Disruptive Tech Trends

5 Disruptive Tech Trends That Could Dominate in 2016


Andres Cardenal (IoT). The Internet of Things

Tim Brugger (Big Data): In part because the world around us is becoming “connected” through a growing number of IoT sensors, mobile devices, and the world’s affinity for the Internet, the sheer volume of information available is already staggering.

Daniel B. Kline (endless payment): While subscriptions have always been a factor on the enterprise side of the software business, they’re now moving into the consumer end of things. The leader has been Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT), which has managed to move a large part of its Office customer base into a subscription model. 

Tim Green (budget smartphones): Zenfone 2 from Asus and the Moto G from Motorola.

Deep learning and Wearables

RE.WORK Deep Learning Summit, Boston

May 26-27, 2015
Boston, Massachusetts

Internet of Things Summit, Boston 2015

May 28, 2015 – May 29, 2015

Hyatt Regency Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

– See more at: https://www.crunchbase.com/event/internet-of-things-summit-boston-2015-2015528#sthash.cBVjBogG.dpuf

big data and education

Big Data is Finally Coming to Education Here’s What We’ve Learned So Far


Long lectures don’t work.

The best predictor of future course behavior is past course behavior.

Data from MOOCs suggest that one way to boost completion rates is to increase engagement early in the course.

Even in online courses, offline support is essential.


More IMS blog entries on Big Data:


big data history

A Bried History of BIG Data

Volume, Velocity, Variety

Business Intelligence

Internet of Things

privacy, security, intellectual property

mobile Internet


Super Mario gets artificial intelligence

Researchers create ‘self-aware’ Super Mario with artificial intelligence


A team of German researchers has used artificial intelligence to create a “self-aware” version of Super Mario who can respond to verbal commands and automatically play his own game.

Artificial Intelligence helps Mario play his own game

Students at the University of Tubingen have used Mario as part of their efforts to find out how the human brain works.

The cognitive modelling unit claim their project has generated “a fully functional program” and “an alive and somewhat intelligent artificial agent”.


Can Super Mario Save Artificial Intelligence?

The most popular approaches today focus on Big Data, or mimicking humansthat already know how to do some task. But sheer mimicry breaks down when one gives a machine new tasks, and, as I explained a few weeks ago, Big Data approaches tend to excel at finding correlations without necessarily being able to induce the rules of the game. If Big Data alone is not a powerful enough tool to induce a strategy in a complex but well-defined game like chess, then that’s a problem, since the real world is vastly more open-ended, and considerably more complicated.


free “big data” sources

The Free ‘Big Data’ Sources Everyone Should Know


Data.gov, click here.
US Census Bureau click here.
European Union Open Data Portal, click here.
Data.gov.uk, click here.
The CIA World Factbook, click here.
Healthdata.gov, click here.
NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre, click here.
Amazon Web Services public datasets, click here.
Facebook Graph, click here.
Gapminder, click here.
Google Trends, click here.
Google Finance, click here.
Google Books Ngrams, click here.
National Climatic Data Center, click here.
DBPedia, click here.
Topsy, click here.
Likebutton, click here.
New York Times, click here.
Freebase, click here.
Million Song Data Set, click here.

Big Data. Tracking Students’ Grades Minute-By-Minute: Help or Hindrance

Flanagan, L. (n.d.). Tracking Students’ Grades Minute-By-Minute: Help or Hindrance? MindShift. Retrieved May 12, 2014, from http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/05/tracking-students-grades-minute-by-minute-help-or-hindrance/
For all the data and feedback they provide, student information systems interfere with learning.
“School isn’t about learning. It’s about doing well.”
The singular focus on grades that these systems encourage turns learning into a competitive, zero-sum game for students.
My notes:
the parallel with the online grades systems at K12 is the Big Data movement at Higher Ed. Big Data must be about assisting teaching, not about determining teaching and instructors must be very well aware and very carefully navigating in this nebulous areas of assisting versus determining.
This article about quantifying management of teaching and learning in K12 reminds me the big hopes put on technocrats governing counties and economies in the 70s of the last centuries when the advent of the computers was celebrated as the solution of all our problems. Haven’t we, as civilization learned anything from that lesson?

Center for Democracy & Technology

Big Data and Privacy

April 17, 2014

Big data has been generating big hype for a while. In January, the White House jumped into the fray, launching a big data and privacy review. CDT participated in all three public workshops convened in connection with the review and submitted written comments.

CDT’s Big Data and Privacy Comments

In our comments, we focused on three main areas: applying the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) to both private sector and government big data programs; exploring technical measures such as de-identification to safeguard privacy; and reforming existing privacy laws, most notably the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, to account for rapid changes in the ways that digital data is collected, stored, and used.

CDT stressed that, as entities collect more data to offer innovative products and more efficient services, they must still be guided by purpose specification, consent, security, and the other elements of the FIPPs framework.

Government and Big Data

“Strong consensus is forming that the bulk collection of phone records should end.”

-Harley Geiger

The Administration says that it will end its bulk collection of telephony metadata, although the details of what will replace it remain unsettled. Meanwhile, CDT is pointing out that the laws the government has used to justify bulk collection are not limited just to phone records. Instead, they could be used to justify collection of location data, Internet browsing history, financial records, and more. CDT has been vocal in advocating the end of all forms of bulk collection, and we endorse the USA FREEDOM Act as the best legislation to do just that.

A report from the White House review is due before the end of April, but it is expected to present more questions than answers. In this complex and unsettled space, CDT will continue to work with companies and other stakeholders to develop workable approaches that will protect privacy while pursuing the benefits promised by advanced data analytics.

Check Out CDT’s New Website

CDT has launched a totally revamped website: www.cdt.org. It has a fresh new look and tools that should make our content more easily accessible. Thanks to our partners at iStrategy Labs for their creative and technical efforts on the new site.