to core tools and approaches used by digital humanists.

– An understanding of how libraries and librarians have been involved with digital humanities.

– Critical engagement with the role of librarians and libraries in digital humanities.

This class has a follow-up, Introduction to Text Encoding

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/133-text-encoding.php

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.”

Read an interview with John Russell about this class:

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=769

+++++++++++++++++

more on digital humanities in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+humanities

Susan Grajek at Bryan Alexander on IT and education

Susan Grajek at Bryan Alexander on IT and education

Forum takes a deep dive into higher education and technology. On Thursday, March 23rd, from 2-3 pm EST we will be joined by Susan Grajek, the vice president for communities and research at EDUCAUSE

+++++++++++++++++++

Top 10 IT Issues, 2017: Foundations for Student Success

Augmented Reality for Educators

Augmented Reality For Educators

Published on

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/augmented-reality-educators-robert-bilyk

my note: definitions of AR, QR code as simple form of AR

Stillwater history project to mimic PokenmonGo type of organization for by using ArmMaker (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/armaker/id1021239002?mt=8) and LodeStar

Potential to compare and borrow/merge gamification project as described here:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

+++++++++++++++++++++
More on VR, AR and Mixed Reality in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=augmented

student engagement

Three Ways to Engage Students In and Outside the Classroom

By:  March 20th, 2017 

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/three-ways-engage-students/

Get real

realistic role-plays are primarily designed to be problem-solving exercises.

See a show

Breathe fire

Breathing life into concepts is the hallmark of effective teaching.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
more on students engagement in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=students+engagement

OpenRefine

http://openrefine.org/

A free, open source, powerful tool for working with messy data

OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) is a powerful tool for working with messy data: cleaning it; transforming it from one format into another; and extending it with web services and external data.

Please note that since October 2nd, 2012, Google is not actively supporting this project, which has now been rebranded to OpenRefine. Project development, documentation and promotion is now fully supported by volunteers.

++++++++++++++++++++++
more on big data in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

social media for anthropology

ANTH 101 with Kelly Branam Macauley

Plamen Miltenoff: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
relevant classes I teach and might be of interest for you:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/
and
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

short link to this presentation: http://bit.ly/lib4anth

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

what is social media from anthropological point of view?

a study, the “Why We Post” project, has just been published by nine anthropologists, led by Daniel Miller of University College, London. worked independently for 15 months at locations in Brazil, Britain, Chile, China (one rural and one industrial site), India, Italy, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turkey.

In rural China and Turkey social media were viewed as a distraction from education. But in industrial China and Brazil they were seen to be an educational resource. Such a divide was evident in India, too. There, high-income families regarded them with suspicion but low-income families advocated them as a supplementary source of schooling. In Britain, meanwhile, they were valued not directly as a means of education, but as a way for pupils, parents and teachers to communicate.

How would you answer if addressed by this study? How do you see social media?

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Jordan, K. (2017, January 13). When Social Media Are the News | Anthropology-News [American Anthropological Association]. Retrieved from http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/01/13/when-social-media-are-the-news/
On a recent visit in 2015, I found the social media landscape dramatically changed, again. Facebook began actively steering reading practices through changes in 2013 to the News Feed algorithm, which determines content in the site’s central feature. That year, Facebook announced an effort to prioritize “high quality content,” defined as timely, relevant, and trustworthy—and not clickbait, memes, or other viral links. This policy, along with changing practices in sharing news content generally, meant that current events can unfold on and through social media.
how much of your news do you acquire through social media? do you trust the information you acquire through social media? #FakeNews – have explored this hashtag? What is your take on fake news? 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Fournier, S., Quelch, J., & Rietveld, B. (2016, August 17). To Get More Out of Social Media, Think Like an Anthropologist. Retrieved March 17, 2017, from https://hbr.org/2016/08/to-get-more-out-of-social-media-think-like-an-anthropologist 
meaning management :
Anthropologists and the culturally sensitive analysts take complex bits of data and develop a higher-order sense of them. Information and meaning work at cross purposes. In managing meaning, context is everything while in managing information context is error and noise. When we give our social listening projects to information specialists, we lose an appreciation of context and with it the ability to extract the meanings that provide insight for our companies and brands.
Meaning management also involves a deeper appreciation of social listening as a component of a broader meaning-making system, rather than as, simply, a data source to be exploited.
How do you perceive meaning management? Do you see yourself being a professional with the ability to collect, analyze and interpret such data for your company?
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Kraemer, J. (n.d.). Comparing Worlds through Social Media | Platypus. Retrieved from http://blog.castac.org/2016/04/whywepost/
——————————————-

please use this form to cast your feedback. Please feel free to fill out only the relevant questions:
http://bit.ly/imseval

fake news bibliography

Fake news infographics

how to stop fake news;

how to stop fake news;

The Global Critical Media Literacy Educators’ Resource Guide

http://gcml.org/the-global-critical-media-literacy-educators-resource-guide/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/595460381951548696/

Students will be introduced to exercises, experiences, and assignments, which focus on developing student’s classroom engagement, empowerment, critical awareness of media, civic engagement, and adoption of a social justice agenda. The guide enables students to work with faculty to produce GCMLP Webpage content, which can be consumed by the public to help expand citizen’s understanding of key events and processes in the global society. Furthermore, participating students will be granted academic and employment opportunities through the GCMLP, so they can be equitable participants in the 21st century economy.
++++++++++++++++++++++++
more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Koch brothers and higher ed

Here are some excerpts regarding Koch brothers’ attempts to influence higher education:

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/8/9/1230049/-Koch-Brothers-Influence-Peddling-Is-Your-Alma-Mater-on-the-List

The Charles G. Koch Foundation offered to give the university $1.5 million to hire two assistant professors and fund fellowships and undergraduate curriculum on free-enterprise topics.

“In exchange for his ‘gift,’ the donor got to assign specific readings, select speakers brought to campus and instruct them with regard to the focus of their lectures, shape the curriculum with new courses and specify the number of students in the courses, name the program’s director, and initiate a student club.”

How the Koch Brothers Are Influencing U.S. Colleges

The most notable difference: While some of Soros’ higher education grants go to programs aligning with his domestic policy priorities, the majority are focused overseas, tax records show.

Spreading the Free-Market Gospel

What’s new and interesting about the Koch brothers’ approach to funding academics

DAVE LEVINTHAL

https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/10/spreading-the-free-market-gospel/413239/

It is well-known that the Kochs’ network has invested hundreds of millions of hard-to-track dollars in conservative political nonprofits that influence elections. The brothers, who earned theirbillions leading private oil, chemical, and manufacturing conglomerate Koch Industries Inc., were dominant forces in recent election cycles
The Kochs educational giving, while rarefied, isn’t the most abundant in the United States. Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Intel, with his wife Betty, this year pledged $100 million to the California Institute of Technology—and offered to let the school to spend it as it sees fit.
At the College of Charleston in South Carolina, for example, documents show the foundation wanted more than just academic excellence for its money. It wanted information about students it could potentially use for its own benefit

Among the proposed conditions: Teachings must align with the libertarian economic philosophy of Charles Koch, the Charles Koch Foundation would maintain partial control over faculty hiring and the chairman of the school’s economics department—a prominent economic theorist—must stay in place for another three years despite his plans to step down.

Florida State University ultimately didn’t agree to the initial requests when, in 2008, it reached a funding agreement with the foundation. It’s also tightened and clarified policies that affect private donors’ contributions to the university.

To Charles Koch, Universities Are Propaganda Machines

1 2 3 4 188