Posts Tagged ‘Analytics and metrics’

library web page and heat map

Usability of the library web page

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Amy Kimura <amy.kimura@rutgers.edu>
Subject: [lita-l] Qualitative analytics tools

Hi everyone,

Is anyone out there using CrazyEgg, Hotjar, Mouseflow or the like as a source of analytic data?

If so, I’d love to hear about what you’re using, how you’re using it, what you’ve been able to get out of it. I’m convinced that it will be useful for informing content contributors about how their content is being (or more likely not being) consumed by users — but I’m particularly interested in other ways to utilize the tools and the data they provide.

Thanks so much! Amy

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Amy Kimura
Web Services Librarian, Shared User Services
Rutgers University Libraries
amy.kimura@rutgers.edu
p: 848.932.5920

My response to Amy:

In my notes: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/07/library-technology-conference-2017/

Here is the 2016 session and contact information to the three fellows, who did an excellent presentation not only how, but why exactly these tools:  http://sched.co/69f2

Here is the link to the 2017 session, which seems closest to your question. http://sched.co/953o Again, the two presenters most probably will be able to help you with your questions, if they have not seen already your posting on the LITA listserv and responded.

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CrazyEgg, Hotjar, Mouseflow




big data in ed

New Report Examines Use of Big Data in Ed

By Dian Schaffhauser  05/17/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/17/new-report-examines-use-of-big-data-in-ed.aspx

new report from the National Academy of Education “Big Data in Education,” summarizes the findings of a recent workshop held by the academy

three federal laws: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and the Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA).

over the last four years, 49 states and the District of Columbia have introduced 410 bills related to student data privacy, and 36 states have passed 85 new education data privacy laws. Also, since 2014, 19 states have passed laws that in some way address the work done by researchers.

researchers need to get better at communicating about their projects, especially with non-researchers.

One approach to follow in gaining trust “from parents, advocates and teachers” uses the acronym CUPS:

  • Collection: What data is collected by whom and from whom;
  • Use: How the data will be used and what the purpose of the research is;
  • Protection: What forms of data security protection are in place and how access will be limited; and
  • Sharing: How and with whom the results of the data work will be shared.

Second, researchers must pin down how to share data without making it vulnerable to theft.

Third, researchers should build partnerships of trust and “mutual interest” pertaining to their work with data. Those alliances may involve education technology developers, education agencies both local and state, and data privacy stakeholders.

Along with the summary report, the results of the workshop are being maintained on a page within the Academy’s website here.

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more on big data in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

IOLUG Fall 2016 Conference

IOLUG – Indiana Online Users Group

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
IOLUG Fall 2016 Conference – Let Our Powers Combine: Engage. Partner. Inspire

Friday, October 21, 2016

Indiana Wesleyan University North Campus
3777 Priority Way, Indianapolis, IN  46240

How can we join together to increase awareness of the value, impact and services provided by libraries and library professionals in the academic, public and online settings? The IOLUG Program Committee is inviting proposals around the theme of proving the value and worth of the library. Specifically, how are you demonstrating the value of your library? What emerging technologies are you using to display your contribution to your institution or community either online or in person? How can we work together to inspire a spirit of advocacy?

We encourage presentations that are practical, hands-on, and include take-awayable tools, techniques, and/or strategies that librarians can implement to improve their resources and services for students, patrons, faculty, etc. Consider the following topics:

  • Promoting open educational resources (OER) and affordable learning materials
  • Analytics and metrics
  • Supporting diversity
  • Improved service delivery and job performance
  • Digital media implementation
  • New library initiatives
  • Innovation and community engagement
  • Leadership

Please specify in your proposal whether users will be expected to bring their own devices, or if you will need the use of a computer lab.

Submit your proposal today!
Deadline is Friday, September 2
Get ideas from previous conferences at the IOLUG site.