Posts Tagged ‘academic analytics’

Innovation, Infrastructure, and Digital Learning

Notes from the webinar:
What is Digital Learning

 

 

 

Technology is a metaphor for change, it is also a metaphor for risk

technology is a means of uncertainly reduction that is made possible by the cause-effect relationship upon which the technology is based.

technology innovation creates a kind of uncertainty in the minds of potential adopters as well as represent an opportunity for reduced uncertainty.

The Diffusion of Innovations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffusion_of_innovations

https://web.stanford.edu/class/symbsys205/Diffusion%20of%20Innovations.htm

diffusion of innovations

 

technology is disruptive

  • issues and impacts | response
  • organizational practice and process |  denial, anger
  • individual behaviors and preferences | bargaining
  • visualization: can I see me/us doing that | depression, acceptance

as per https://www.amazon.com/Death-Dying-Doctors-Nurses-Families/dp/1476775540

The key campus tech issues are no longer about IT (in the past e.g.: MS versus Apple). IT is the “easy part” of technology on campus. The challenges: people, planning policy, programs, priorities, silos, egos, and IT entitlements

How do we make Digital Learning compelling and safe for the faculty? provide evidence of impact, support, recognition and reward for faculty; communicate about effectiveness of and need for IT resources.

technology is not capital cost, it is operational cost. reoccurring.

Visualization:

underlying issues; can i do this? why should i do this? evidence of benefit?

http://www.sonicfoundry.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Green-PlusCaChange-EDUCAUSEReview-Sept2015.pdf

the more things change, the more things stay the same. new equilibrium.

change: from what did you do wrong to how do we do better. Use data as a resources, not as a weapon. there is a fear of trying, because there is no recognition or reward

Machiavelli: 1. concentrate your efforts 2. pick your issues carefully, know when to fight 3. know the history 4. build coalitions 5. set modest goals – and realistic 6. leverage the value of data (use it as resource not weapon) 7. anticipate personnel turnover 8. set deadlines for decisions

Colleagues,

We apologize for the short notice, but wanted to make you aware of the following opportunity: provide

From Ken Graetz at Winona State University:

As part of our Digital Faculty Fellows Program at WSU, Dr. Kenneth C. Green will be speaking this Thursday, March 22nd in Stark 103 Miller Auditorium from 11:30 to 12:30 on “Innovation, Infrastructure, and Digital Learning.” We will be streaming Casey’s talk using Skype Meeting Broadcast and you can join as a guest using the following link: Join the presentation. This will allow you to see and hear his presentation, as well as post moderated questions. By way of a teaser, here is a recent quote from Dr. Green’s blog, DigitalTweed, published by Inside Higher Ed:

“If trustees, presidents, provosts, deans, and department chairs really want to address the fear of trying and foster innovation in instruction, then they have to recognize that infrastructure fosters innovation.  And infrastructure, in the context of technology and instruction, involves more than just computer hardware, software, digital projectors in classrooms, learning management systems, and campus web sites. The technology is actually the easy part. The real challenges involve a commitment to research about the impact of innovation in instruction, and recognition and reward for those faculty who would like to pursue innovation in their instructional activities.”

Dr. Green is the founding director of The Campus Computing Project, the largest continuing study of the role of digital learning and information technology in American colleges and universities. Campus Computing is widely cited as a definitive source for data, information, and insight about IT planning and policy issues affecting higher education. Dr. Green also serves as the director, moderator, and co-producer of TO A DEGREE, the postsecondary success podcast of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He is the author or editor of some 20 books and published research reports and more than 100 articles and commentaries that have appeared in academic journals and professional publications. In 2002, Dr. Green received the first EDUCAUSE Award for Leadership in Public Policy and Practice. The EDUCAUSE award cites his work in creating The Campus Computing Project and recognizes his, “prominence in the arena of national and international technology agendas, and the linking of higher education to those agendas.”

Casey’s most recent TO A DEGREE podcasts are available now: Presidential Leadership in Challenging Times and Online’s Bottom Line.

Hope to see some of you online and please forward this invitation to anyone who might be interested.

Ken Graetz, PhD, Director of Teaching, Learning, and Technology Services, Winona State University, 507-429-3270

Library Counter project

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/06/library-counter-project/
short link: http://bit.ly/libcount

Library counters project from Plamen Miltenoff

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/05/key-performance-indicator-toolkit/comment-page-1/#comment-843

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Mark Sandford <msandford@colgate.edu>
Reply-To: lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Monday, February 5, 2018 at 7:32 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Using Raspberry Pi(s) w/ Sensors to Obtain Counts on Occupancy in a Library Space

Berika,

We’re currently experimenting/piloting with RPis, the RPi camera module, and this code:

https://github.com/WatershedArts/Footfall

It’s working, generally, but it does require a good bit of config tweaking to get it to accurately count. It also needs (I’ve discovered) a certain amount of distance between the door and the camera. We have very low ceilings at our doorways and a single person can span the entire frame which appears to confuse the software. All that being said, it’s very much worth looking into.

Analytics out of the box aren’t great. The only built in report is only the current day’s numbers, but it’s pretty easy to export data. We have Libinsight from Springshare and I’m working on pumping that data into their system. It is tricky because the system basically records two things: a timestamp, and a positive or negative integer depending on whether or not the traffic was going in or out. By default, no generic analytics system seems to understand that well enough to display it the way I’d like, so I may have to create some custom reports using d3.js or similar.

I’m using the Pi 2 and standard camera module from Adafruit. I’d be happy to answer questions.

——-

Mark Sandford  Systems Librarian Assistant Professor in the Libraries Colgate University Libraries

On Thu, Feb 1, 2018 at 1:23 PM, <berika.williams@tufts.edu> wrote:

Hi all,

We are trying to automate counting the number of people entering and leaving a

specific floor of our library. (The library is located in a multi-use

building.)

We’ve looked at the awesome “Measure the Future” code but we need analytics

more akin to a gate count versus tracking movement of people utilizing the

space.

Have any of you used raspberry pis or other technologies to do this type of

tracking?

If so, would you be willing to share your hardware/software setup with us and

also what type of data/analytics you’re getting back from the system?

Thank you,

Berika

——————

Berika Williams

Research and Instruction

Emerging Technologies and Web Librarian

Hirsh Health Sciences Library/ Tufts University

145 Harrison Ave, Boston MA 02111

http://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu

  1. 617 636-2454

Analytics and Data Mining in Education

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/934617/934617-6255144273688215555

Call For Chapters: Responsible Analytics and Data Mining in Education: Global Perspectives on Quality, Support, and Decision-Making

SUBMIT A 1-2 PAGE CHAPTER PROPOSAL
Deadline – June 1, 2017

Title:  Responsible Analytics and Data Mining in Education: Global Perspectives on Quality, Support, and Decision-Making

Synopsis:
Due to rapid advancements in our ability to collect, process, and analyze massive amounts of data, it is now possible for educators at all levels to gain new insights into how people learn. According to Bainbridge, et. al. (2015), using simple learning analytics models, educators now have the tools to identify, with up to 80% accuracy, which students are at the greatest risk of failure before classes even begin. As we consider the enormous potential of data analytics and data mining in education, we must also recognize a myriad of emerging issues and potential consequences—intentional and unintentional—to implement them responsibly. For example:

· Who collects and controls the data?
· Is it accessible to all stakeholders?
· How are the data being used, and is there a possibility for abuse?
· How do we assess data quality?
· Who determines which data to trust and use?
· What happens when the data analysis yields flawed results?
· How do we ensure due process when data-driven errors are uncovered?
· What policies are in place to address errors?
· Is there a plan for handling data breaches?

This book, published by Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, will provide insights and support for policy makers, administrators, faculty, and IT personnel on issues pertaining the responsible use data analytics and data mining in education.

Important Dates:

· June 1, 2017 – Chapter proposal submission deadline
· July 15, 2017 – Proposal decision notification
· October 15, 2017 – Full chapter submission deadline
· December 1, 2017 – Full chapter decision notification
· January 15, 2018 – Full chapter revisions due
++++++++++++++++++
more on data mining in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+mining

more on analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics