Posts Tagged ‘Digital Storytelling’

data storytelling

3 Reasons Why Data Storytelling Will Be A Top Marketing Trend of 2018

https://martechseries.com/mts-insights/guest-authors/3-reasons-data-storytelling-will-top-marketing-trend-2018/
A study that looked at reader engagement across articles that contained charts and infographics vs. articles that were text-only found that those with graphical storytelling, or what I like to call data storytelling, had up to 34 percent more comments and shares and a 300 percent improvement on the depth of scroll down the page.
Using storytelling techniques to present data not only makes it more visually appealing but also enables easy spotting of key trends, seamless results-tracking, and quick goal-monitoring.

Here are things that can help you build a bridge from your current methods to effective data storytelling–

  • Choose a topic by identifying your target audience, the goal of your visual, what you would like to achieve.
  • Organize your data by thinking about what you want to convey and then get rid of anything that doesn’t help you tell that story.
  • Spend time making your visualization look sharp by keeping it simple, using color and interactivity.

A few bonus tips to make your data visualizations really pop–

  • Don’t use more than two graphs at a time so as not to confuse participants.
  • Stick with one color per graph; making things multicolored will cause data to look jumbled.
  • Give context to your concept. Introduce your idea slowly and tell the story of what you want your data to reveal instead of assuming everyone in the room is on the same page.
  • Try using interactive data storytelling techniques to support your data.
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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

digital curation

Digital Curation: Definitions, Tools, and Strategies de David Kelly

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Digital Curation: What kind of curator are you? #converge11 from Joyce Seitzinger

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Engaging higher education tools via digital curation from Australian Digital Futures Institute

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http://digitalcuration.umaine.edu/

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Unger on digital curation
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/06/digital-curation/

more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

more on data literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/09/19/scopus-webinar/

VR Manga and Immersive Storytelling

VR Manga Is The Immersive Storytelling You Didn’t Know You Wanted

Project Hikari: Tales of the Wedding Rings lets you walk into a manga and become part of the story.

Japanese company Square Enix is looking to broaden the VR storytelling conversation by bringing 3 genres together into one incredible VR experience with Project Hikari: Tales of the Wedding Rings,

“We wanted to do something differently with this technology—we wanted to take VR into a different kind of direction,” Sou told VRScout in an interview. “We asked ourselves: how do we make content that is really unique, and something only our company can do?”

The team realized that manga could provide a creative new avenue of immersive story. Their approach was to create a style that blends animation and comic—giving you the ability to move in and out of panels. Sometimes you can see a range of still panels, others you’re engulfed in the animation of one scene.

I worried that the linear narrative of the manga might interfere with the immersion of VR, or that voiceover narration would keep me from discovering aspects of the story myself.

That worry was completely eliminated almost immediately the moment I put the headset on and the experience began. The Square Enix team was very creative with how they used narration along with the animation within the panels to bring the experience to life. I loved this VR take on the manga, and found Tales of the Wedding Rings to be an incredible experience that honored both mediums.

It’s a cross-section of a lot of different mediums because you have VR, manga (comics), and animation

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

storytelling meets fake news

‘School For Good And Evil’ Is A Kids’ Fantasy Series For The Fake News Era

September 18, 20174:45 PM ET 
http://www.npr.org/2017/09/18/550797568/school-for-good-and-evil-is-a-kids-fantasy-series-for-the-fake-news-era

There’s a YouTube channel, an interactive website with t-shirt giveaways and character contests, Instagrams, dramatic book trailers. Universal Pictures bought the rights to the series pretty much as soon as the first book was published.

The power of a lie that feels true and drives people’s behavior is at the heart of the book — a theme that feels very now.

 

Large-scale visualization

The future of collaboration: Large-scale visualization

 http://usblogs.pwc.com/emerging-technology/the-future-of-collaboration-large-scale-visualization/

More data doesn’t automatically lead to better decisions. A shortage of skilled data scientists has hindered progress towards translation of information into actionable business insights. In addition, traditionally dense spreadsheets and linear slideshows are ineffective to present discoveries when dealing with Big Data’s dynamic nature. We need to evolve how we capture, analyze and communicate data.

Large-scale visualization platforms have several advantages over traditional presentation methods. They blur the line between the presenter and audience to increase the level of interactivity and collaboration. They also offer simultaneous views of both macro and micro perspectives, multi-user collaboration and real-time data interaction, and a limitless number of visualization possibilities – critical capabilities for rapidly understanding today’s large data sets.

Visualization walls enable presenters to target people’s preferred learning methods, thus creating a more effective communication tool. The human brain has an amazing ability to quickly glean insights from patterns – and great visualizations make for more efficient storytellers.

Grant: Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries and Learning Spaces
Award amount: $40,000
Funder: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Lead institution: North Carolina State University Libraries
Due date: 13 August 2017
Notification date: 15 September 2017
Website: https://immersivescholar.org
Contact: immersivescholar@ncsu.edu

Project Description

NC State University, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, invites proposals from institutions interested in participating in a new project for Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries and Learning Spaces. The grant aims to 1) build a community of practice of scholars and librarians who work in large-scale multimedia to help visually immersive scholarly work enter the research lifecycle; and 2) overcome technical and resource barriers that limit the number of scholars and libraries who may produce digital scholarship for visualization environments and the impact of generated knowledge. Libraries and museums have made significant strides in pioneering the use of large-scale visualization technologies for research and learning. However, the utilization, scale, and impact of visualization environments and the scholarship created within them have not reached their fullest potential. A logical next step in the provision of technology-rich, visual academic spaces is to develop best practices and collaborative frameworks that can benefit individual institutions by building economies of scale among collaborators.

The project contains four major elements:

  1. An initial meeting and priority setting workshop that brings together librarians, scholars, and technologists working in large-scale, library and museum-based visualization environments.
  2. Scholars-in-residence at NC State over a multi-year period who pursue open source creative projects, working in collaboration with our librarians and faculty, with the potential to address the articulated limitations.
  3. Funding for modest, competitive block grants to other institutions working on similar challenges for creating, disseminating, validating, and preserving digital scholarship created in and for large-scale visual environments.
  4. A culminating symposium that brings together representatives from the scholars-in-residence and block grant recipient institutions to share and assess results, organize ways of preserving and disseminating digital products produced, and build on the methods, templates, and tools developed for future projects.

Work Summary
This call solicits proposals for block grants from library or museum systems that have visualization installations. Block grant recipients can utilize funds for ideas ranging from creating open source scholarly content for visualization environments to developing tools and templates to enhance sharing of visualization work. An advisory panel will select four institutions to receive awards of up to $40,000. Block grant recipients will also participate in the initial priority setting workshop and the culminating symposium. Participating in a block grant proposal does not disqualify an individual from later applying for one of the grant-supported scholar-in-residence appointments.
Applicants will provide a statement of work that describes the contributions that their organization will make toward the goals of the grant. Applicants will also provide a budget and budget justification.
Activities that can be funded through block grants include, but are not limited to:

  • Commissioning work by a visualization expert
  • Hosting a visiting scholar, artist, or technologist residency
  • Software development or adaptation
  • Development of templates and methodologies for sharing and scaling content utilizing open source software
  • Student or staff labor for content or software development or adaptation
  • Curricula and reusable learning objects for digital scholarship and visualization courses
  • Travel (if necessary) to the initial project meeting and culminating workshop
  • User research on universal design for visualization spaces

Funding for operational expenditures, such as equipment, is not allowed for any grant participant.

Application
Send an application to immersivescholar@ncsu.edu by the end of the day on 13 August 2017 that includes the following:

  • Statement of work (no more than 1000 words) of the project idea your organization plans to develop, its relationship to the overall goals of the grant, and the challenges to be addressed.
  • List the names and contact information for each of the participants in the funded project, including a brief description of their current role, background, expertise, interests, and what they can contribute.
  • Project timeline.
  • Budget table with projected expenditures.
  • Budget narrative detailing the proposed expenditures

Selection and Notification Process
An advisory panel made up of scholars, librarians, and technologists with experience and expertise in large-scale visualization and/or visual scholarship will review and rank proposals. The project leaders are especially keen to receive proposals that develop best practices and collaborative frameworks that can benefit individual institutions by building a community of practice and economies of scale among collaborators.

Awardees will be selected based on:

  • the ability of their proposal to successfully address one or both of the identified problems;
  • the creativity of the proposed activities;
  • relevant demonstrated experience partnering with scholars or students on visualization projects;
  • whether the proposal is extensible;
  • feasibility of the work within the proposed time-frame and budget;
  • whether the project work improves or expands access to large-scale visual environments for users; and
  • the participant’s ability to expand content development and sharing among the network of institutions with large-scale visual environments.

Awardees will be required to send a representative to an initial meeting of the project cohort in Fall 2017.

Awardees will be notified by 15 September 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact immersivescholar@ncsu.edu.

–Mike Nutt Director of Visualization Services Digital Library Initiatives, NCSU Libraries
919.513.0651 http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/do/visualization

 

Digital Storytelling for EDAD 652

Community Relations for Administrators EDAD 652

Instructor Kay Worner

A discussion with Kay’s class of school administrators about the use of digital storytelling as a tool for community relations.

discussion based on LIB 490/590
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

  • Introduction (5-10 min)
    Plamen: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
    students: interests and related information
  • Group assignment (5-10 min)
    Effective communication strategies. List 3-5 and discuss the pros and cons (what makes them effective and are there any impediments, limitations)
  • Class discussion on effective communication strategies: based on the group work findings, how do you think digital storytelling may be [can it be] an effective communication tool

What is Storytelling? How does it differ from Digital Storytelling?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_storytelling

Rossiter & Garcia (2010)  consider “digital stories are short vignettes that combine the art of telling stories with multimedia objects including images, audio, and video” (p. 37)

Is Digital Storytelling more then just storytelling on technology steroids?

What is Digital Storytelling (DS) for school leadership? A bibliographic research reveals a plenitude of research on DS in the classroom, for educators, but not much for educational leaders.
Guajardo, Oliver, Rodrigez, Valcez, Cantu, & Guajardo (2011) view digital storytelling for emerging educational leaders as “as a process for data creation, analysis, and synthesis.”

There is information for corporate leaders or community leaders and DS, but not much for ed leaders.

Let’s create our own understanding of digital storytelling for educational leaders.

Basic definitions, concepts and processes.

  • Learn about Web 1.0 versus Web 2.0; the Cloud; transliteracy and multiliteracy

Multimodal Literacy refers to meaning-making that occurs through the reading, viewing, understanding, responding to and producing and interacting with multimedia and digital texts. It may include oral and gestural modes of talking, listening and dramatising as well as writing, designing and producing such texts. The processing of modes, such as image, words, sound and movement within texts can occur simultaneously and is often cohesive and synchronous. Sometimes specific modes may dominate.

http://guides.library.stonybrook.edu/digital-storytelling

  • Social Media and digital storytelling
    which social media tools would you employ to ensure a digital story happening?

When you hear the term, Digital Storytelling, do you immediately consider Social Media?

IT’S A MINDSET – NOT A SKILL
http://turndog.co/2015/06/16/how-to-use-social-media-in-your-digital-storytelling/

Share Your Brand’s (School?) Story
https://www.postplanner.com/digital-storytelling-techniques-secret-sauce-social-media/

  • group work (15-20) min
    split in groups of 3: an ed leader, a media specialist (or teacher with technology background) and a teacher (to represent a school committee on community relations)
    you have 5 min to research (Internet, access to school resources) and 5-10 min to come up with a strategy for use of digital storytelling for expanding and improving community relationship
    Base your strategy on existing examples.
    E.g.:
    Do the following electronic resources regarding this particular educational institution relay digital story:
    http://strideacademy.org/
    https://www.facebook.com/StrideAcademy/
    https://twitter.com/search?q=Stride%20Academy%20Charter%20School&src=tyah
    https://youtu.be/eekIUqMQ4v0
    What do you like?
    What would you do differently?
  • Digital Storytelling for building, expanding, improving community relations – final thoughts

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literature:
Rossiter, M., & Garcia, P. A. (2010). Digital storytelling: A new player on the narrative field.
New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education, 2010(126), 37-48.
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Guajardo, M., Oliver, J. A., Rodriguez, G., Valadez, M. M., Cantu, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal Of Research On Leadership Education, 6(5), 145-161.
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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

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