Posts Tagged ‘BYOD’

instruments and methods for formative assessment

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Open Discussion: Instruments and Methods for Formative Assessment: by invitation of teachers from Plovdiv region |  Тема: Инструменти и методи за актуални училищни занятия

Where | Къде: СУ „Димитър Матевски“  https://goo.gl/maps/rojNjE3dk4s and online ( виртуално)
When | Кога: 2. май, 2018, 14 часа |  May 2, 2018, 2PM local time (Bulgaria)
Who | Кой: преподаватели и педагози  |  teachers and faculty
How | Как: използвайте “обратна връзка” за споделяне на вашите идеи  | use the following hashtag for backchanneling #BGtechEd

Plovdiv U recording available here

short link: http://bit.ly/teachassess

open URL on cell phone

qr code formative assessment event

Live stream:
https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/
and recording available
(предаване на живо и запис)

https://youtu.be/oYBtJSzUvrk

  1. Intro | Представяне – 5мин.
    Who are we (please share short intro about your professional interests) | Кои сме ние: споделете накратко професионалните си интереси (използвайте “comment” section под този блог)
    http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
  2. Plan | Защо сме се събрали? Представяне на плана. – 5-10мин.
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/15/ed-leadership-and-edtech/
    Edtch why | защо учебни технологии? how to choose edtech | как избираме технологии? who chooses/decided | кой решава кои технологии?
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/02/09/collaborative-tools/
    virtual collaborative board | да се срещнем тук: https://www.notebookcast.com/en/board/showboard/fw56dmgj/
  3. Reality Check (before we do tech) | минута за откровение (преди да започнем с технологии):
    who is our audience | кого учим/обучаваме?
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/21/in-memoriam-avicii/
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/17/edtech-implementation-fails/
    why technology application fails | защо се проваля използването на технологии в обучението?
    Understanding Purpose | какъв е смисълът
    Insufficient Modeling of Best Practices | недостатъчен или несподелен опит
    Bad First Impressions | лоши първи впечатления
    Real-World Usability Challenges | ежедневни проблеми
    The Right Data to Track Progress | кои данни определят успеха
    Share your thoughts for the fails | Сподели твоите мисли за провала

Тема1. Сравняване на Kahoot, Edpuzzle и Apester –  1-1, 1/2 час продължителност
Topic 1: A comparison of Kahoot, Apester and EdPuzzle

definitions | термини : BYOD (BYOx), flipped classroom, formative assessment (vs summative assessment)

Kahoot (https://kahoot.it/) – 10 мин.
 kahoot
Apester (https://apester.com/ )– 10-15мин.
 apester
    • Представяне | short demonstration
    • Споделяне на опит | ideas and experience exchange.
      Comparison to other tools (e.g. flipped classroom advantage to Kahoot; difference from EdPuzzle, similarities to EdPuzzle) | съпоставяне с други инструменти: например, обърната класна стая – предимство пред Кахут; разлики и прилики с ЕдПъзил и тн)

Edpuzzle (https://edpuzzle.com )– 10 – 15мин.
 edpuzzle
    • Представяне | short demonstration
    • Edpuzzle виртуална класна стая | interactive virtual classroom
    • Създаване на акаунт | account creation and building of learning objects
      Comparison to other tools (e.g. flipped classroom advantage to Kahoot; difference from EdPuzzle, similarities to EdPuzzle) | съпоставяне с други инструменти: например, обърната класна стая – предимство пред Кахут; разлики и прилики с Еиптстър и тн)

https://edpuzzle.com/assignments/5ad4cad48f4df34107c58bd0/watch

Тема 2. Виртуална реалност в учебния процес – теория и практика-  1-1, 1/2 час продължителност
Topic 2. Virtual reality in teaching and learning – theory and hands-on

When a student is brilliant on the street corner but falling asleep in class, something is wrong with the schooling system
Ако учащ се е страхотен на ъгъла на улицата, но се проваля или заспива в клас, тогава нещо е грешно с учебната система
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/17/education-teched-frenemies/

VR can be inexpensive and effective | Виртуална / разширена реалност може да бъде ефикасна и ефективна: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/26/teaching-virtual-reality/

  1. Кратък теоретичен преглед на видео 360 – 10 мин

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/2811/2811-6391674579739303939

Definitions for VR/AR/MR | дефиниции на:  виртуална реалност; разширена реалност; смесена реалност
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/03/21/t4tl-games-and-vr-library/

  1. Практически опит с видео 360 – 25 – 30 мин
  • Заснемане с камера
  • Редактиране на заснетия материал и възможности за интерактивност
  1. Дискусия относно методиката на приложение в учебния процес
  2. По избор – разговор с Марк Гил от Щатския университет Сейнт Клауд и демонстрация на виртуална реалност в учебния процес – 10-15 мин
  3. По избор –
    1. gaming and gamification and the role of VR and V360
      http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/
    2. digital storytelling and the role of VR and V360 | цифрово разказване и ролята на ВР и В360: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/
      Дискусии в тази ФБ група | Discussions welcome here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/SCSUDigitalStorytelling/

#3 from the following blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/17/practical-about-vr-and-ar-in-schools/ (go beyond storytelling)

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Additional Information |  Дпълнителна литература/информация

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/02/22/formative-assessment-ideas/

Formative Assessment Tools:  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/13/formative-assessment-tools/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/12/09/formative-assessment/

mobile apps education

5 questions to ask before your university goes mobile

Here’s how to evaluate the potential for mobile solutions

Before they set foot in their first class, incoming college students face a maze of requirements and resources that will be critical to their success. So-called “student supports” abound. Yet forty percent of first-year students don’t return the following year, and a growing number report information overload as they navigate campus life amid newfound independence.

The nine in 10 undergraduates who own smartphones are probably familiar with the xkcd about it. College-aged Americans check their devices more than 150 times per day. So it should be no surprise that a growing body of research suggests that mobile solutions can play a critical role in enhancing the student experience.

1. Is the mobile app native?
We’ve all had the frustrating experience of using a smartphone to navigate a page that was designed for a computer. But when designing native mobile apps, developers start with the small screen, which leads to simpler, cleaner platforms that get rid of the clutter of the desktop browsing experience.

As smartphones overtake laptops and desktops as the most popular way for young people to get online, native design is critical for universities to embrace.

2. Is there a simple content management system?

It’s also critical to explore whether mobile apps integrate with an institution’s existing LMS, CMS, and academic platforms. The most effective apps will allow you to draw upon and translate existing content and resources directly into the mobile experience.
My note: this is why it is worth experimenting with alternatives to LMS, such as Facebook Groups: they allow ready-to-use SIMPLE mobile interface.

3. Does it allow you to take targeted action?

At-risk or disengaged students often require more targeted communication and engagement which, if used effectively, can prevent them falling into those categories in the first place.

Unlike web-based tools, mobile apps should not only communicate information, but also generate insights and reports, highlighting key information into how students use the platform.

4. Does it offer communication and social networking opportunities?

Teenagers who grew up with chatbots and Snapchat expect instant communication to be part of any online interaction. Instead of making students toggle between the student affairs office and conversations with advisors, mobile platforms that offer in-app messaging can streamline the experience and keep users engaged.

5. Does it empower your staff?

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more on mobile in education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+education

best practices in online proctoring

To catch a cheat: Best practices in online proctoring

As online education expands, students are bringing old-fashioned cheating into the digital age

According to the latest report from Babson Survey Research Group, nearly 6.5 million American undergraduates now take at least one course online

1. Listen to students and faculty. Every college, university, or online-learning provider has a different approach to online learning. At Indiana University, where more than 30 percent of students take at least one online course, the online education team has launched Next.IU, an innovative pilot program to solicit feedback from the campus community before making any major edtech decision. By soliciting direct feedback from students and faculty, institutions can avoid technical difficulties and secure support before rolling out the technology campus-wide.

2. Go mobile. Nine in 10 undergraduates own a smartphone, and the majority of online students complete some coursework on a mobile device. Tapping into the near-ubiquity of mobile computing on campus can help streamline the proctoring and verification process. Rather than having to log onto a desktop, students can use features like fingerprint scan and facial recognition that are already integrated into most smartphones to verify their identity directly from their mobile device.

For a growing number of students, mobile technology is the most accessible way to engage in online coursework, so mobile verification provides not only a set of advanced security tools, but also a way for universities to meet students where they are.

3. Learn from the data. Analytical approaches to online test security are still in the early stages. Schools may be more susceptible to online “heists” if they are of a certain size or administer exams in a certain way, but institutions need data to benchmark against their peers and identify pain points in their approach to proctoring.

In an initial pilot with 325,000 students, for instance, we found that cheating rose and fell with the seasons—falling from 6.62 percent to 5.49 percent from fall to spring, but rising to a new high of 6.65 percent during the summer.

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more on proctoring in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proctoring

Virtualization and BYOD

How Virtualization and BYOD Help Students Learn Anywhere, Anytime

http://thejournal.com/Articles/2015/08/10/How-Virtualization-and-BYOD-Help-Students-Learn-Anywhere-Anytime-on-Any-Device.aspx

there’s nothing done with technology in the school that can’t be done from anywhere and on any device. This has given students and teachers total mobility.

If you have a 1-to-1 initiative, you’ve given students a computer, and when you allow them on your network, you’re going to have all the risks associated with that: corruptions, viruses and other problems that you have to support.

You bring your device, log in with credentials, and now we will run a virtual desktop and you will have, in a secure environment, access to your applications, your files and our network printers, just like if all that had been locally installed on a notebook computer that you had gotten off of a cart.

 

 

Gregory, S. (2015). Virtual World, Varsity Sport. Time, 185(12), 44.

http://time.com/3759634/virtual-world-varsity-sport/

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dmih%26AN%3d101753558%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Much like the way athletic-gear companies such as Nike and Adidas infiltrated traditional scholastic sports, video-game companies are helping underwrite the college gaming explosion. Riot Games, creator of League of Legends, is offering $360,000 in total scholarship money toplayers who make this year’s collegiate Final Four, more than tripling last year’s prize

My note: recommendation to LRS gaming committee. Can Eric be the LRS rep who can seek collecting an adhoc SCSU team? as per http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/19/recommendations-for-games-and-gaming-at-lrs/
If we to meet Dennis, Jim and/or Susantha, as recommended by Mark Vargas, the conversation needs to go that direction. Matt Barton definitely will be interested.
If we to consider the second and third higher level (how to gamify the educational process) or the educational methodology of gaming, I think we have to prepare the argument at LRS (as recommended by someone with a terminal degree in education or at least strong interest in pedagogy).

More on gaming at IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

more on gamification at IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

 

Recommendations for games and gaming at LRS

Gaming and Gamification in academic and library settings (paper)
Short URL: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re 

Based on the literature regarding games, gaming, gamification, game-based learning, and serious games, several clear trends emerge:

  1. Gaming and gamification in the sense of game-based learning is about using games and game-like tactics in the education process, for greater engagement and better learning outcomes. However, this is only the first level of such initiative. The second and higher level is about involving students in the game-building and gamification of the learning process (as per Vygotsky’s Zone of…) thus achieving student-centered and experiential learning.
  2. When hosting games and gaming in any library, “in-person” or electronic/online games are welcome but not sufficient to fulfill their promise, especially in an academic library. Per (1), an academic library has the responsibility to involve students and guide them in learning how to engage in the building process required in true game-based learning.
  3. Game-based learning, gaming and gamification in particular, in educational (academic library) settings must consider mobile devices and the BYOD movement in particular as intrinsic parts of the entire process. Approaching the initiative primarily by acquiring online “in-person” games, or game consoles has the same limited educational potential as only hosting games, rather than elevating the students to full guided engagement with game-based learning. If public relations and raised profile are the main goals for the academic library, such an approach is justified. If the academic library seeks to maximize the value of game-based learning, then the library must consider: a. gaming consoles, b. mobile devices as part of a BYOD initiative and c. cloud-based / social games, such as MineCraft, SimCity etc.
  4. Design for game-based learning, gaming and gamification in educational (academic library) settings must include multiple forms of assessment and reward, e.g. badges, leaderboards and/or certificates as an intrinsic part of the entire process. Merely hosting games in the academic library cannot guarantee true game-based learning. The academic library, as the forefront of a game-based learning initiative on campus, must work with faculty on understanding and fine tuning badges and similar new forms of assessment and reward, as they effectively implement large scale game-based learning, focused on the students’ learning gains.

Recommendations for LRS

  1. In regard to LRS, the gaming and gamification process must be organized and led by faculty, including housing and distributing the hardware, software and applications, when needed.
  2. The attached paper and the respective conclusions summarized in four points demand educational and experiential background, which is above the limits of the LRS staff. In addition, the LRS staff has clearly admitted that the pedagogical value of gaming and gamification is beyond their interest. This recommendation is not contradicting to the fact and opportunity for LRS staff to participate in the process and contribute to the process; it just negates the possibility of staff mandating and leading the process, since it will keep the gaming and gamification process on a very rudimentary level.
  3. The process must be further led by faculty with a terminal degree in education (Ph.D.) and experience in the educational field, since, as proved by the attached paper and 4 point conclusion, the goal is not a public-library type of hosting activities, but rather involving students in a pedagogically-sound creative process, with the respective opportunity for assessment and future collaboration with instructors across campus. This recommendation is not contradicting the fact and opportunity for LRS library faculty to participate actively in the process and contribute to the process. It just safeguards from restricting the process to the realm of “public-library” type of hosting activities, but failing to elevate them to the needs of an academic campus and connecting with instructors across campus.
  4. This conclusions adhere to and are derived from the document recommended by the LRS dean, discussed and accepted by LRS faculty in 2013 about new trends and directions in academic libraries, namely diversification of LRS faculty; breaking from the traditional library mold of including faculty from different disciplines with different opinions and ideas.

BYOD

The Brutal Authenticity Of BYOD

http://www.teachthought.com/trends/byod-is-shortest-path-to-student-centered-learning/

By allowing students to bring in their own devices for learning–rather than insisting that they learn both content and device in school–there is an important opportunity to connect with not just their personal lives, but their natural way of doing things.

Equity

While there are students who badly want technology and can’t afford even the $50, that doesn’t seem to be a strong argument against BYOD adoption, especially in light of what it costs—in time and money—to purchase, train, integrate, and maintain—state-funded, district-purchased, school-assigned devices. This is where schools, local organizations, and communities can step in.

Money and Learning

In the United States there can be a tendency to throw money at problems that are not fully understood. As a nation, America lags behind internationally, the “learning market” being one of the few markets proving evasive in lieu of continued effort, struggle, and spending.

More on BYOD in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=byod

11 Sample Education BYOT Policies To Help You Create Your Own

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/11-sample-education-byot-policies-to-help-you-create-your-own

The 6 Technologies That Will Change the Face of Education

Will students be wearing their tech in virtual classrooms in five years? Wearable devices, adaptive technologies, and the Internet of Things are just some of the new tech researchers say is shaping the near future of higher education.

In 1 Year or Less: BYOD and the flipped classroom.

“Employers and higher education institutions are finding that when given the opportunity to choose their device, users are saved from the effort and time needed to get accustomed to new devices and can therefore accomplish tasks with more ease and efficiency.”

“Flipped learning is seen as especially suited for higher education because the rearranging of class time gives students in large introductory lecture courses more opportunity to engage and interact with their peers.”

In 2-3 Years: Makerspaces and wearable devices.

Makerspaces have the “benefit of engaging learners in creative, higher-order problem solving through hands-on design, construction and iteration.”

“Wearable technology is poised to see significant growth in the coming years, spurring experimentation in higher education because the demand for wearables is seen to be coming in large part from college-aged students.”

In 4-5 Years: Adaptive technologies and the Internet of Things.

“Adaptive technology is seen as a means to break free of a “one-size-fits-all” approach to education and is suited well for online and hybrid learning environments, “where student activities are conducted virtually and can be monitored by software and tracking applications.”

The Internet of Things pushes information to learners from their surroundings. “For instance, a learner exploring a city with a rich historical past can explore their environment through an architectural, political, or biological lens, depending on how the surroundings are equipped.”

From the NMC Horizon Report 2015: Higher Education Edition

http://campustechnology.com/Articles/2015/02/11/The-6-Technologies-That-Will-Change-the-Face-of-Education.aspx?Page=1

mobile learning at schools

Mobile Learning: Resource Roundup

http://www.edutopia.org/article/mobile-learning-resources
Smartphones, tablets, e-readers — today’s students have a variety of mobile technologies at their fingertips. Here’s a look at some mobile-learning resources from Edutopia and around the web.

BYOD

How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/01/how-byod-programs-can-fuel-inquiry-learning/

Inquiry-based learning grounded in authentic projects go hand in hand with BYOD.

This shift allows teachers to address issues of digital citizenship like privacy, respecting others’ work, and standing up to improper uses on a daily basis as they arise.

“If they’re using that laptop in the classroom that has so much power and another kid is using a smartphone that doesn’t have quite that power or screen real estate, it requires collaboration,”

 

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