Posts Tagged ‘analytics’

Smart Future: Knowledge Trends that will Change the World

As you may be aware that TERI is a global think-tank knowledge driven organisation working in the field of Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development. TERI is organising it’s one of the flagship event ICDL 2016 from

13 to 16 December, 2016 at India Habitat Center, Lodhi Road, New Delhi. The theme of the conference is “Smart Future: Knowledge Trends that will Change the World”. (URL: http://www.teriin.org/events/icdl/)

 

As we understand that in the current scenario all enterprises are heading towards Digital Transformation, which derives business value for an effective decision making process. To be a part of this transformation strategy, all stakeholders at various levels should be aware of certain pertinent components, which are mentioned below. This conference is a unique platform to brainstorm and network with leading speakers and digital luminaries. Some of the major thrust areas to be covered are:

 

  1. Innovation and Knowledge Management
  2. Big Data and Analytics
  3. Social Media and Analytics
  4. Internet of Things (IoT)

 

To get yourself and your team to engage in one of these issues, we would request you to kindly share your skills, expertise and experiences with audiences in this thought provoking and stimulating interactive platform of ICDL 2016.

 

For your reference and further information about this event, please refer to 1. Brochure http://www.teriin.org/events/icdl/pdf/Brochure.pdf

  1. Background paper

http://www.teriin.org/events/icdl/pdf/ICDL_BackgroundPaper/

 

Do write back to us for further queries, if any.

For further Information Contact:

Mr V V S Parihar

ICDL 2016 Secretariat

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) India Habitat Centre Complex, Lodhi Road, New Delhi-110003, India

Tel: +91 11 24682100 or 41504900

Fax: 24682144 Email: ICDL2016@teri.res.in, vijayvsp@teri.res.in

Website: http://www.teriin.org/events/icdl

big data and higher ed

Higher Ed Can Be a One-Two Punch

According to a recent survey, many colleges lack critical analytics skills to effectively leverage data.

More on analytics and big data in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

analytics in education

ACRL e-Learning webcast series: Learning Analytics – Strategies for Optimizing Student Data on Your Campus

This three-part webinar series, co-sponsored by the ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Committee, the Student Learning and Information Committee, and the ACRL Instruction Section, will explore the advantages and opportunities of learning analytics as a tool which uses student data to demonstrate library impact and to identify learning weaknesses. How can librarians initiate learning analytics initiatives on their campuses and contribute to existing collaborations? The first webinar will provide an introduction to learning analytics and an overview of important issues. The second will focus on privacy issues and other ethical considerations as well as responsible practice, and the third will include a panel of librarians who are successfully using learning analytics on their campuses.

Webcast One: Learning Analytics and the Academic Library: The State of the Art and the Art of Connecting the Library with Campus Initiatives
March 29, 2016

Learning analytics are used nationwide to augment student success initiatives as well as bolster other institutional priorities.  As a key aspect of educational reform and institutional improvement, learning analytics are essential to defining the value of higher education, and academic librarians can be both of great service to and well served by institutional learning analytics teams.  In addition, librarians who seek to demonstrate, articulate, and grow the value of academic libraries should become more aware of how they can dovetail their efforts with institutional learning analytics projects.  However, all too often, academic librarians are not asked to be part of initial learning analytics teams on their campuses, despite the benefits of library inclusion in these efforts.  Librarians can counteract this trend by being conversant in learning analytics goals, advantages/disadvantages, and challenges as well as aware of existing examples of library successes in learning analytics projects.

Learn about the state of the art in learning analytics in higher education with an emphasis on 1) current models, 2) best practices, 3) ethics, privacy, and other difficult issues.  The webcast will also focus on current academic library projects and successes in gaining access to and inclusion in learning analytics initiatives on their campus.  Benefit from the inclusion of a “short list” of must-read resources as well as a clearly defined list of ways in which librarians can leverage their skills to be both contributing members of learning analytics teams, suitable for use in advocating on their campuses.

my notes:

open academic analytics initiative
https://confluence.sakaiproject.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=75671025

where data comes from:

  • students information systems (SIS)
  • LMS
  • Publishers
  • Clickers
  • Video streaming and web conferencing
  • Surveys
  • Co-curricular and extra-curricular involvement

D2L degree compass
Predictive Analytics Reportitng PAR – was open, but just bought by Hobsons (https://www.hobsons.com/)

Learning Analytics

IMS Caliper Enabled Services. the way to connect the library in the campus analytics https://www.imsglobal.org/activity/caliperram

student’s opinion of this process
benefits: self-assessment, personal learning, empwerment
analytics and data privacy – students are OK with harvesting the data (only 6% not happy)
8 in 10 are interested in personal dashboard, which will help them perform
Big Mother vs Big Brother: creepy vs helpful. tracking classes, helpful, out of class (where on campus, social media etc) is creepy. 87% see that having access to their data is positive

librarians:
recognize metrics, assessment, analytics, data. visualization, data literacy, data science, interpretation

INSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT – N.B.

determine who is the key leader: director of institutional research, president, CIO

who does analyics services: institutional research, information technology, dedicated center

analytic maturity: data drivin, decision making culture; senior leadership commitment,; policy supporting (data ollection, accsess, use): data efficacy; investment and resourcefs; staffing; technical infrastrcture; information technology interaction

student success maturity: senior leader commited; fudning of student success efforts; mechanism for making student success decisions; interdepart collaboration; undrestanding of students success goals; advising and student support ability; policies; information systems

developing learning analytics strategy

understand institutional challenges; identify stakeholders; identify inhibitors/challenges; consider tools; scan the environment and see what other done; develop a plan; communicate the plan to stakeholders; start small and build

ways librarians can help
idenfify institu partners; be the partners; hone relevant learning analytics; participate in institutional analytics; identify questions and problems; access and work to improve institu culture; volunteer to be early adopters;

questions to ask: environmental scanning
do we have a learning analytics system? does our culture support? leaders present? stakeholders need to know?

questions to ask: Data

questions to ask: Library role

learning analytics & the academic library: the state of the art of connecting the library with campus initiatives

questions:
pole analytics library

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

literature

causation versus correlation studies. speakers claims that it is difficult to establish causation argument. institutions try to predict as accurately as possible via correlation, versus “if you do that it will happen what.”

++++++++++++

More on analytics in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=analytics&submit=Search

How StumbleUpon Works

What Might Surprise You About StumbleUpon

Users do not search for anything in particular; rather, they spend time on StumbleUpon for one reason only: to discover new content that matches up with their interests. After StumbleUpon users document their interests on the site, the only thing they have to do afterward is click the “Stumble” button – sometimes over and over again. StumbleUpon itself works completely based on user preference, based upon whether somebody gives your page the thumbs-up. The more “likes,” the more StumbleUpon will send your page out to other users.
Read more at http://www.business2community.com/online-marketing/might-surprise-stumbleupon-0684002#sojZYu7X4OLoUuhq.99