InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Emerging EdTech

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 22, 2015

Emerging Technologies in Education

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/453456256206780716
Emerging Technologies in Education

Posted in educational technology, gaming, learning analytics | Tagged: , , , | No Comments »

Personalized Learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 22, 2015

Personalized Learning

https://www.pinterest.com/pin//314055773990982969

Personalized Learning

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e-portfolio: LInkedIn

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 20, 2015

My note: LinkedIn is making one step further toward establishing itself as a viable option for electronic portfolio.

LinkedIn Intros One-Click Program for Adding Degree Credentials to User Profiles

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/03/18/linkedin-intros-one-click-program-for-adding-degree-credentials-to-user-profiles.aspx

With a newly expanded “Add to Profile” program from LinkedIn, colleges and universities can invite their graduates to display their degrees and certificates on their LinkedIn profiles by clicking a single link.

more on electronic portfolios on this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/29/electronic-portfolio-resources/

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MakerSpace in the library

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 20, 2015

Library Makerspaces: From Dream to Reality

Instructor: Melissa Robinson

Dates: April 6 to May 1st, 2015

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/114-makerspaces.php

Designing a makerspace for your library is an ambitious project that requires significant staff time and energy. The economic, educational and inspirational rewards for your community and your library, however, will make it all worthwhile. This class will make the task of starting a makerspace less daunting by taking librarians step by step through the planning process. Using readings, online resources, discussions and hands-on exercises, participants will create a plan to bring a makerspace or maker activities to their libraries. Topics covered will include tools, programs, space, funding, partnerships and community outreach. This is a unique opportunity to learn in depth about one public library’s experience creating a fully-functioning makerspace, while also exploring other models for engaging libraries in the maker movement.

Melissa S. Robinson is the Senior Branch Librarian at the Peabody Institute Library’s West Branch in Peabody, Massachusetts. Melissa has over twelve years of experience in public libraries. She has a BA in political science from Merrimack College, a graduate certificate in Women in Politics and Public Policy from the University of Massachusetts Boston and a MLIS from Southern Connecticut State University. She is the co-author of Transforming Libraries, Building Communities (Scarecrow Press, 2013).

Read an interview with Melissa about this class:

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=733

Course Structure

This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional sychronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.

Payment Info

You can register in this course through the first week of instruction. The “Register” button on the website goes to our credit card payment gateway, which may be used with personal or institutional credit cards. (Be sure to use the appropriate billing address). If your institution wants to pay using a purchase order, please contact us to make arrangements.

 

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3D printing, drones and wearable

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 19, 2015

CoSN 2015: The Emerging Tech That’s Transforming K–12’s Horizon

One year or less (2015–2016):

  • BYOD
  • Cloud computing
  • Makerspaces
  • Mobile learning

Two to three years (2017–2018):

  • 3D printing/rapid prototyping
  • Adaptive learning technologies
  • Information visualization
  • Learning analytics

Four to five years (2019–2020):

  • Badges/Microcredit
  • Drones
  • Visual data analysis
  • Wearable technology

The NMC’s interim K–12 Horizon Report can be downloaded for free.

Posted in Digital literacy, technology literacy | Tagged: , | No Comments »

Recommendations for games and gaming at LRS

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 19, 2015

Gaming and Gamification in academic and library settings (paper)

Based on the literature regarding games, gaming, gamification, game-based learning, and serious games, several clear trends emerge:

  1. Gaming and gamification in the sense of game-based learning is about using games and game-like tactics in the education process, for greater engagement and better learning outcomes. However, this is only the first level of such initiative. The second and higher level is about involving students in the game-building and gamification of the learning process (as per Vygotsky’s Zone of…) thus achieving student-centered and experiential learning.
  2. When hosting games and gaming in any library, “in-person” or electronic/online games are welcome but not sufficient to fulfill their promise, especially in an academic library. Per (1), an academic library has the responsibility to involve students and guide them in learning how to engage in the building process required in true game-based learning.
  3. Game-based learning, gaming and gamification in particular, in educational (academic library) settings must consider mobile devices and the BYOD movement in particular as intrinsic parts of the entire process. Approaching the initiative primarily by acquiring online “in-person” games, or game consoles has the same limited educational potential as only hosting games, rather than elevating the students to full guided engagement with game-based learning. If public relations and raised profile are the main goals for the academic library, such an approach is justified. If the academic library seeks to maximize the value of game-based learning, then the library must consider: a. gaming consoles, b. mobile devices as part of a BYOD initiative and c. cloud-based / social games, such as MineCraft, SimCity etc.
  4. Design for game-based learning, gaming and gamification in educational (academic library) settings must include multiple forms of assessment and reward, e.g. badges, leaderboards and/or certificates as an intrinsic part of the entire process. Merely hosting games in the academic library cannot guarantee true game-based learning. The academic library, as the forefront of a game-based learning initiative on campus, must work with faculty on understanding and fine tuning badges and similar new forms of assessment and reward, as they effectively implement large scale game-based learning, focused on the students’ learning gains.

Recommendations for LRS

  1. In regard to LRS, the gaming and gamification process must be organized and led by faculty, including housing and distributing the hardware, software and applications, when needed.
  2. The attached paper and the respective conclusions summarized in four points demand educational and experiential background, which is above the limits of the LRS staff. In addition, the LRS staff has clearly admitted that the pedagogical value of gaming and gamification is beyond their interest. This recommendation is not contradicting to the fact and opportunity for LRS staff to participate in the process and contribute to the process; it just negates the possibility of staff mandating and leading the process, since it will keep the gaming and gamification process on a very rudimentary level.
  3. The process must be further led by faculty with a terminal degree in education (Ph.D.) and experience in the educational field, since, as proved by the attached paper and 4 point conclusion, the goal is not a public-library type of hosting activities, but rather involving students in a pedagogically-sound creative process, with the respective opportunity for assessment and future collaboration with instructors across campus. This recommendation is not contradicting the fact and opportunity for LRS library faculty to participate actively in the process and contribute to the process. It just safeguards from restricting the process to the realm of “public-library” type of hosting activities, but failing to elevate them to the needs of an academic campus and connecting with instructors across campus.
  4. This conclusions adhere to and are derived from the document recommended by the LRS dean, discussed and accepted by LRS faculty in 2013 about new trends and directions in academic libraries, namely diversification of LRS faculty; breaking from the traditional library mold of including faculty from different disciplines with different opinions and ideas.

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games for teaching, learning, assessment

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 18, 2015

Zondle

https://www.zondle.com/publicPagesv2/

 

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when reorganization starts

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 18, 2015

reorganization done the old fashion way and reorganization done differently

Linda Hill: How to manage for collective creativity

so,

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Library Technology Conference, 2015

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 18, 2015

Library Technology Conference, 2015

http://libtechconf.org/

Twitter: #LTC2015

MakerSpace slideshow:

 

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Assessment

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on March 18, 2015

Pls have a link to the PDF file

edutopia-dl-finley-53-ways-to-check-understanding

Here some opinions from the comments section:

Dr. Tom Mawhinney

Touro College professor teaching graduate education courses

Formative assessments are only good if you use them to alter your teaching or for students to adjust their learning. Too often, I’ve seen exit tickets used and nothing is done with the results.

Please consider other IMS blog postings on assessment

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=assessment

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