Posts Tagged ‘Flipped Classroom’

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning Survey

The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative has just launched its 2018 Key Issues in Teaching and Learning Survey, so vote today: http://www.tinyurl.com/ki2018.

Each year, the ELI surveys the teaching and learning community in order to discover the key issues and themes in teaching and learning. These top issues provide the thematic foundation or basis for all of our conversations, courses, and publications for the coming year. Longitudinally they also provide the way to track the evolving discourse in the teaching and learning space. More information about this annual survey can be found at https://www.educause.edu/eli/initiatives/key-issues-in-teaching-and-learning.

ACADEMIC TRANSFORMATION (Holistic models supporting student success, leadership competencies for academic transformation, partnerships and collaborations across campus, IT transformation, academic transformation that is broad, strategic, and institutional in scope)

ACCESSIBILITY AND UNIVERSAL DESIGN FOR LEARNING (Supporting and educating the academic community in effective practice; intersections with instructional delivery modes; compliance issues)

ADAPTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING (Digital courseware; adaptive technology; implications for course design and the instructor’s role; adaptive approaches that are not technology-based; integration with LMS; use of data to improve learner outcomes)

COMPETENCY-BASED EDUCATION AND NEW METHODS FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING (Developing collaborative cultures of assessment that bring together faculty, instructional designers, accreditation coordinators, and technical support personnel, real world experience credit)

DIGITAL AND INFORMATION LITERACIES (Student and faculty literacies; research skills; data discovery, management, and analysis skills; information visualization skills; partnerships for literacy programs; evaluation of student digital competencies; information evaluation)

EVALUATING TECHNOLOGY-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL INNOVATIONS (Tools and methods to gather data; data analysis techniques; qualitative vs. quantitative data; evaluation project design; using findings to change curricular practice; scholarship of teaching and learning; articulating results to stakeholders; just-in-time evaluation of innovations). here is my bibliographical overview on Big Data (scroll down to “Research literature”http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/07/irdl-proposal/ )

EVOLUTION OF THE TEACHING AND LEARNING SUPPORT PROFESSION (Professional skills for T&L support; increasing emphasis on instructional design; delineating the skills, knowledge, business acumen, and political savvy for success; role of inter-institutional communities of practices and consortia; career-oriented professional development planning)

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT (Incentivizing faculty innovation; new roles for faculty and those who support them; evidence of impact on student learning/engagement of faculty development programs; faculty development intersections with learning analytics; engagement with student success)

GAMIFICATION OF LEARNING (Gamification designs for course activities; adaptive approaches to gamification; alternate reality games; simulations; technological implementation options for faculty)

INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN (Skills and competencies for designers; integration of technology into the profession; role of data in design; evolution of the design profession (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/04/instructional-design-3/); effective leadership and collaboration with faculty)

INTEGRATED PLANNING AND ADVISING FOR STUDENT SUCCESS (Change management and campus leadership; collaboration across units; integration of technology systems and data; dashboard design; data visualization (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+visualization); counseling and coaching advising transformation; student success analytics)

LEARNING ANALYTICS (Leveraging open data standards; privacy and ethics; both faculty and student facing reports; implementing; learning analytics to transform other services; course design implications)

LEARNING SPACE DESIGNS (Makerspaces; funding; faculty development; learning designs across disciplines; supporting integrated campus planning; ROI; accessibility/UDL; rating of classroom designs)

MICRO-CREDENTIALING AND DIGITAL BADGING (Design of badging hierarchies; stackable credentials; certificates; role of open standards; ways to publish digital badges; approaches to meta-data; implications for the transcript; Personalized learning transcripts and blockchain technology (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

MOBILE LEARNING (Curricular use of mobile devices (here previous blog postings on this issue:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/25/mc218-remodel/; innovative curricular apps; approaches to use in the classroom; technology integration into learning spaces; BYOD issues and opportunities)

MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TECHNOLOGIES (Virtual, augmented, mixed, and immersive reality; video walls; integration with learning spaces; scalability, affordability, and accessibility; use of mobile devices; multi-dimensional printing and artifact creation)

NEXT-GENERATION DIGITAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS AND LMS SERVICES (Open standards; learning environments architectures (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/digital-learning/; social learning environments; customization and personalization; OER integration; intersections with learning modalities such as adaptive, online, etc.; LMS evaluation, integration and support)

ONLINE AND BLENDED TEACHING AND LEARNING (Flipped course models; leveraging MOOCs in online learning; course development models; intersections with analytics; humanization of online courses; student engagement)

OPEN EDUCATION (Resources, textbooks, content; quality and editorial issues; faculty development; intersections with student success/access; analytics; licensing; affordability; business models; accessibility and sustainability)

PRIVACY AND SECURITY (Formulation of policies on privacy and data protection; increased sharing of data via open standards for internal and external purposes; increased use of cloud-based and third party options; education of faculty, students, and administrators)

WORKING WITH EMERGING LEARNING TECHNOLOGY (Scalability and diffusion; effective piloting practices; investments; faculty development; funding; evaluation methods and rubrics; interoperability; data-driven decision-making)

+++++++++++
learning and teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=teaching+and+learning

flipped classroom without technology

The Technology-Free Approach to Flipping the Classroom

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 | 1:00 PM Central | 60 Minutes

https://www.magnapubs.com/online-seminars/the-technology-free-approach-to-flipping-the-classroom-14539-1.html

Active learning techniques have been shown to improve the classroom experience, leading to higher student success rates and greater student engagement.

As an increasing number of higher education faculty apply the flipped classroom model to their courses, they’re discovering that although the idea of a flip is straightforward, the model is easy to get wrong.

BENEFITS

The flipped model puts greater responsibility for learning on the students while providing them with more room to experiment in the classroom. This leads to a shift in priorities, allowing classroom time to move from merely covering material to working toward mastery of it.

As a result of this presentation, you gain a new perspective on what it means to flip the classroom, leading to revitalized teaching. This seminar not only explores concrete strategies for engaging students in the flipped classroom, but it also delves into why technology-free approaches are important. You will better understand how to do the following:

  • Organize student-led activities to encourage greater communication in the classroom
  • Create a dynamic session devoted to learning through hands-on work
  • Integrate unplugged methods of student engagement into flipped and active classroom learning environments
  • Lean on tools such as sticky notes, flip charts, whiteboards, and dice to inspire new ways of thinking

LEARNING GOALS

The flipped classroom model challenges instructors to create learning experiences in which students have the freedom to apply, analyze, and evaluate course content during class time.

The question is: How do you continue finding innovative teaching strategies and tools to engage students in this way?

Although some creativity is required to plan a flip, the process doesn’t have to be intimidating. This seminar demonstrates a number of simple strategies that motivate students to interact with the material and engage with one another. You will learn the following:

  • Discover a range of “unplugged” teaching strategies used to engage students
  • Learn to identify opportunities for unplugging devices and creating a tech-free learning experience in the classroom
  • Master simple ways to integrate unplugged flipped methods into your course
  • Understand the benefits to including unplugged teaching and learning strategies in flipped course design

TOPICS COVERED

  • Developing new strategies and ideas for the flipped classroom
  • Increasing student engagement with unplugged methods
  • Integrating unplugged methods into flipped and active learning classrooms
  • Using everyday tools to inspire higher-level thinking
  • Expanding the definition of the flipped classroom

AUDIENCE

This seminar is intended for faculty and instructors interested in a role change in the classroom. The flipped learning environment requires teachers to give up their front-of-class position in favor of a more collaborative and cooperative contribution to the teaching process. Are you ready to make a change?

Presenter: https://www.magnapubs.com/bios/barbi-honeycutt-850.html

++++++++++++++++++
more on flipped classroom in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=flipped

online learning lingo

Proportion of Content

Delivered Online

Type of Course

Typical Description

0%

Traditional

Classroom-based teaching with assignments and activities which students pursue independently of each other.

1 to 29%

Web Facilitated

Web resources and technologies are used to facilitate what is essentially a face-to-face course. May use webpages and course management systems (CMS) to post syllabuses, readings and assignments.

30-79%

Blended / Hybrid

Course blends online and face-to-face delivery. Substantial parts of the content are delivered online and discussions, team projects and activities and web safaris are used for learning. The number of face-to-face sessions is decreased as the volume of online activity increases.

80+%

Online

A course where all, or almost all, of the content is delivered online with no or a very small number of face-to-face meetings.
  • Synchronous learning
  • Asynchronous learning

Flipped Classroom

Competency-Based Learning

open learning
Flexible learning (badges)

Gamification

Immersive Learning Environments

Adaptive Learning and Assessment

Systems
Simulation
Immersive Tutoring

++++++++++++++++++

Glossary of Online Learning Terms http://theelearningcoach.com/resources/online-learning-glossary-of-terms/

E-Learning Terms
http://www.bpcc.edu/educationaltechnology/glossary.html

flipped classroom resources

More on flipped classroom in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=flipped&submit=Search

what is it?

  • The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed.
EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative 7 Things You Should Know About Flipped Classrooms – eli7081.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eli7081.pdf
  • Flipped classroom is an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional educational arrangement by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom.

Flipped classroom. (2016, March 22). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Flipped_classroom&oldid=711368580

  • In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates.
Flipping the Classroom | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/flipping-the-classroom/

flipped classroom

 

flipped classroom

flipped classroom

The Flipped Class: Overcoming Common Hurdles by Edutopia:
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipped-learning-toolkit-common-hurdles-jon-bergmann

platforms like Blackboard and Canvas are playing a bigger role in the flipped learning environment. Other viable options include Google’s Classroom, which “automates” the sharing process but isn’t necessarily an organizational tool.
McCrea, B. (2016). 6 Flipped Learning Technologies To Watch in 2016. THE Journal. Retrieved from https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/03/16/6-flipped-learning-technologies-to-watch-in-2016.aspx

Pros:

  • Helps kids who were absent, stay current.

  • Helps kids who don’t get the lesson the first time in class.

  • Good resource for teacher assistants or student support staff who may not know the curriculum or may not know what to focus on.

  • Can attach Google spreadsheets or other online quizzes to check for comprehension, along with the video link sent to students

Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://www.teachhub.com/pros-and-cons-flipped-classroom
  • Students have more control
  • It promotes student-centered learning and collaboration
  • Access = easier for parents to see what’s going on
  • It can be more efficient
Acedo, M. (2013, November 27). 10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/blended-flipped-learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/
an example of a positive take:
  • Myth #1 – Proponents of the Flipped Classroom Methodology Dislike Lectures
  • Myth #2 – Flipping Your Class Means Getting Rid of Lecturing
  • Myth #3 – Flipping Your Class Will Mean That Students Will Stop Coming to Class
  • Myth #4 – Flipping Your Class Will Require Lots of Technical Knowledge
  • Myth #5 – Flipping Your Class Will Require Huge Amounts of Time
  • Myth #6 – Students Will Not Like the Flipped Class, and Your Teaching Evaluations Will Suffer
Kim, J. (n.d.). 6 Myths of the Flipped Classroom | Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/6-myths-flipped-classroom

Cons:

  • I have a long way to go in my skill set in making the videos interesting (they, to me anyway, are really boring to watch).
  • I’m not sure how much they (the videos) are being utilized. There are just certain items that are learned better through direct one on one contact.
  • I know as I’m teaching, I get direct feedback from my students by looking at their faces and gauging comprehension. I, as a teacher, don’t get that feedback as I’m designing and creating my videos.”
Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://www.teachhub.com/pros-and-cons-flipped-classroom
  • It can create or exacerbate a digital divide
  • It relies on preparation and trust
  • Not naturally a test-prep form of learning
  • Time in front of screens–instead of people and places–is increased
Acedo, M. (2013, November 27). 10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/blended-flipped-learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/
an example of negative take:
  • I dislike the idea of giving my students homework.
  • A lecture by video is still a lecture.
  • I want my students to own their learning.
  • My students need to be able to find and critically evaluate their own resources
Wright, S. (2012, October 8). The Flip: End of a Love Affair. Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://plpnetwork.com/2012/10/08/flip-love-affair/

Research:

Zuber, W. J. (2016). The flipped classroom, a review of the literature. Industrial & Commercial Training, 48(2), 97-103. doi:10.1108/ICT-05-2015-0039 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/ICT-05-2015-0039

although learning styletheories serve as a justification for different learning activities it does not provide the necessarytheoretical framework as to how the activities need to be structured (Bishop and Verleger, 2013). p. 99

One observation from the literature is there is a lack of consistency of models of the FCM (Davieset al.,2013, p. 565) in addition to a lack of research into student performance, (Findlay-Thompson andMombourquette, 2014, p. 65; Euniceet al., 2013) broader impacts on taking up too much of thestudents’time and studies of broader student demographics. In another literature review of the FCM,Bishop and Verleger concur with the observation that there is a lack of consensus as to the definitionof the method and the theoretical frameworks (Bishop and Verleger, 2013). p. 99

The FCM isheavily reliant on technology and this is an important consideration for all who consideremploying the FCM. p. 101

Flipped Classrooms’ may not have any impact on learning:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/23/flipped-classrooms-may-not-have-any-impact-on-learning/

Gross, B., Marinari, M., Hoffman, M., DeSimone, K., & Burke, P. (2015). Flipped @ SBU: Student Satisfaction and the College Classroom. Educational Research Quarterly, 39(2), 36-52.
we found that high levels of student engagement and course satisfaction characterised the students in the flipped courses, without any observable reduction in academic performance.

Hotle, S. L., & Garrow, L. A. (2016). Effects of the Traditional and Flipped Classrooms on Undergraduate Student Opinions and Success. Journal Of Professional Issues In Engineering Education & Practice, 142(1), 1-11. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)EI.1943-5541.0000259
It was found that student performance on quizzes was not significantly different across the traditional and flipped classrooms. A key shortcoming noted with the flipped classroom was students’ inability to ask questions during lectures. Students in flipped classrooms were more likely to attend office hours compared to traditional classroom students, but the difference was not statistically significant.

Heyborne, W. H., & Perrett, J. J. (2016). To Flip or Not to Flip? Analysis of a Flipped Classroom Pedagogy in a General Biology Course. Journal Of College Science Teaching, 45(4), 31-37.
Although the outcomes were mixed, regarding the superiority of either pedagogical approach, there does seem to be a trend toward performance gains using the flipped pedagogy. We strongly advocate for a larger multiclass study to further clarify this important pedagogical question.

Tomory, A., & Watson, S. (2015). Flipped Classrooms for Advanced Science Courses. Journal Of Science Education & Technology, 24(6), 875-887. doi:10.1007/s10956-015-9570-8

 

tech ed trends in 2016

What’s Hot, What’s Not in 2016

Our expert panelists weigh in on education technology to give us their verdict on which approaches to tech-enabled learning will have a major impact, which ones are stagnating and which ones might be better forgotten entirely.

By Greg Thompson 01/12/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/01/12/whats-hot-whats-not-in-2016.aspx

  • Bring Your Own Device (BYOD): Lukewarm to Hot

  • Social Media for Teaching and Learning: Lukewarm to Hot

  • Digital Badges: Mostly Lukewarm

  • Open Educational Resources (OERs): Mostly Hot

  • E-Portfolios: Losing Steam

  • Learning Management Systems (LMS): Lukewarm to Hot

  • Flipped Learning: Mostly Hot (but Equitability a Question)

  • Blended Learning: Unanimously Hot

  • Student Data Privacy Concerns: Unanimously Hot

  • Apps for Learning: A Mostly Lukewarm Mixed Bag

  • Games for Learning: Hot

What are the hot devices?

Cameras like the Canon VIXIA, the Sony HDR-MV1 or the Zoom Q4 or Q8 range from $200 to $400. The secret of these small devices is a tradeoff between video flexibility and audio power. With digital-only zoom, these cameras still deliver full HD video (or better) but with limited distance capabilities. In return, the audio quality is unsurpassed by anything short of a professional boom or wireless microphone setup; most of these cameras feature high-end condenser microphone capsules that will make music or interview recordings shine.

The Chromebook is hot. Seventy-two percent of Chromebook sales were education-related purchases in 2014.

The smartphone is hot. Every day, the smartphone becomes less of a “phone” and more of a device for connecting with others via social media, researching information on the Internet, learning with apps and games and recording experiences with photos and videos.

videonotes for flipped lessons

Creating Flipped Lessons With VideoNotes

 http://practicaledtech.com/2015/01/12/practical-ed-tech-tip-of-the-week-creating-flipped-lessons-with-videonotes/

http://www.videonot.es/

VideoNotes allows you to load a video on the left side of your screen then on the right side of the screen VideoNotes gives you a notepad on which to type.

1. How to Create a Jeopardy-style Game in Google Spreadsheets
2. How to Use Doctopus and Goobric to Grade Google Classroom Assignments
3. Using Timelines as Digital Portfolios and Reflections on Learning
4. How to Add Custom Columns to Padlet Walls
5. ReadWorks Now Offers Poems and Question Sets for K-12 Classrooms
6. PicCollage, ThingLink, and A Visit to the USS Alabama
7. A Couple of Graphing Calculators for Your Chrome Browser

alternatives to lecturing

50 Alternatives To Lecturing

Learning Models

1. Self-directed learning

2. Learning through play

3. Scenario-based learning

4. Game-based learning (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming)

5. Project-based learning (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=project+based)

6. Peer-to-Peer instruction

7. School-to-school instruction (using Skype in the classroom, for example)

8. Learning through projects

9. Problem-based learning

10. Challenge-based learning

11. Inquiry-based learning

12. Mobile learning

13. Gamified learning (gamification)

14. Cross-curricular projects (teaching by topic: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/24/education-reform-finland/)

15. Reciprocal Teaching

16. “Flipped-class” learning

17. Face-to-Face Driver blended learning

18. Rotation blended learning

19. Flex Blended Learning

20. “Online Lab” blended learning

21. Sync Teaching

23. HyFlex Learning

24. Self-guided MOOC

25. Traditional MOOC

26. Competency-Based Learning

27. Question-based learning

Literacy Strategies

28. Write-Around

29. Four Corners

30. Accountable Talk

31. RAFT Assignments

32. Fishbowl

33. Debate

34. Gallery Walk

35. Text Reduction

36. Concentric Circles

37. Traditional Concept-Mapping (teacher-given strategy–“fishbone” cause-effect analysis, for example)

38. Didactic, Personalized Concept Mapping (student designed and personalized for their knowledge-level and thinking patterns)

39. Mock Trial

40. Non-academic video + “academic” questioning

41. Paideia Seminar (http://www.paideia.org/, http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/paideia/, http://www.mtlsd.org/jefferson_middle/stuff/paideia%20seminar%20guidelines.pdf)

42. Symposium

43. Socratic Seminar (https://www.nwabr.org/sites/default/files/SocSem.pdf)

44. QFT Strategy

45. Concept Attainment

46. Directed Reading Thinking Activity

47. Paragraph Shrinking

48. FRAME Routine

49. Jigsaw Strategy

Other 

50. Content-Based Team-Building Activities

51. Learning Simulation

52. Role-Playing

53. Bloom’s Spiral

54. Virtual Field Trip (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/scw/)

55. Physical Field Trip

56. Digital Scavenger Hunt  (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/)

57. Physical Scavenger Hunt

http://www.teachthought.com/teaching/50-alternatives-to-lecturing/

 

 

Academy of distinguished teachers

Academy of distinguished teachers, Innovation

University of Minnesota, McNamara Alumni Center – Twin Cities Campus. April 8, 2015

Full program available here: https://guidebook.com/g/adt/


Randy Bass

Randy Bass

Randy Bass
https://www.linkedin.com/pub/randall-bass/14/94/77

flipping disruption into Design

there are two type of universities: the ones that are in control of change and the ones, which are pressed to change.

what kind of education is needed at this moment of history.
Assumptions: 5-10 years will be for a first time outcompeted in terms of delivering information and degrees. What is that the university can do distinctively well that WWW cannot do: mentored learning and the arc of learning (beyond collection of granular separate learning)

book: The New Division of Labor. http://www.amazon.com/The-New-Division-Labor-Computers/dp/0691124027
External forces of potential disruption: 1. MOOCs, nearly free education, 2. skilled-based learning (Codeacademy, Udacity), 3. data analytic 4. public pressure on access, metrics of impact.

Gartner group (http://www.gartner.com/technology/home.jsp) hype cycle : overvalued in a short term and undervalued in a long term. MOOC is excellent example.
NMC: competing models of education.

learning analytics. adaptive learning, intelligent tutoring etc. Open Learning Initative. http://oli.cmu.edu/

In the 19th century, railroads companies which were in the business of railroad companies went under; the ones which were in the business of transportation survived. Parallel, universities, which are in the business of delivering information will die out; the ones, which will survive must look to a very different picture.

formative wider outcomes

formative wider outcomes

integration and dis-integration

integration and dis-integration

the white light

high impact integrative curriculum

high impact integrative curriculum

what makes high inpact practices high impact

what makes high inpact practices high impact

formal versus informal

formal versus informal

integrative versus disintegrative


Selected sessions:

 

The Value of Assessing Outcomes of Teaching Methodologies to guide instructional design

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10594685/


game-based learning:

Upping your Game – Best Practices in Using Game-Based Learning

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10594684/

Implementing Game Dynamics in Moodle

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10693434/

visuals:

Engaging Students through Video Integration

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676389/

Innovative Options for Recording Your Own Course Videos

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676375/

Using Flipgrid Video Commentary to Share Student Learning

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676361/

————

Enhancing learning with online narrated presentations using VoiceThread

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676372/

flipped:

Essential Technology & Tools for Flipping Your Classroom

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676385/

Improving Delivery of Technical Course Content through Incremental Use of Classroom “Flipping”

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676376/

Flipping our classrooms: Faculty from UMD’s Flipped Classroom Community of Practice sharing their experiences.

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10594850/

The Pros and Cons of Flipping the Classroom

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676323/


Using Google Forms for Student Group Evaluations

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10734863/


Library:

The University Libraries Partnership for Affordable Content – Enhance Student Learning and Save Them Money!

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676358/


CRS Tophat:

Using Classroom Debates as an Interactive Learning Tool in a Course on Companion Animal Ethical Issues

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676369/


 

online:

Adapting the Harvard Case Method for Online Courses

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10595018/

Readiness Assessment for Online Courses

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10595040/

 

technology showcase

technology showcase general view

5 4 3 2 1

1 2