Posts Tagged ‘edad’

12 passive-aggressive phrases you should never use

John Rampton, Entrepreneur  Mar. 17, 2017, 11:51 AM

http://www.businessinsider.com/12-passive-aggressive-phrases-you-should-never-use-2017-3

Passive-aggressive behavior is frustrating for both parties involved. It’s unproductive and it makes you and others become less trusted in the workplace.

  1. ‘Fine.’

My best friend recently brought this phrase to my attention. As my friend pointed out, whenever someone tells you that everything is “fine,” that always means the opposite. It turns out this is pretty spot-on. Signe Whitson L.S.W. states in Psychology Today that the “passive aggressive person uses phrases like ‘Fine’ in order to express anger indirectly and to shut down direct, emotionally honest communication.”

  1. ‘No worries.’

Actually, you do have worries. Christine Schoenwald elaborates in Thought Catalog that “This translates to ‘I’m saying no worries but what I actually mean is screw you. I won’t say what I’m really feeling but will hold it against you until I explode.'”

  1. ‘If you really want to.’

This may appear to be accommodating at first, but don’t be fooled. Whenever you tell someone, or someone tells you, this phrase, you’re actually being noncommittal. It may sound as if you’re going along with the plan, but inside you’re not all that thrilled — but you just don’t know how to communicate those feelings, or you may thing that the other person will be mad.

  1. ‘Thanks in advance.’

I’m horrible at this one, and it’s something I’m working on each day. It’s another phrase that may appear innocent at first. But it pretty much means that you’re expecting them to do whatever it is you’re asking and they pretty much have to do it. This damages your relationship with this person.

  1. ‘I was surprised/confused/curious about …’

When you hear this or see the text you can be certain it is used to disguise criticism, as opposed to be being upfront. Jennifer Winter recalls on The Muse the time she had a colleague who used phrases like this as “an attempt to soften the blow.” Winter, however, “took it as a stab in the back because my boss was in attendance — and that feeling led me to promptly ignore her feedback.”

  1. ‘I’m not mad.’

This one destroyed my relationship with my ex-wife. I never expressed how I truly felt. I’ve now learned to voice my opinions openly and be honest with my spouse. It’s the same in the workplace. Yes. This person is livid. They’re just not being honest with you. I find that whenever I use this phrase I don’t feel as if I can be honest with the person. Learn to express how you feel.

  1. ‘Whatever.’

I once had a disagreement with a friend that took place over text messaging. When they dropped the ‘whatever’ response I almost went through the roof. It was infuriating because I knew that they did care — they just didn’t want to keep that discussion going. Yes this person is mad, and now you are too. It’s not helping.

  1. ‘So …’

How can a two-letter word pack such a punch? Because most of the time it’s followed by text that either is awkward or shows their agitation. For example, “So … are we going to the movies tonight?” or “So … did you get my email?” The person on the other side is clearly agitated that you haven’t responded yet. And that’s a problem when you honestly haven’t had a chance to get back to the person.

Or, it could be the beginning of an uncomfortable conversation; the person just does not know how to come out and say it. When someone says, “So …” to me, and then that weird pause, I have the almost irresistible desire to say, “So … what?” And make an exit. This can even be expressed in the content marketing you put up on your website.

  1. ‘Just wondering…’

You see this text when someone is asking you for an unreasonable request, like, “Just wondering if you were in the city tomorrow and could pick up my brother for the train station?” Even if you were in the city, the train station could be nowhere close to where you’re at. In other words, this person knows he or she shouldn’t be asking you for this favor but will ask anyway. Keep in mind that some shy people may use this question when asking if you want to go somewhere or do something with them. Like, “I was just wondering if you would like to go to the movies with me?”

  1. ‘I was only joking.’

Sarcasm is on the most common manifestations of passive aggressiveness. If this person makes a comment that upsets you and this is what follows, then you know it wasn’t a joke at all. The person meant what was said but is backing away to cover up his or her true feelings. This is an especially damaging phrase when used in a relationship or (often) in front of other people, as a put-down.

  1. ‘Hope it’s worth it.’

This phrase should be rather obvious. The person you’re communicating with clearly doesn’t want you to do something but is aware that you will do so anyway. Instead of expressing concern, the person will leave with this passive-aggressive text and stew until it become a major issue. This person will also beg you to discuss it later so he or she can use the phrase again on you. It’s a shaming phrase.

  1. ‘Your thoughts?’

In most cases I find this a pretty harmless phrase. Asking for someone’s thoughts on dinner, etc. But this phrase can also be used a way to tell someone that he or she screwed up. “Your behavior has been subpar at work, your thoughts?” or “I wasn’t that happy with how this assignment turned out, your thoughts?” Both of these are passive-aggressive and damage your relationship with the person.

Your thoughts … on this article? What other phrases do you find yourself or others using that are passive-aggressive? I’m not mad, just tell me.

Read the original article on Entrepreneur. Copyright 2017.

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more on passive aggressive behavior in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=passive+aggressive

digital learning faculty support

Report: Faculty Support Lacking for Wide Adoption of Digital Learning

By Dian Schaffhauser 06/19/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/06/19/faculty-support-lacking-for-wide-adoption-of-digital-learning.aspx

new report produced by Tyton Partners in collaboration with the Babson Survey Research Group. two fall 2016 surveys of a national sample of 3,500 postsecondary respondents.

extent of digital learning implementation in support of strategic priorities

These gaps and others “suggest a disconnect, the report stated, “between the impacts that many administrators perceive and the reality of how digital learning is changing the market.” Open-ended responses suggested that expectations for the impact of digital learning were “set too high” or weren’t being “measured or communicated well.” Another common refrain: There’s inadequate institutional support.

While most administrators told researchers that “faculty are crucial to the success of digital learning initiatives — serving as both a bolster and a barrier to implementation success,” the resources for supporting faculty to implement digital learning are insufficient. Just a quarter of respondents said faculty professional development was implemented “effectively and at scale.” Thirty-five percent said implementation was in progress. And a third (33 percent) reported that faculty professional development was “incomplete, inconsistent, informal and/or optional.”

The report offered recommendations for improving and expanding digital learning adoption. Among the guidance:

  • Get realistic. While the data suggested that digital learning could improve scheduling flexibility and access, among other benefits, schools need to identify which goals are most important and “clearly articulate how and to what extent its digital learning programs are expected to help.”
  • Measure impact and broadcast it. Forget about small pilots; go for a scale that will demonstrate impact and then share the findings internally and with other institutions.
  • Use buying power to influence the market. Connect faculty with vendors for “education, product discovery and feedback.” Insist on accessibility within products, strong integration features and user friendliness.
  • Prepare faculty for success. Make sure there are sufficient resources and incentives to help faculty “buy into the strategy” and follow through on implementation.

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more on digital learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+learning

writing first draft

Writing the First Draft: The No-Nonsense Guide for Authors

  • I go to a quiet room, office, library or coffee shop.
  • Depending on where I am, I brew/order a cup of coffee.
  • I disconnect my computer from the internet.
  • I put my phone in airplane mode.
  • I open up Scrivener.
  • I arrange the outline for the chapter in question.
  • I set a timer for 30 minutes.
  • I write, keep my fingers moving and avoid stopping to edit myself (this is harder than it sounds).
  • When the buzzer sounds, I stand up and take a two-minute break.
  • After this break, I review my outline and notes.

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25 Things About Writing

by Justin McLachlan  http://www.justinmclachlan.com/1670/25-things-writing/

also in: http://pin.it/HwXSc4n

  • Real writing is actually a lot of rewriting.
  • Your friends won’t be as impressed the second time around. Don’t let it stop you.
  • Grammar, punctuation, spelling — it’s okay if all these things come last.
  • First drafts universally suck.
  • Avoid the advice of those who tell you otherwise of #5.
  • Trying to edit while writing is like trying to chop down a tree while you’re climbing it
  • Writing can be lonely. Very, very lonely.
  • Inspiration will never strike when you need it to. Just write. Do the work.
  • Complex construction doesn’t equal complex though. Simplify.
  • Deadlines. Goals. Set them, and stick to them.

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more on proofreading in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proofreading
more proofreading techniques for the EDAD doctoral cohort on Pinterest
https://www.pinterest.com/aidedza/doctoral-cohort/

mindfulness storytelling heal

How Mindfulness and Storytelling Help Kids Heal and Learn

Sept 2016 https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/09/26/how-mindfulness-and-storytelling-help-kids-heal-and-learn/

Neurological research shows that tragic experiences can affect brain development and impact a child’s ability to concentrate and relax.

In an attempt to offer more psychological support, they reached out to Grossman who is a teacher and co-founder of Mindful Schools. The definition of mindfulness, says Grossman, is to “pay attention, on purpose, to the present moment.”

a form of narrative therapy for the students.

“Mindfulness taught our kids that they have the ability to make wise choices, and it’s strengthened their resiliency.”

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more on mindfulness in this IMS blog:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindfulness

more on storytelling in this blog:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=storytelling

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