InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

3d printing libraries

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 10, 2015

From: Almond, Emily [mailto:ealmond@georgialibraries.org]
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 6:28 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: Re: 3D printing in libraries

Hi guys, we have 21 3D printers in public libraries in GA and we created this resource page to help our libs decide what works for them: http://galibtech.org/?page_id=1052

Also, our system administrator Daniel Zeiger, had these thoughts:

UP mini if you want something cheap and plug and play. ~$600 dollars and doesn’t need much maintenance but its build plate is fairly small (this can be a good thing if you don’t want prints that can run all night).

For a little more you can grab the UP plus 2/Afinia H480 which gives you a larger build plate and allows you to see the print from any angle while printing. The plus 2 also self levels which takes a huge step out of the printing process.

If you want something that requires a bit more maintenance but also gives you much more control over your printer and settings (and a larger build plate) I would go for the FlashForge Creator Pro or the Ultimaker 2. Both of these offer superior print quality and control, but require more tinkering and knowledge to print successfully.

Emily Almond

Director, IT

Georgia Public Library Service
On Feb 6, 2015, at 12:09 PM, Amy Jiang <ajiang@laverne.edu> wrote:

Ajiang@laverne.edu
 
On Feb 6, 2015, at 8:21 AM, cherie bronkar <cheriebr35@yahoo via <dmarc_fix@lists.ala.org> wrote:

cbronkar@kent.edu

Cherie

On Friday, February 6, 2015 11:12 AM, Janet Ann Crum <Janet.Crum@nau.edu> wrote:

Great idea! I’d be happy to help with that.

 

Janet

Sent from my iPhone
On Feb 6, 2015, at 9:05 AM, Cindi Blyberg <cindiann@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey all!

Is there interest in forming a LITA Interest Group around 3D printing or Makerspaces?

More information about IGs can be found here:

http://www.ala.org/lita/about/manual/litamanualsection6

and the petition to form one is here:

http://www.ala.org/lita/sites/ala.org.lita/files/content/about/manual/forms/E5-IGpetition%20renewa.pdf

Other groups have collected signatures via Google doc, but some have been formed during the middle of a conference.

Have fun! :)

On Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 6:30 PM, Matt Beckstrom <MBeckstrom@lclibrary.org> wrote:

I may not be able to recommend any particular 3D printer model, but I can recommend a service that we use that makes offering 3D printers to my patrons really easy.  We use an online system called Skyforge from a company called Element Robot (https://skyforge.co/home/).  This system facilitates the uploading of 3d plans, the payment of them, and printing them to the printer.  It really is a time saver for me and my staff.

If you have any questions, please let me know.

 

Matt Beckstrom
mbeckstrom@lclibrary.org

Systems Librarian
Lewis & Clark Library
120 S Last Chance Gulch
Helena, MT  59601

http://www.lclibrary.org
(406)  447-1690 x111

>>> John Fitzgibbon <jfitzgibbon@Galwaylibrary.ie> 2/5/2015 3:55 AM >>>

Hi,

We are interested in providing access to 3D printers in our largest library. Our hope is to make the printer available to children between the ages of ten and fifteen so that they would gain experience in designing and creating three dimensional artifacts.

I am not sure if there is a 3D printer that is that user friendly.  Is it feasible to provide this service to this target audience? What is the best 3D printer to use?

I would appreciate any advice.

Regards

John

John Fitzgibbon

Executive Librarian

 

w: www.galwaylibrary.ie

 

 

 

 

 

Previous IMS posts on 3d printing:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=3d+printing

Posted in Digital literacy, Library and information science, technology literacy | Tagged: , | No Comments »

privacy smart devices

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 10, 2015

Samsung’s Privacy Policy Warns Customers Their Smart TVs Are Listening

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/02/09/385001258/samsungs-privacy-policy-warns-customers-their-smart-tvs-are-listening

All of Samsung’s smart TVs — which take voice commands — come with a warning to consumers that essentially says: Your TV is listening and might be sending what you say to Samsung and a third party responsible for transcribing what you say.

Posted in Digital literacy, technology literacy | Tagged: , | No Comments »

games for building and exploration

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 9, 2015

Beyond Minecraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/beyond-minecraft-games-that-inspire-building-and-exploration/

1. Garry’s Mod 

garryscreenshotGarry’s Mod (GMod) is a sandbox game like Minecraft but instead of building and exploring, students use a fun physics engine that simulates things like gravity and mass. They also use a virtual toy box of assets from Valve Software’s popular games. The tool is a step up in complexity from the elegant simplicity of Minecraft, but with Garry’s Mod, students are exposed to physics concepts while having madcap fun.

2. Kerbal Space Program

kerbal_screenshotKerbal Space Program has a robust physics engine too, but it’s more focused than Garry’s Mod. Players purchase rocket parts, put them together, and then see if they can get a ship into orbit, to one of two moons, or even to another planet. These aren’t easy tasks, so play is focused on trial and error testing, and, like Minecraft, seeking help from the community is part of a successful strategy.

3. Sound Shapes 

soundshapes_screenshotSound Shapes is a visually stunning platform puzzle game set to a rich musical soundscape. Even better: students can create and share their own levels – like interactive sheet music — using sounds and objects unlocked by playing the platform game. It’s an accessible entry point into musical composition as well as game design, and provides an experience that builds on the creativity of Minecraft while offering something wholly unique for music lovers.

4. DIY

DIYFor creative kids who want to get their hands dirty, check out DIY, a site where students can find things to build, instructions for how to build them, and ways to share their creations with others. All projects are aligned to 50 skills that run the gamut from outdoors to indoors, and feature various challenges to complete and cool badges to earn and display.

5. STENCYL

screen568x568Computer programming is a great next step for students who love to mod Minecraft or toy around with the redstone resource (which simulates basic logic and circuitry). One solid entry-level tool is Stencyl, a game creation program focused on codeless, cross-platform game making. By snapping blocks of code together, students can create games that can be published and played on a variety of platforms including mobile phones.

6. CODECADEMY

Codecademy is a web-based, self-paced site that teaches actual industry-standard languages like PHP, Javascript, Python, Ruby, HTML, and CSS. While students don’t create publishable games like they would in Stencyl, their learning is purpose-driven and contextualized, e.g. JavaScript for web development or Ruby for app development. And students do get to see their code’s output directly onscreen.

Minecraft has introduced a lot of youth to games as well as the critical thinking, problem solving, and creation skills necessary for self-motivated learning. The games and sites on this list have the potential to extend that learning, providing fresh outlets for self-expression in the digital world and beyond.

More on gaming in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=minecraft

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

Posted in gamification, gaming | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

TMT Predictions 2015

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 8, 2015

The re-enterprization of IT

TMT Predictions 2015

http://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/technology-media-and-telecommunications/articles/tmt-pred-re-enterprization-of-it.html

 

Posted in information technology | Tagged: , | No Comments »

boost Facebook post

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 6, 2015

Boost Your Posts

https://www.facebook.com/help/547448218658012/

—–Original Message—–
From: lkobash88@ucla.edu [mailto:lkobash88@ucla.edu]
Sent: Friday, February 06, 2015 5:34 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Facebook Boosting

Hello! This is for those of you managing library social media accounts:

Has anyone used the boosting option for posts on Facebook?

https://www.facebook.com/help/547448218658012/

My library is experimenting with this and we are not sure how successful it’s been or will be and are wondering if anyone else had had good/bad results from it or knows of libraries that have. Any input is appreciated! Thanks!

Posted in Facebook, social media | Tagged: | No Comments »

web development

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 5, 2015

Xara Web Designer: http://www.xara.com/us/

if you’re looking for a more affordable and easier to use Web development system than Dreamweaver, I may have just the thing for you: Xara Web Designer 9.

http://www.cio.com/article/2385755/developer/no-more-adobe-dreamweaver–so-how-about-xara-web-designer-.html

Other IMS blog entries on Web development:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/01/29/dreamweaver-cc/

Posted in web development, web editing | Tagged: , | No Comments »

Protected: GIS and GeoWeb Technologies

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 4, 2015

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Posted in Digital literacy, information technology, instructional technology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Enter your password to view comments.

badges

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 4, 2015

4 Benefits To Using Badges In Online Learning

http://elearningindustry.com/using-badges-in-online-learning

greater autonomy for students, greater levels of feedback, and a variety of assignments.

More on badges in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges

In each of the classes for which I use badges I have 24 different badges that students can earn. Each one is a “micro-assignment” which asks students to apply some concept or set of concepts we are covering in the class. Students submit their responses and if they meet the badge criteria they earn the badge. When they earn a badge they receive the points for that in their grades and also receive a badge graphic uploaded to their own personal profile which only they can see. One feature I would like to incorporate is the ability to share these badges via their social networks but I am not sure about how this would work with regard to FERPA requirements. More research on my part is needed regarding this.

If the student does not earn the badge, they are provided with detailed feedback and allowed to resubmit to try and earn the badge. They can submit as many times as they want or need to in order to earn the badge. Students need to earn a minimum of 14 badges to earn a C in the course and 18 badges to earn an A.

Posted in gamification, gaming, instructional technology, learning, mobile learning, online learning, pedagogy | Tagged: | No Comments »

Where the iPad should go next: Look toward Windows 10

Posted by Julia Robeck on February 4, 2015

What Microsoft is getting right with tablets–seamless synching between devices, more computing power, and accessories–and why Apple should go there too.

“The iPad is nearly 5 years old. That product, ever since, has continued to ride a thin dividing line between iPhones and Macs: mobile, and computers.

…Will there be both a 12-inch iPad and a 12-inch MacBook Air in 2015? If so, how will they co-exist? Could they be meant for different customers?

…the iPad needs a change. It needs something to ignite interest. It needs a few new ideas.

Microsoft — with its hardware, and with its upcoming Windows 10 operating system — is actually blazing a bold trail. One that Apple may actually be able to learn from.”

http://www.cnet.com/news/where-the-ipad-should-go-next-look-toward-windows-10/

Posted in mobile devices, technology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

research with social media

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on February 3, 2015

Doctoral Cohorts and Research using Social Media

Explore social media sites to find out what is the most pertinent “talk” in your scientific community. What are the latest trends and discussions, topics of research and interests. Most prominent social media sites, such as
LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/
Twitter, https://twitter.com/
Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/
Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/
Instagram, http://instagram.com/
use hashtags.
LinkedIn has “professional groups.”

Identify your hashtag strategy similarly to your keyword strategy when searching peer-reviewed articles

  E.g., if your interest is #principalship, you can seek channels and conversations by using it as a hashtag

  Search and subscribe to LinkedIn “Interests/Groups” and lurk or actively participate in the conversations.

  Consider start and maintenance of your own blog with your daily reflections on your research progress

  E.g., LinkedIn can be very much used as a blog, although you can subscribe for a free one such as Edublog

p. 141. Chapter 8 “Using Social Media in Research.”
Bell, J. (1999). Doing your research project: A guide for first-time researchers in education and social science (3rd ed.). Buckingham [England] ; Philadelphia: Open University Press. (Available on Google and at SCSU Library through ILL)

Crowdsourcing, social networking. Consider the following questions:

  1. What are your goals?
  2. Who do you want to reach?
  3. Why do you want to reach them?
  4. Which digital tool or platform will be most effective in enabling you to reach your goals?
  5. If you already spend time each day using social media for personal reasons, how much time are you able to set aside each day to use social media for research?
  6. at what time of day will you engage in social media? (time differences, if you are communicating globally)

the value of social media: Community, Content, Conversations.

 

Davis III, C.H.F., Deil-Amen, R., Rios-Aguilar, C., & González Canché, M.S. Social media and higher education: A literature review and research directions. Report printed by the University of Arizona and Claremont Graduate University. Accessed January 27, 2015 http://works.bepress.com/hfdavis/2/

 

Posted in Digital literacy, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, Library and information science, mobile apps, mobile learning, social media, technology literacy | Tagged: , | No Comments »