digital humanities workshop

***”Culture & Technology” – European Summer University in Digital
Humanities (ESU DH C & T) 19th to 29th of July, University of Leipzig*
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/

As ESU DH C & T is a member of the International Digital Humanities
Training Network courses taken at the Summer University are eligible for
transfer credit towards the University of Victoria Graduate Certificate
in DH (see http://www.uvic.ca/humanities/english/graduate/graduate-certificates/dhum-certificate/index.php).

The Summer University takes place across 11 whole days. The intensive
programme consists of workshops, public lectures, regular project
presentations, a poster session, and a panel discussion.

The *workshop programme* is composed of the following thematic strands:

– XML-TEI encoding, structuring and rendering
– Compilation, Annotation und Analysis of Written Text Corpora. Introduction to Methods and Tools

– Comparing Corpora
– Digital Editions and Editorial Theory: Historical Texts and Documents
– Searching Linguistic Patterns in Large Text Corpora for Digital Humanities Research
– Lexicometric text analysis using CLARIN-D Webservices and R
– Stylometry
– Spoken Language and Multimodal Corpora
– Digital Lexica, Terminological Databases and Encyclopaedias: Contents, Structures and Formats
– Exploring art and technology within contemporary network culture. A close look at net art, digital art curation and its impact on the culture heritage sector
– From Text to Map. Modeling Historical Humanities Data in Mapping

Environments
– Project Management
– Data management for the humanities: from data warehousing to legal and ethical implication
– Digital Research Infrastructures in the Humanities: How to Use, Build and Maintain Them

Workshops are normally structured in such a way that participants can either take the two blocks of one workshop or two blocks from different workshops. The number of participants in each workshop is limited to 10. For more information see:
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/node/621
The Summer University is directed at 60 participants from all over Europe and beyond. It wants to bring together (doctoral) students, young scholars and academics from the Arts and Humanities, Library Sciences, Social Sciences, Engineering and Computer Sciences as equal partners to an interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge and experience in a multilingual and multicultural context and thus create the conditions for future project-based cooperations and network-building across the borders of disciplines, countries, languages and cultures.

The Summer University seeks to offer a space for the discussion and acquisition of new knowledge, skills and competences in those computer technologies which play a central role in Humanities Computing and which determine every day more and more the work done in the Humanities and Cultural Sciences, as well as in publishing, libraries, and archives, to name only some of the most important areas. The Summer University aims at integrating these activities into the broader context of the Digital Humanities, which pose questions about the consequences and implications of the application of computational methods and tools to cultural artefacts of all kinds.

In all this the Summer University aims at confronting the so-called Gender Divide , i.e. the under-representation of women in the domain of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in Germany and Europe. But, instead of strengthening the hard sciences as such by following the way taken by so many measures which focus on the so-called STEM disciplines and try to convince women of the attractiveness and importance of Computer Science or Engineering, the Summer University relies on the challenges that the Humanities with their complex data and their wealth of women represent for Computer Science and Engineering and
the further development of the latter, on the overcoming of the boarders between the so-called hard and soft sciences and on the integration of Humanities, Computer Science and Engineering.

As the Summer University is dedicated not only to the acquisition of knowledge and skills, but wants also to foster community building and networking across disciplines, languages and cultures, countries and continents, the programme of the Summer School features also communal coffee breaks, communal lunches in the refectory of the university, and a rich cultural programme (thematic guided tours, visits of archives, museums and exhibitions, and communal dinners in different parts of Leipzig).

For all relevant information please consult the Web-Portal of the European Summer School in Digital Humanities “Culture & Technology”: http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/ which will be continually updated and integrated with more information as soon as it becomes available.

For questions about the European Summer University please use esu_ct@uni-leipzig.de
With best regards, Elisabeth Burr

Prof. Dr. Elisabeth Burr
Lehrstuhl Französische / frankophone und italienische Sprachwissenschaft
Institut für Romanistik
Universität Leipzig
Beethovenstr. 15
D-04107 Leipzig
http://home.uni-leipzig.de/burr/
http://www.dhd2016.de/
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/quebec/
http://www.uni-leipzig.de/gal2010
http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~burr/JISU

peer review in class

Frame Your Feedback: Making Peer Review Work in Class

By:

June 6th, 2016

Frame Your Feedback: Making Peer Review Work in Class

Instruct students to include a brief memo of guidance with the work they would like others to review. The memo includes two components: a context paragraph and a list of questions.

Recommendations for Revitalizing the Student Peer Review Process

  1. Have a candid discussion about students’ experiences with peer review.
  2. Emphasize the broad range of peer review.
  3. Make students accountable for accurate, useful feedback.
  4. Model these practices in your feedback to students.
  5. Require students to write memos when they ask for your feedback.
  6. Every professional needs feedback to succeed in their work. These skills can set the foundation for how to ask for, receive, and provide useful feedback.

References

Simmons, J. (May 2003). Responders are taught, not born. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy 46(8), 684–693.

VanDeWeghe, R. (September 2004). “Awesome, dude!”: Responding helpfully to peer writing. English Journal 94(1), 95–99.

online discussion Reddit style

BLEND-ONLINE] Looking for private, Reddit-style vote up/down discussion tool

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Sharon Strauss
Sent: Friday, June 03, 2016 10:46 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Looking for private, Reddit-style vote up/down discussion tool

Hello,

Thanks for all the online and offline responses. A quick summary of where I am with this project, and the various solutions offered.

Piazza–Piazza will integrate with our LMS via LTI and we do have it. As far as I can tell, after some initial enthusiasm for it a few years ago, nobody here has been using. Thus, I cannot speak to the spam issue that Nina raised. Still, I looked at it and do not see any vote up/down option on it. It is structured more as a Q & A organizer. There is an option for professors to rate an answer as good or bad, but that it is different from a popular vote.

WordPress Theme or Plugin–I found a couple of vote up/down WordPress solutions. However, as far as I can tell, none are actively maintained. The most recent I saw is a couple of years old.

Google Moderator–This looks like it may have been just what we want, but Google retired the program last year. Currently you just get the message, “We’ve retired Google Moderator. The site is no longer available in any form, but you can get to data from past Moderator series through our “Download your Data” tool.

Brightspace–May work for those that have it, but we do not.

Canvas–Perhaps another area where it beats Moodle. However, we do not have it and I’m not sure we want to get it at this time.

Drupal–This might work! I did not see an up/down vote option with http://skill-tree.org, but it seems there are a few options.  I’m looking into this further.
Commercial options–I got suggestions for commercial software such as http://crowdicity.com and https://www.uservoice.com/. Both seem like they could work, but I don’t know if we have a budget for this.

FYI, I got more detail from the professor about the project. I learned he is not looking for a classroom solution. He is looking to lead a potentially sensitive and controversial campus-wise conversation. Thus, this might not be the best place to have posted. Still, maybe someone else on the list will also find this useful.

-Sharon

 

Sharon Strauss
Instructional Technology Services
IITS
Haverford College
sstrauss@haverford.edu
610-896-4916

fulbright opportunities

The Fulbright Scholar Program offers teaching, research or combination teaching and research awards in over 125 countries for the 2017-2018 academic year. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty and administrators as well as for professionals, independent scholars and many others.

This year, the Fulbright Scholar Program is offering over 95 awards in the field of Education. Opportunities include:

For additional awards in the field of education, please visit our discipline highlights webpage. There you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in education, as well as scholar testimonials which highlight the outcomes and benefits associated with completing a Fulbright Scholar grant.
For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link: http://cies.org/program/core-fulbright-us-scholar-program. You may also wish to explore our webinars or register with My Fulbright to receive exclusive program updates and application tips. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and the current competition will close on August 1, 2016.

Please contact Jennifer Bhiro at jbhiro@iie.org or reach any of our regional program staff for more information. We are happy to answer any questions you may have on applying.

The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world.

how teachers use data

The Three Ways Teachers Use Data—and What Technology Needs to Do Better

By Karen Johnson May 17, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-05-17-the-three-ways-teachers-use-data-and-what-technology-can-do-better

After surveying more than 4,650 educators, we learned that teachers are essentially trying to do three things with data—each of which technology can dramatically improve:

1. Assess

2. Analyze

3. Pivot

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What’s At Risk When Schools Focus Too Much on Student Data?

What’s At Risk When Schools Focus Too Much on Student Data?

The U.S. Department of Education has increasingly encouraged and funded states to collect and analyze information about students: grades, state test scores, attendance, behavior, lateness, graduation rates and school climate measures like surveys of student engagement.

The argument in favor of all this is that the more we know about how students are doing, the better we can target instruction and other interventions. And sharing that information with parents and the community at large is crucial. It can motivate big changes.

what might be lost when schools focus too much on data. Here are five arguments against the excesses of data-driven instruction.

1) Motivation stereotype threat.

it could create negative feelings about school, threatening students’ sense of belonging, which is key to academic motivation.

2) Helicoptering

Today, parents increasingly are receiving daily text messages with photos and videos from the classroom. A style of overly involved “intrusive parenting” has been associated in studies with increased levels of anxiety and depression when students reach college. “Parent portals as utilized in K-12 education are doing significant harm to student development,” argues college instructor John Warner in a recent piece for Inside Higher Ed.

3) Commercial Monitoring and Marketing

The National Education Policy Center releases annual reports on commercialization and marketing in public schools. In its most recent report in May, researchers there raised concerns about targeted marketing to students using computers for schoolwork and homework. Companies like Google pledge not to track the content of schoolwork for the purposes of advertising. But in reality these boundaries can be a lot more porous. For example, a high school student profiled in the NEPC report often consulted commercial programs like dictionary.com and Sparknotes: “Once when she had been looking at shoes, she mentioned, an ad for shoes appeared in the middle of a Sparknotes chapter summary.”

4) Missing What Data Can’t Capture

Computer systems are most comfortable recording and analyzing quantifiable, structured data. The number of absences in a semester, say; or a three-digit score on a multiple-choice test that can be graded by machine, where every question has just one right answer.

5) Exposing Students’ “Permanent Records”

In the past few years several states have passed laws banning employers from looking at the credit reports of job applicants. Employers want people who are reliable and responsible. But privacy advocates argue that a past medical issue or even a bankruptcy shouldn’t unfairly dun a person who needs a fresh start.

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more on big data in education in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data+education

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