Posts Tagged ‘digital humanities’

digital humanities workshop

***”Culture & Technology” – European Summer University in Digital
Humanities (ESU DH C & T) 19th to 29th of July, University of Leipzig*
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/

As ESU DH C & T is a member of the International Digital Humanities
Training Network courses taken at the Summer University are eligible for
transfer credit towards the University of Victoria Graduate Certificate
in DH (see http://www.uvic.ca/humanities/english/graduate/graduate-certificates/dhum-certificate/index.php).

The Summer University takes place across 11 whole days. The intensive
programme consists of workshops, public lectures, regular project
presentations, a poster session, and a panel discussion.

The *workshop programme* is composed of the following thematic strands:

– XML-TEI encoding, structuring and rendering
– Compilation, Annotation und Analysis of Written Text Corpora. Introduction to Methods and Tools

– Comparing Corpora
– Digital Editions and Editorial Theory: Historical Texts and Documents
– Searching Linguistic Patterns in Large Text Corpora for Digital Humanities Research
– Lexicometric text analysis using CLARIN-D Webservices and R
– Stylometry
– Spoken Language and Multimodal Corpora
– Digital Lexica, Terminological Databases and Encyclopaedias: Contents, Structures and Formats
– Exploring art and technology within contemporary network culture. A close look at net art, digital art curation and its impact on the culture heritage sector
– From Text to Map. Modeling Historical Humanities Data in Mapping

Environments
– Project Management
– Data management for the humanities: from data warehousing to legal and ethical implication
– Digital Research Infrastructures in the Humanities: How to Use, Build and Maintain Them

Workshops are normally structured in such a way that participants can either take the two blocks of one workshop or two blocks from different workshops. The number of participants in each workshop is limited to 10. For more information see:
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/node/621
The Summer University is directed at 60 participants from all over Europe and beyond. It wants to bring together (doctoral) students, young scholars and academics from the Arts and Humanities, Library Sciences, Social Sciences, Engineering and Computer Sciences as equal partners to an interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge and experience in a multilingual and multicultural context and thus create the conditions for future project-based cooperations and network-building across the borders of disciplines, countries, languages and cultures.

The Summer University seeks to offer a space for the discussion and acquisition of new knowledge, skills and competences in those computer technologies which play a central role in Humanities Computing and which determine every day more and more the work done in the Humanities and Cultural Sciences, as well as in publishing, libraries, and archives, to name only some of the most important areas. The Summer University aims at integrating these activities into the broader context of the Digital Humanities, which pose questions about the consequences and implications of the application of computational methods and tools to cultural artefacts of all kinds.

In all this the Summer University aims at confronting the so-called Gender Divide , i.e. the under-representation of women in the domain of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in Germany and Europe. But, instead of strengthening the hard sciences as such by following the way taken by so many measures which focus on the so-called STEM disciplines and try to convince women of the attractiveness and importance of Computer Science or Engineering, the Summer University relies on the challenges that the Humanities with their complex data and their wealth of women represent for Computer Science and Engineering and
the further development of the latter, on the overcoming of the boarders between the so-called hard and soft sciences and on the integration of Humanities, Computer Science and Engineering.

As the Summer University is dedicated not only to the acquisition of knowledge and skills, but wants also to foster community building and networking across disciplines, languages and cultures, countries and continents, the programme of the Summer School features also communal coffee breaks, communal lunches in the refectory of the university, and a rich cultural programme (thematic guided tours, visits of archives, museums and exhibitions, and communal dinners in different parts of Leipzig).

For all relevant information please consult the Web-Portal of the European Summer School in Digital Humanities “Culture & Technology”: http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/ which will be continually updated and integrated with more information as soon as it becomes available.

For questions about the European Summer University please use esu_ct@uni-leipzig.de
With best regards, Elisabeth Burr

Prof. Dr. Elisabeth Burr
Lehrstuhl Französische / frankophone und italienische Sprachwissenschaft
Institut für Romanistik
Universität Leipzig
Beethovenstr. 15
D-04107 Leipzig
http://home.uni-leipzig.de/burr/
http://www.dhd2016.de/
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/ESU_C_T/
http://www.culingtec.uni-leipzig.de/quebec/
http://www.uni-leipzig.de/gal2010
http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~burr/JISU

big data and the government

What can the government do about big data fairness?

https://fcw.com/articles/2016/05/23/big-data-fairness.aspx

At a Ford Foundation conference dubbed Fairness by Design, officials, academics and advocates discussed how to address the problem of encoding human bias in algorithmic analysis. The White House recently issued a report on the topic to accelerate research into the issue.

The FTC released two studies on how big data is used to segment consumers into profiles and interests.

U.S. CTO Megan Smith said the government has been “creating a seat for these techies,” but that training future generations of data scientists to tackle these issues depends on what we do today. “It’s how did we teach our children?” she said. “Why don’t we teach math and science the way we teach P.E. and art and music and make it fun?”

“Ethics is not just an elective, but some portion of the main core curriculum.”

more on big data in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

digital humanities for librarians

Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: April 4-29, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/112-digital-humanities.php

Digital humanities (DH) has been heralded as the next big thing in humanities scholarship and universities have been creating initiatives and new positions in this field. Libraries, too, have moved to create a presence in the digital humanities community, setting up centers and hiring librarians to staff them. This course is designed as an introduction for librarians or library school students who have little or no exposure to DH and wish to be better positioned to offer DH support or services in a library setting. Participants will read and discuss DH scholarship, learn about frequently-used software, and think about why and how libraries and librarians engage DH. While I will encourage participants to explore more complex computing approaches (and I will support those who do as best I can), this course does not presuppose computing skills such as programming or use of the command line and will not ask participants to do much more than upload files to websites or install and use simple programs. Participants should have an interest and background in humanities scholarship and humanities librarianship and while the readings will focus on activities in the United States, our discussions can be more geographically wide-ranging.

Objectives:

– A basic knowledge of what digital humanities is and how it effects scholarship in the humanities disciplines.

– Exposure to core tools and approaches used by digital humanists.

– An understanding of how libraries and librarians have been involved with digital humanities.

– Critical engagement with the role of librarians and libraries in digital humanities.

This class has a follow-up, Introduction to Text Encoding

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/133-text-encoding.php

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.”

Read an interview with John Russell about this class:

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=769

You can register in this course through the first week of instruction (as long as it is not full). The “Register” button on the website goes to our credit card payment gateway, which may be used with personal or institutional credit cards. (Be sure to use the appropriate billing address). If your institution wants us to send a billing statement or wants to pay using a purchase order, please contact us by email to make arrangements: inquiries@libraryjuiceacademy.com

Introduction to Text Encoding

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: May 2-27, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

This course will introduce students to text encoding according to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. Why should you care about text encoding or the TEI Guidelines? The creation of digital scholarly texts is a core part of the digital humanities and many digital humanities grants and publications require encoding texts in accordance with the TEI Guidelines. Students in this course will learn about the use-cases for text encoding and get a basic introduction to the principles of scholarly editing before moving on to learning some XML basics and creating a small-scale TEI project using the XML editor oXygen. We will not cover (beyond the very basics) processing TEI, and students interested in learning about XSLT and/or XQuery should turn to the LJA courses offered on those subjects. Participants should have some experience with digital humanities, as this course is intended as a follow up to the Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians course.

Objectives:

  • A basic understanding of digital scholarly editing as an academic activity.
  • Knowledge of standard TEI elements for encoding poetry and prose.
  • Some engagement with more complex encoding practices, such as working with manuscripts.
  • An understanding of how librarians have participated in text encoding.
  • Deeper engagement with digital humanities practices.

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.” Interview with John Russell

Course Structure

This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional synchronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.

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Spatial Data Analyst & Curator

University Libraries / U-Spatial

University of Minnesota

 

Overview

The University of Minnesota Libraries and U-Spatial (https://uspatial.umn.edu/) seek a knowledgeable and proactive Spatial Data Analyst & Curator to advance the Libraries’ efforts in the areas of geospatial projects, geospatial data curation and management, and digital spatial humanities. Residing in the John R. Borchert Map Library, the Spatial Data Analyst & Curator works under the management and direction of the University Libraries, which holds institutional responsibility for supporting the products and processes of scholarship through the collection, provisioning, and preservation of information resources in all formats and media. As such, the work of the Spatial Data Analyst & Curator uses a life-cycle data management approach to serve the specific needs of the spatial data creator/user community while ensuring that processes and methods employed are strongly aligned with enterprise strategies and systems.

Required Qualifications include a Master’s degree in library/information science from an American Library Association accredited library school, GIS-related field, or equivalent combination of advanced degree and relevant experience, as well as experience with geographical information systems, including/especially Esri’s ArcGIS software, experience with scripting languages, such as Python or JavaScript, and experience with metadata creation, schema, and management.

 

For complete description, qualifications and to apply, go to: http://z.umn.edu/ulib362

 

The University of Minnesota is an Equal Opportunity Educator and Employer.

 

 

Ryan Mattke

Head, John R. Borchert Map Library

University of Minnesota
S-76 Wilson Library

309 19th Ave South

Minneapolis, MN 55455

Email: matt0089@umn.edu

Web: http://www.lib.umn.edu/borchert

Phone: 612.624.5757
ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8816-9289

EADH

The European Association for Digital Humanities

http://eadh.org/

More on Digital Humanities in this blog:

Digital Humanities

The Digital Humanities network on Twitter

digital storytelling

Stories are for sorting and storing
http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

> Willard,

>

> The post 29.126 has been niggling at me for days. I originally want to

> reply with a simple observation that the appeal to storytelling is

> cast in such a way to avoid the complications of narration’s relation

> to narrative (the telling and the told; shown and said). But it was

> the theme of “borrowing” from one domain by another that leads me to

> recall a counter-narrative where there is no need to borrow between

> domains since the military-industrial-entertainment complex is one entity.

>

> I contend that fundamental to human interaction is narration:

> attentiveness to how stories are related. Stories are for sorting and

> storing. *Sometimes this soothes paranoia induced by too much

> linearity.*

>

> A while ago (1996), I explored recursivity and narrativity. My

> starting point was the ability to ask questions (and learn from one’s

> bodily reactions). The musings may or may not have military relevance.

> Judge for

> yourselves:

>

> <quote>

>

> Pedagogical situations are sensory. They are also interpersonal.

> Because they are sensory this makes even learning by oneself interpersonal.

> Egocentric speech is like a dialogue between the senses. In

> Vygotsky’s and Luria’s experiments, children placed in problem-solving

> situations that were slightly too difficult for them displayed egocentric speech.

> One could consider these as self-induced metadiscursive moments. The

> self in crisis will disassociate and one’s questionning becomes the

> object of a question.

>

> Not only is the human self as a metabeing both fracturable and

> affiliable in itself, it is also prone to narrativity. That is, the

> human self will project its self-making onto the world in order to

> generate stories from sequences and to break stories into recombinant

> sequences. Its operations on signs are material practices with consequences for world-making.

>

> The fracturable affiliable self calls for reproductive models suitable

> to the interactions of multi-sensate beings, models that render dyads

> dialectical, questionable, answerable. Narrativity understood

> dialectically does not merely mean making sequences or strings of

> events into stories but also stories into things, strung together for

> more stories. From such an understanding, emerge non-dyadic

> narratives of reproduction, narratives where a thing-born transforms

> itself into an event, comes to understand itself as a process.

>

> </quote>

>

> http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

>

> Funny to consider that those remarks were based in a consideration of

> language and feedback mechanisms. Make me think that the storytelling

> as “potent form of emotional cueing” may be directed to undesired

> responses such as greater self-reflexivity. And depending on how they

> are parsed, Hollywood films can contribute to undesired responses

> including escape. 🙂

>

> Francois Lachance, Scholar-at-large

> http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance

>

> to think is often to sort, to store and to shuffle: humble, embodied

> tasks

>

> On Mon, 29 Jun 2015, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>> Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi, in “The Convergence of the Pentagon and

>> Hollywood” (Memory Bytes: History, Technology, and Digital Culture, ed.

>> Rabinovitz and Geil, 2004), describes in some detail the adoption by

>> the U.S. military of the entertainment industry’s storytelling

>> techniques implemented by means of simulation. This chapter follows

>> on from her excellent “Simulating the Unthinkable: Gaming Future War

>> in the 1950s and 1960s”, Social Studies of Science 30.2 (2000). In

>> the 2004 piece she describes a U.S. National Research Council

>> workshop in October 1996 at which representatives from film, video

>> game, entertainment and theme-parks came together with those from the

>> Department of Defense, academia and the defense industries. There is

>> much about this convergence that we might productively take an

>> interest in. Let me, however, highlight storytelling in particular.

>>

>> In a military context, Ghamari-Tabrizi points out, skilled

>> storytelling techniques are used to help participants in a VR

>> environment sense that they are in a real environment and behave

>> accordingly. Storytelling functions as a potent form of emotional

>> cueing that would seem to elicit the desired responses. But

>> especially interesting, I think, is the fact that “many conference

>> participants argued that the preferred mode of experiential immersion

>> in electronic media is not the unframed chaos of hypertext, but

>> old-fashioned storytelling.” She quotes Alex Seiden of Industrial

>> Light and Magic (note the date — 1996): “I’ve never seen a CD-ROM

>> that moved me the way a powerful film has. I’ve never visited a Web

>> page with great emotional impact. I contend that linear narrative is

>> the fundamental art form of humankind: the novel, the play, the film… these are the forms that define our cultural experience.”

>>

>> Comments?

>>

>> Yours,

>> WM

>> —

>> Willard McCarty (http://www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of

>> Digital Humanities, King’s College London, and Digital Humanities

>> Research Group, University of Western Sydney

Turning Technophobia through Digital Storytelling

http://www.nmc.org/blog/turning-technophobia-through-digital-storytelling/

 

Digital Humanities

Where Can I Fit into the World of Digital Humanities? A Conversation

A CSPW Digital Premodern Workshop, co-sponsored by the James Ford Bell Library
“Where Can I Fit into the World of Digital Humanities? A Conversation”

Facilitated by:

Dr. Austin Mason, historian and Robert A Oden Jr. Postdoctoral Fellow for Innovation in the Liberal Arts and Digital Humanities, Carleton College

and

Dr. Justin Schell, Digital Arts Sciences + Humanities – University of Minnesota Libraries
Saturday, 4 April 2015

9:30 am – 12:30 pm

120 Andersen Library, 222 – 21st Avenue South, West Bank Campus

premod@umn.edu
http://premodern.umn.edu

Jumping into the Digital Humanities with Sarah V. Melton

http://gla.georgialibraries.org/mediawiki/index.php/Carterette_Series_Webinars_Archive

the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. five concepts: web design; digital exhibits; GIS geographical information systems; text mining; text encoding

Digital Literacy

Digital Literacy, Information Literacy and Connectivism

http://bethtransuelib.wordpress.com/2014/08/22/digital-literacy-information-literacy-and-connectivism/

One concern that I have is that because information literacy is so identified with librarians, that digital literacy may be seen as outside the purview of librarians when in fact it is a natural pairing.

Digital Literacy Tutorials
http://www.statelibraryofiowa.org/ld/c-d/digital-info-lit/Tutorials

Examining Digital Literacy Practices on Social Network Sites

http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/RTE/0471-aug2012/RTE0471Examining.pdf

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