Stop Using LinkedIn like Facebook

Ten signs you’re using LinkedIn like Facebook (and how to stop)

1. A profile picture that won’t get you hired.

Do yourself a favour and click the “People you may know” button and pick something you like that has a little more respectability to it. The same applies for avatars and pictures with someone else other than you in them.

2. A professional headline that is anything but.

Use a description that is both accurate and related to either the benefit you provide or your title within your company. Either way, this is guaranteed to return your profile in some searches.

3. Shameless friend collecting.

It’s a bad first impression. Give people a reason to connect with you and start off on the right foot.

4. Not even really wanting to be friends.

What do you do with all those connections? Do you actively keep in touch? What do you do when you get a message from a contact about business? Do you tut, sigh and ignore them? Fly into a rant about people contacting you on LinkedIn to talk business opportunities?

5. Going all “selly sell” right off the bat.

Do you send spam messages? The LinkedIn inbox delivers into your recipient’s inbox. It might be a warmer and softer way to get noticed but there is no relationship. Better to create rapport by asking questions, sharing content, joining the same group and showing your expertise and counselling side there.

6. Joining groups and not getting involved.

If you join groups and then don’t contribute, you’re partially responsible for the failure of the group. Quickest remedy is to set your group digest emails to once weekly and comment on a few discussions once a week when your email lands.

7. Liking and commenting on absolutely everything.

Liking and commenting on everything works well on Facebook and gives your friends a vanity boost but on LinkedIn less so. Think of it as being at that networking event and you’re the loud self absorbed guy no-one wants to talk to. Not quite so appealing?

8. Sending tweets directly into LinkedIn.

The automatic #in from Twitter was removed several years ago but it doesn’t stop the socially savvy copying and pasting or using a third party like Hootsuite to update multiple platforms at the same time. I do this but do try to tailor the messages to not include @ and #. Are your tweets even relevant to your LinkedIn audience? You’ll see they might jar after a while.

9. Asking people you barely know for endorsements and testimonials.

It’s a bit like asking your Facebook page to be liked but actually more vulgar because they haven’t presumably sampled your expertise yet.

10. Insharing Richard Branson’s (and other influencer) updates.

OK, it’s not Richard’s fault, but my point is, I often get to see what Richard and many others have to see a hundred times in my feed thanks to this piece of functionality. It’s got to Facebook like proportions.

When hundreds of people do the obvious, have the bottle to stay true to yourself and go your own way.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/ten-signs-youre-using-linkedin-like-facebook-how-stop-ren%C3%A9-power?trk=prof-post

wearables by Microsoft Facebook and Google

The competition narrows down between Microsoft HoloLens, Facebook Oculus and Google Glass. Each of them bets on different possibilities, which wearable bring.

Facebook Oculus

https://www.oculus.com/


Also available as podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/apm-marketplace-tech/id73330855

http://techcrunch.com/2014/09/20/oculus-platform/

Microsoft HoloLens

http://www.microsoft.com/microsoft-hololens/en-us

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/01/25/microsofts-hololens/

Google Glass

http://www.google.com/glass/start/

Pls consider our related IMS blog entries:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=wearable

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=google+glass

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=oculus

This Week in Social Media: Vine Introduces New Camera. Twitter add features,

This Week in Social Media:

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/new-vine-camera-week-social-media/

Vine becomes more complex/potent and gets in closer competition with YouTube, Twitter gets in a closer closer competition with Facebook, YouTube becomes more complex, Facebook is further pushing adds in our lives, LinkedIn gets closer with SlideShare

Vine Introduces New Camera: “The new camera offers powerful ways to edit your videos, as well as the ability to import existing videos on your phone and turn them into Vines.”

Twitter Updates Timeline Feed: “Additionally, when we identify a tweet, an account to follow or other content that’s popular or relevant, we may add it to your timeline. This means you will sometimes see tweets from accounts you don’t follow.”

YouTube Updates App: “This YouTube app on TV will make it easier to find what you want through the Guide, and it brings you all the playlists, shelves and branding from channels.”

Facebook Updates Ad Policy: The change increases “the number of times people can see ads from a page in their news feed per day.”

LinkedIn Announces Rollout of Premium Features to All SlideShare Users: “Now, all users will have access to our most popular premium features that include detailed analytics, profile customization and additional upload options, like video and private uploads.”

Social Media: Orkut – the end of an era…

Some [many] of you might have received the email on the bottom of this IMS blog

Orkut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orkut), created by a Turkish computer specialist was a strong contestant of Facebook and MySpace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myspace) in the early days when Mark Zuckerberg was only a college kid. While LinkedIn was brought to oblivion by Facebook and reinvented itself as a site for selfstarters/artist, Orkut became the “Facebook” for Brazil and India.
Purchased by Google in 2008, it was doomed when Google+ came to existence.

Pulling the plug on Orkut signifies closes the first chapter on the history of social media

From: orkut <3504732672376623859@mail.orkut.com>
Date: July 5, 2014 at 2:30:29 AM CDT
Subject: A Farewell to Orkut
Reply-To: orkut <noreply-orkut@google.com>

A Farewell to Orkut

After ten years of sparking conversations and forging connections, we have decided it’s time for us to start saying goodbye to Orkut. Over the past decade, YouTube, Blogger and Google+ have taken off, with communities springing up in every corner of the world. Because the growth of these communities has outpaced Orkut’s growth, we’ve decided to focus our energy and resources on making these other social platforms as amazing as possible for everyone who uses them.

We will shut down Orkut on September 30, 2014. Until then, there will be no impact on you, so you may have time to manage the transition. You can export your profile data, community posts and photos using Google Takeout (available until September 2016). We are preserving an archive of all public communities, which will be available online starting September 30, 2014. If you don’t want your posts or name to be included in the community archive, you can remove Orkut permanently from your Google account. Please visit our Help Center for any further details.

It’s been a great 10 years, and we apologize to those of you still actively using the service. We hope you will find other online communities to spark more conversations and build even more connections for the next decade and beyond.

Facebook’s referral traffic share grew over 37% in Q1 2014, Pinterest was up 48%, Twitter increased only 1%

Facebook’s referral traffic share grew over 37% in Q1 2014, Pinterest was up 48%, Twitter increased only 1%

http://thenextweb.com/facebook/2014/04/21/facebooks-referral-traffic-share-grew-37-q1-2014-pinterest-48-twitter-increased-1/

Shareaholic SOcial Media Traffic Referrals

Once again, the real winner here is Facebook, Pinterest may be able to challenge it soon though, as it is now driving just over a third of the traffic Facebook is.

http://www.edudemic.com/social-media-in-education/

How Social Media Is Being Used In Education

good graph on the bottom of the article (http://www.edudemic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/social-media-for-teaching.jpg)

  • The level of personal use of social media among faculty (70.3 percent) mirrors that of the general population
  • 55 percent of faculty use social media in a professional context (any aspect of their profession outside of teaching), up from 44.7 percent last year
  • Only 41 percent of faculty use social media in the classroom, but this use continues to experience steady year-to-year growth
  • Faculty are sophisticated consumers of social media. They match different sites to their varying personal, professional, and teaching needs
  • Concerns remain about privacy, maintaining the class as a private space for free and open discussion, and the integrity of student submissions
  • Most faculty agree that “the interactive nature of online and mobile technologies create better learning environments” and that digital communication has increased communication with students
  • Faculty believe that online and mobile technologies can be distracting, and that they have resulted in longer working hours and more stress

Pro Domo Sua: Are We Puppets in a Wired World? Surveillance and privacy revisited…

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/nov/07/are-we-puppets-wired-world/

Are We Puppets in a Wired World?

But while we were having fun, we happily and willingly helped to create the greatest surveillance system ever imagined, a web whose strings give governments and businesses countless threads to pull, which makes us…puppets. The free flow of information over the Internet (except in places where that flow is blocked), which serves us well, may serve others better. Whether this distinction turns out to matter may be the one piece of information the Internet cannot deliver.