Posts Tagged ‘administrators. EDAD’

K12 IT leaders work with people

K-12 IT leaders need to work with people, not just tech

<https://www.educationdive.com/news/k-12-it-leaders-need-to-work-with-people-not-just-tech/555004/

My note: this is the first step toward the conclusion of my dissertation: the CIO in education must wear three hats: computer geek, educator and administrator.

District Administration reports.

Since edtech varies from district to district and state to state, it’s unlikely that an IT candidate will be up-to-speed on the current system in use. Alabama solves this problem by offering the Alabama Chief Technology Officer certification program.

It is critical for those in K-12 IT leadership to understand the unique customer service needs of the education industry. When technology doesn’t work, it throws a wrench into an entire day of learning. Educators need a fast fix and responsive service. Effective tech leaders will delegate by teaming up with tech-savvy teachers who can serve as school tech leaders. This strategy allows for an on-site tech expert to step in to put out fires before the tech expert arrives.

Former teachers can also make strong chief technology officers because they understand both tech and education. This allows them to build trust with the staff, which is a critical component to launching new technology initiatives.

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more on digital literacy for EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+edad

toxic leadership

The Mediation Role of Toxic Leadership in the Effect of Job Stress on Job Satisfaction
H. Tezcan Uysal Department of Management and Organization
Zonguldak Vocational College Bülent
Ecevit University, Turkey

(6) (PDF) The Mediation Role of Toxic Leadership in the Effect of Job Stress on Job Satisfaction. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/331249551_The_Mediation_Role_of_Toxic_Leadership_in_the_Effect_of_Job_Stress_on_Job_Satisfaction [accessed May 16 2019].

Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer

What’s the Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer?

Research from the Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) has been transferred to EDUCAUSE, including a report on the role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer and its differences and similarities to other higher ed IT tech executives.

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/1/the-center-for-higher-education-cio-studies-reports-2003-2018 Friday, January 18, 2019

The Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) was a nonprofit organization founded by Dr. Wayne A. Brown, dedicated to the education and development of technology leaders in higher education. CHECS produced the CIO Study, the Technology Leadership (TL) Study, the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Study and the Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study.

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) study provides information about higher education CIOs’ attributes, education, experience and effectiveness. The CIO study was conducted from 2003 to 2018. Find all the CIO reports here.

The Technology Leadership (TL) study surveyed those in the next organizational layer down from the CIO.  The TL study examines the demographics of the TL, where they have worked, and the activities they are undertaking to prepare themselves to become CIOs.  The TL study was study was conducted from 2009 to 2018. Find all the TL reports here.

The Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) study examines the demographics of the higher education CISO, the career route they have taken to their role, and the activities and attributes needed for a CISO according to the CISO and the CIO. The CISO study was study was conducted from 2014 to 2017. Find all the CISO reports here.

The Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study, 2018 canvassed CIOs, known CATOs and academic technology leaders, as well as deans and provosts to understand changes happening across institutions of higher education in academic technology.

shifting reality of the online landscape

State Systems Plot Major Online Growth

Public universities across the country are adjusting to the shifting reality of the online landscape. Despite similar goals, approaches vary widely.

Mark Lieberman March 20, 2019

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/03/20/how-public-university-systems-missouri-louisiana-and-more-plan

interviewed administrators at systems across the United States for a wide look at how the landscape is shifting.

The University of Missouri System last year signaled plans to increase its total enrollment from 75,000 to 100,000 by 2023. Administrators pointed to online education as a key driver of future growth.

In other ways, the Missouri system’s approach could look similar to Massachusetts’. Administrators in Missouri are pondering the creation of a separate entity within the system that would offer online programs to adult learners.

Administrators have ruled out purchasing or merging with an existing online apparatus, as Purdue University did with the for-profit Kaplan University to enrollment-expanding but controversial effect.

Senior administrators and board members at Louisiana State University began looking at online education in the early 2010s.

From 2016 to 2018, Sasha Thackaberry served as assistant vice president of academic technology, course production and alternative learning models at Southern New Hampshire University. Louisiana State hired her in February 2018 to lead its online growth; three months later, she was promoted from associate vice provost to vice provost of digital and continuing education.

When Kristina Johnson became chancellor of the State University of New York system in 2017, she challenged administrators to consider a wide range of possibilities for growing online capabilities. According to Tod Laursen, SUNY’s senior vice chancellor and provost, the system has just wrapped up an information-gathering process that will inform a soon-to-be-released request for proposals. Johnson has slated for this fall a major online learning initiative, the details of which are still being ironed out.

Colorado State University Online serves as an online program manager for the state system — distinct from Colorado State University Global, which has a separate faculty and governance structure, and tends to serve adults at an average age in their 30s. CSU Online, by contrast, tends to serve “less seasoned” students between 24 and 34 years old, according to Amy Smith, senior director of CSU Online.

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more on online education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

Micromanagement

Great Leadership isn’t about control. It’s about Empowering people.

Brigette Hyacinth

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/great-leadership-isnt-control-empowering-people-brigette-hyacinth/

5 Damaging Effects of Micromanagement

1.Decreased Productivity

2. Reduced Innovation

3. Lower Morale

4. High Staff Turnover

5. Loss of Trust

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more about leadership in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leadership

Depression and Anxiety Teenagers

By Karen Zraick  

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/20/health/teenage-depression-statistics.html

The survey found that 70 percent of teenagers saw mental health as a big issue. Fewer teenagers cited bullying, drug addiction or gangs as major problems; those from low-income households were more likely to do so.

Some psychologists have tied a growth in mental health issues among teenagers to increased social media use, academic pressure and frightening events like terror attacks and school shootings.

A study released in 2017 found that the number of children and adolescents admitted to children’s hospitals for thoughts of self-harm or suicide had more than doubled from 2008 to 2015, echoing trends in federal data.

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more about depression in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=depression

Where Do Teachers Get Their Ideas?

https://www.edweek.org/ew/section/multimedia/data-where-do-teachers-get-their-ideas.html

January 10, 2018

a September 2017 online survey from the Education Week Research Center of a nationally representative sample of more than 500 K-12 teachers.

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