Posts Tagged ‘education and employment’

social brand

What’s Your Social Brand?

By Aneesa Davenport     Apr 3, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-04-03-what-s-your-social-brand

What is social branding?

Social branding is the way you present yourself online. All of us have a digital footprint and a digital shadow—being cognizant of what these are helps you curate what kind of persona your potential employer sees when they Google you, look you up on LinkedIn, or find you on Twitter. Social branding is when you make a decision about what you want these results to be and what parts of your experience you want to highlight.

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more on social branding in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=branding

SCSU Career Center Handshake

The SCSU Career Center has partnered with Handshake

https://stcloudstate.joinhandshake.com

(replacing Jobs for Huskies) – a modern career network for students which provides one place for launching careers, obtaining interviews, attending events, and much more!  Employers will have one place to post jobs, internships, co-ops, interview opportunities and info sessions. We officially went live on June 18th and are thrilled with how easy it is to use!

Why the switch? As of January 2018, Handshake became the leading early talent network with over 500 schools and 250,000 employers participating, which means more opportunities for our students and alumni!

For more info: please contact the Career Center, 320-308-2151, careercenter@stcloudstate.edu,http://www.stcloudstate.edu/careercenter

income-share agreements (ISAs)

income-share agreements (ISAs)

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/news/a-new-way-to-get-people-into-coding-1765499/

A new way to get people into coding

Want to learn to code without paying up front? Programs such as Lambda School, App Academy and even Purdue University are experimenting with income-share agreements (ISAs), in which students agree to pay a portion of their income after graduation, reports The Atlantic. It’s a promising idea, particularly when businesses needs to fill over half a million computer-science jobs. But the schemes are still in their infancy, and it remains to be seen whether ISAs prove to be a viable business model or successful for graduates.

https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2018/06/an-alternative-to-student-loan-debt/563093/

Code Now. Pay Tuition Later.

critical thinking and graduates

Do critical thinking skills give graduates the edge?

It has long been claimed that critical thinking ability sets graduates apart. But are universities really preparing students for the modern workplace? David Matthews reports

August 3, 2017  By David Matthews

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/features/do-critical-thinking-skills-give-graduates-the-edge

what value is higher education supposed to add? And how is this different from what school or vocational education offer?

A further question is whether even the academic brand of critical thinking is being particularly well taught at university. According to Bryan Greetham, a philosopher and university researcher who has written several books on how students and professionals can improve their thinking, “We tend to want to do the simple thing – which is to teach students what to think, not how to think.”

This was most famously explored in the 2011 book Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses. The authors, American sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, found that 45 per cent of US undergraduates failed to significantly improve their critical thinking, complex reasoning and writing skills during their first two years at university. Other US-based studies have raised similar concerns. One from 2009, “Improving Students’ Evaluation of Informal Arguments”, published in the Journal of Experimental Education, warned that college and high school students have “difficulty evaluating arguments on the basis of their quality”.

But if universities don’t have the resources to offer intensive classes, could they weave the teaching of critical thinking skills into regular teaching? Britt thinks that academics can easily make time for quick “check-ins” during their lectures to ensure that their students understand what they’ve been told.

High school experience, of course, varies enormously by country. In France, studying philosophy – arguably the closest that traditional disciplines get to explicit critical thinking courses – is compulsory. In England, meanwhile, the critical thinking A level has recently been scrapped.

As well as calls for critical thinkers and smart thinkers, there are also frequent demands from politicians for more “entrepreneurial” university graduates – who, instead of joining graduate recruitment programmes at large employers, might start their own businesses.

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critical thinking
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=critical+thinking

skepticism reg PSE

Losing the White Working Class, Too

Survey of voting bloc that favored Trump finds skepticism about value of higher education.

Scott Jaschik July 31, 2017

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/07/31/new-data-point-white-working-class-skepticism-value-college

professors and college leaders were stunned and concerned by recent data showing that more than half of Republicans say that colleges have a negative impact on the U.S., with wealthier, older and more educated Republicans being least positive.

Study after study has found that a college credential is essential for economic advancement, and these studies include associate-degree programs that focus on job-related training.

Among white working-class voters who voted for Barack Obama and then voted for Trump, only 21 percent saw debt-free public college as a major issue. That was behind six other possible issues, with building up infrastructure in ways that would create jobs attracting the most support, from 43 percent of these voters.

Among black working-class voters, however, 39 percent identified debt-free public college as a top issue, and that was the second rated of the seven possibilities. (Raising the minimum wage won top billing.)

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more on employment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=employment

workforce skills

These are the top 10 workforce skills students will need by 2020

By Laura Ascione, Managing Editor, Content Services, @eSN_Laura
June 20th, 2017
a recent McGraw-Hill Education survey, just 40 percent of college seniors said they felt their college experience was helpful in preparing for a career. Alarmingly, that percentage plummeted to 19 percent for women answering the same question.
data from the nonprofit Institute for the Future, there are 6 drivers of change in today’s workforce:
1. Extreme longevity: People are living longer–by 2025 the number of Americans older than 60 will increase by 70 percent
2. The rise of smart machines and systems: Technology can augment and extend our own capabilities, and workplace automation is killing repetitive jobs
3. Computational world: Increases in sensors and processing makes the world a programmable system; data will give us the ability to see things on a scale that has never been possible
4. New media ecology: New communication tools require media literacies beyond text; visual communication media is becoming a new vernacular
5. Superstructured organizations: Social technologies drive new forms of production and value creation, and social tools are allowing organizations to work at extreme scales
6. Globally connected world: Diversity and adaptability are at the center of operations–the U.S. and Europe no longer hold a monopoly on job creation, innovation, and political power

The top 10 workforce skills of 2020 include:

1. Sense making: The ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems

2. Social intelligence: The ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

3. Novel and adaptive thinking: Proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

4. Cross cultural competency: The ability to operate in different cultural settings. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

5. Computational thinking: The ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data based reasoning. The Drivers: New media ecology, computational world

6. New media literacy: The ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, new media ecology, Superstructured organizations

7. Transdisciplinary: Literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, computational world

8. Design mindset: The ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world

9. Cognitive load management: The ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functions. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world, new media ecology

10. Virtual collaboration: The ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

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more on skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=skills

Higher Ed Falls Short

Report: Americans Value College Degrees But Say Higher Ed Falls Short on Delivering Promises

By Sri Ravipati  05/12/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/12/americans-value-college-degrees-but-say-higher-ed-falls-short-on-delivering-promises.aspx

new survey, “Varying Degrees: New America’s Annual Survey on Higher Education,” which involved more than 1,600 individuals in the United States who are ages 18 and older.

explore the data using an interactive tool

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data reveal key differences across categories of age, gender, generation, region, socioeconomic status, race and political ideology

 

  • Most respondents want to see changes made in higher ed, with just 25 percent answering the system is “just fine the way it is” and helps students succeed;
  • Students want additional help crossing the finish line, with 57 percent of respondents answering that higher ed institutions should help students succeed;
  • Just one in three respondents answered that the federal government is having a positive impact on higher ed;
  • Two-year colleges and four-year public universities are seen as especially worth the cost compared to other institution types, with 83 percent and 79 percent of respondents respectively saying these institution types “contribute to a strong American workforce”

“Although people believe in higher education generally, they are not satisfied with specific institutions and policies that we have in place right now — they are broadly dissatisfied,”

 

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more on education and employment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=education+employment