Posts Tagged ‘Encryption’

smartphones for learning and policies

6 ways to use students’ smartphones for learning

By Kelsey Ehnle 12/26/2018 BYOD Mobile learning Tools

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=528
Smartphones also provide an easy way for teachers to “inspire students to positively contribute to and responsibly participate in the digital world,” as espoused by the ISTE Standards for Educators.
research shows that when students are engaged in their learning — and they’re almost always engaged with their phones when given a choice — they are less likely to succumb to distractions.

1. Create short videos.

Videos can express any type of learning in any style, from music videos to interviews, book trailers, historical re-enactments, tutorials and stop animations.

Flipgrid is the one of the best educational video-creation sites

2. Access an online dictionary and thesaurus.

Find synonyms in many languages at Open Thesaurus!
Linguee
.

PONS or LEO. Question about a verb conjugation? Go to LEO or Canoo (for German)

3. Collaborate and share with Padlet and Twitter.

4. Scan QR codes.

5. Listen to podcasts and read the news.

6. Compete against classmates!

Quizlet and Kahoot, Gimkit

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=kahoot

6. Use the apps, obviously.

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Gartner predicts that nearly 38 percent of companies will stop providing devices to workers by 2017 — but 20 percent of those BYOD programs will fail because of overly restrictive mobile device management measures. So how can IT pros devise a BYOD strategy that stays afloat? Here are six guidelines to accommodate legitimate IT concerns without sinking a policy’s odds of success:

Look to Existing Policies

Before creating a BYOD policy, take a look at existing HR and legal procedures. Many email, VPN, and remote access security policies can be applied to mobile devices, as well.

Provide Training and Education

Employees are using personal devices at work, whether the company realizes it or not. But that doesn’t mean they are using them correctly. Employees often use  file-sharing and other tools of their choosing without IT’s knowledge, which could put sensitive corporate data at risk. Use a BYOD policy to trainemployees how to correctly use their applications

Specify Devices

BYOD isn’t limited to smartphones. According to Gartner, a “new norm” is emerging in which employees manage up to four or five devices at work.

Enforce Passwords and Encryption

passwords aren’t foolprool. Data encryption is an additional security measure

A smart BYOD policy doesn’t mean IT is off the hook. Rather, successful policies rely on IT and employees sharing security obligations.

Set Ownership Expectations

Employees often fail to realize that all data on their devices is discoverable, regardless of whether the device is personal or company-owned. The question of who owns what is still a legal gray area, though companies increasingly take the liberty to remote wipe employees’ personal devices once they leave their job. Avoid the guessing game with a clear exit strategy.

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more on BYOD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=byod
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

The monopoly of the tech giants

Here’s the real danger that Facebook, Google, and the other tech monopolies pose to our society

Jamie Bartlett, October 1, 2018, https://blog.ed.ted.com/2018/10/01/heres-the-real-danger-that-facebook-google-and-the-other-tech-monopolies-pose-to-our-society/

distributed computing + power encryption = the future of Internet

the Dark Net is going mainstream, liberty, freedom, democracy; neither entirely dark, not entirely light, both things

The threat that tech monopolies pose to democracies is about more than the prices they charge: it’s the concentration of power, data and control over the public space — and their ability to wield this power over a growing number of economic activities, especially in the infrastructure and technologies of the future. The following companies operate as either monopolies or oligopolies in their respective fields: Google, Facebook, Uber, Airbnb, Amazon, Twitter, Instagram, Spotify. Integrated into everything, everywhere, their technology will blanket the world.

cultural hegemony.” That is, where domination can be achieved through controlling the ideas and assumptions available to the public. The idea, associated with philosopher and politician Antonio Gramsci

In 1995, left-wing academics Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron detailed the philosophy and ideas of the new tech wunderkinds, christening it “The Californian Ideology.” This ideology represented a fusion of the cultural bohemianism of San Francisco and entrepreneurial free market zeal.

All you needed to get to utopia was a belief in “disruption,” the idea that progress is achieved through smashing up old industries and institutions and replacing them with something new and digital.

Money and ideas in Silicon Valley have a very complicated relationship. Silicon Valley runs according to a Faustian pact: money in exchange for world-changing ideas.

Over the years, the big tech firms have very carefully cultivated the Californian Ideology. Even though they are massive multi-billion-dollar corporations with huge PR teams, they pitch themselves as anti-establishment.The worse these companies behave and the richer they become, the more they spend on looking cool and talking about fairness and community.

And to whom do we look in order to solve our collective social problems? It’s no longer the state, but the modern tech-geek superhero.

Total victory for the monopoly is not over economics or politics. It’s over assumptions, ideas and possible futures.

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more on social media in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

Google AI

Google Researchers Create AI That Builds Its Own Encryption

BY TOM BRANT OCTOBER 28, 2016 04:45PM EST

http://www.pcmag.com/news/349154/google-researchers-create-ai-that-builds-its-own-encryption

Alice and Bob have figured out a way to have a conversation without Eve being able to overhear, no matter how hard she tries.

They’re artificial intelligence algorithms created by Google engineers, and their ability to create an encryption protocol that Eve (also an AI algorithm) can’t hack is being hailed as an important advance in machine learning and cryptography.

Martin Abadi and David G. Andersen, explained in a paper published this week that their experiment is intended to find out if neural networks—the building blocks of AI—can learn to communicate secretly.

As the Abadi and Anderson wrote, “instead of training each of Alice and Bob separately to implement some known cryptosystem, we train Alice and Bob jointly to communicate successfully and to defeat Eve without a pre-specified notion of what cryptosystem they may discover for this purpose.”

same in German

Googles AI entwickelt eigenständig Verschlüsselung

von – 31.10.2016
http://www.com-magazin.de/news/verschluesselung/googles-ai-entwickelt-eigenstaendig-verschluesselung-1145175.html
Google-Forscher Martin Abadi und David G. Andersen des Deep-Learning-Projekts “Google Brain” eine neue Verschlüsselungsmethode entwickelt beziehungsweise entwickeln lassen. Die Forscher haben verschiedene neurale Netze damit beauftragt, eine abhörsichere Kommunikation aufzustellen.

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more on AI in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=artificial+intelligence

Quantum Internet

Physics: Unite to build a quantum Internet

Stefano Pirandola & Samuel L. Braunstein

http://www.nature.com/news/physics-unite-to-build-a-quantum-internet-1.19716

Quantum network: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_network

China’s new quantum satellite will try to teleport data outside the bounds of space and time

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/what-is-a-quantum-satellite/article9012342.ece

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/chinese-satellite-is-1-giant-step-for-the-quantum-internet/

password manager

How and why to set up and use a password manager

Commit to a password manager to make your online life easier and more secure.

http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-and-why-to-set-up-and-use-a-password-manager/

A password manager stores the passwords for your various online accounts and profiles and saves you from having to remember and enter each one each time you visit a password-protected site. Instead, your passwords are encrypted and held by your password manager, which you then protect with a master password. Since you are saved from having to remember all of your passwords, you will be less tempted by the dangerously poor idea of using the same password for all of your accounts. With a password manager, you can create strong passwords for all of your accounts and keep all of those passwords saved behind a stronger master password, leaving you to remember but a single password.

With PasswordBox, you can sign up for an account via its mobile app or the PasswordBox website on a computer. I chose the latter and downloaded PasswordBox from its website, which turned out to be a browser extension.