I am including a couple whitepapers you can review and forward to all staff who may be curious about our teaching and learning tool and would be attending the demo on May 11th at 1.00pm

Please see the go to meeting instructions for our Bluepulse v1.5 walkthrough.

United States: +1 (312) 757-3126

Access Code: 822-849-653

As you mentioned faculty may be very interested in using Bluepulse, I wanted to include the link for our instructor video:

If you have any questions about the integration, training or implementation, please do not hesitate to email or call and as always I am more than happy to help.

Warm regards,

Nick Sankar

Bluepulse Account Manager


harvest students; feedback – anonymous way to ask questions. D2L surveys offer already this opportunity; Twitter and other the free options for polling apps give the same option, e.g. Polleverywhere gives a word cloud option

the follow up q/n as demonstrated is limited to 160 characters. Why?

i like that it compartmentalize the anonymity but I really ask myself: would SCSU faculty go to such length?

presumptions: non-tenured faculty is interested in the top layers students and wants to find out what works for them best. this loaded, since, if there ARE different learning styles, then what worked for the top layer might be exactly what did not work for the bottom layer, but this approach will gave the faculty a justification to keep stratifying students, instead of thinking of diverse ways to approach all layers. this part of sale, not pedagogy. sorry.

weakness; the entire presentation is trying to sell a product, which might be good for different campus, but not for SCSU, where faculty are overworked, the class load is so great that going to such details might be questionable.

exporting CSV for data massaging is not big deal. indeed the easy of this particular software is admirable, but if the faculty has time to go into such details, they can export the data from D2L or Google Forms and open it in SPSS

Greg’s question: mobility.

libraries and services. pole users without being tied to course. again, that all can be done with other services in the library. if the library cares about it at all.

Horizon Report 2015


Horizon Report > 2015 Higher Education Edition

Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption in Higher Education 6
Long-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for five or more years
> Advancing Cultures of Change and Innovation 8
> Increasing Cross-Institution Collaboration 10
Mid-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for three to five years
> Growing Focus on Measuring Learning 12
> Proliferation of Open Educational Resources 14
Short-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for the next one to two years
> Increasing Use of Blended Learning 16
> Redesigning Learning Spaces 18
Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption in Higher Education 20
Solvable Challenges: Those that we understand and know how to solve
> Blending Formal and Informal Learning 22
> Improving Digital Literacy 24
Difficult Challenges: Those we understand but for which solutions are elusive
> Personalizing Learning 26
> Teaching Complex Thinking 28
Wicked Challenges: Those that are complex to even define, much less address
> Competing Models of Education 30
> Rewarding Teaching 32
Important Developments in Educational Technology for Higher Education 34

25 Smart #SocialMedia Tips For #EdLeaders


5 Learning Strategies

  1. Track relevant hashtags on twitter (I use Hootsuite)

  2. Use a reader to scan key blogs (I switched from iGoogle to Ustart & Feedly)

  3. Like causes/companies and track on Facebook

  4. Learn about your audience and growth  (we use Sprout Social and Google Analytics)

  5. Open a doc for good question you receive; use for future blogs

5 Impact Strategies

  1. Blog at least weekly about what you learn

  2. Tweet 5-10/day about what’s catching your attention

  3. Follow people doing good work

  4. Use hashtags/handles when you tweet

  5. Capture contacts in a CRM database for easy sharing

5 Leadership Strategies

  1. Write a weekly staff blast

  2. Publish a weekly community blast

  3. Make contact information available publically

  4. Create multiple points of entry

  5. Create opportunities for discussions and feedback

5 Brand-Building Strategies

  1. Use simple crisp graphics

  2. Create a clean easy to navigate homepage

  3. Add Facebook & Twitter icons to homepage

  4. Blog weekly and make it easy to share

  5. Keep branding between all channels cohesive

5 Survival Strategies

  1. Carve out learning and sharing hour every morning

  2. Don’t obsess the rest of the day

  3. Haters will hate; pick your battles

  4. Clear your inbox twice daily; flag/prioritize follow ups

  5. Turn it all off and go for a walk