Posts Tagged ‘games’

IM554 discussion on GBL

IM554 discussion on Game Based Learning

Here is the “literature”:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/19/recommendations-for-games-and-gaming-at-lrs/
this link reflects my recommendations to the SCSU library, based on my research and my publication: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

Here are also Slideshare shows from conferences’ presentations on the topic:

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gamification-and-byox-in-academic-libraries-low-end-practical-approach

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gaming-and-gamification-in-academic-and-library-settings

Topic :Gaming and Gamification in Academic Settings

  1. Intro: why is it important to discuss this trend
    1. The fabric of the current K12 and higher ed students: Millennials and Gen Z
    2. The pedagogical theories and namely constructivism
      1. Csikszentmihalyi’s “flow” concept (being in the zone)
      2. Active learning
      3. Sociocultural Theory
      4. Project-Based Learning
    3. The general milieu of increasing technology presence, particularly of gaming environment
    4. The New Media Consortium and the Horizon Report

Discussion: Are the presented reasons sufficient to justify a profound restructure of curricula and learning spaces?

  1. Definition and delineation
    1. Games
    2. Serious Games
    3. Gamification
    4. Game-based learning
    5. Digital game-based learning
    6. Games versus gamification
    7. Simulations, the new technological trends such as human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: Is there a way to build a simpler but comprehensive structure/definition to encompass the process of gaming and gamification in education?

  1. Gaming and Gamification
    1. Pros
    2. Cons
    3. Debates

Discussion: Which side are you on and why?

  1. Gaming and Gamification and BYOD (or BYOx)
    1. gaming consoles versus gaming over wi-fi
    2. gaming using mobile devices instead of consoles
    3. human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: do you see a trend to suggest that either one or the other will prevail? Convergence?

  1. Gaming in Education
    1. student motivation, student-centered learning, personalized learning
    2. continued practice, clear goals and immediate feedback
    3. project-based learning, Minecraft and SimCity EDU
    4. Gamification of learning versus learning with games
    5. organizations to promote gaming and gamification in education (p. 6 http://scsu.mn/1F008Re)
    6. the “chocolate-covered broccoli” problem

Discussion: why gaming and gamification is not accepted in a higher rate? what are the hurdles to enable greater faster acceptance? What do you think, you can do to accelerate this process?

  1. Gaming in an academic library
    1. why the academic library? sandbox for experimentation
    2. the connection between digital literacy and gaming and gamificiation
    3. Gilchrist and Zald’s model for instruction design through assessment
    4. the new type of library instruction:
      in house versus out-of-the box games. Gamification of the process
      http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

Discussion: based on the example (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/), how do you see transforming academic library services to meet the demands of 21st century education?

  1. Gaming, gamification and assessment (badges)
    1. inability of current assessments to evaluate games as part of the learning process
    2. “microcredentialing” through digital badges
    3. Mozilla Open Badges and Badgestack
    4. leaderboards

Discussion: How do you see a transition from the traditional assessment to a new and more flexible academic assessment?

educause 2015

8:00 AM11:30 AM

Meeting Room 231-232
Session Type: Morning Seminar
Meeting Room 140-141
Session Type: Afternoon Seminar
Meeting Room 241-242
Session Type: Afternoon Seminar
Sagamore Ballroom 6
Meeting Room 132-133
Session Type: Discussion Session
Sagamore Ballroom 4
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Shoji Kajita
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Leslie Kennedy
Session Type: Poster Session
Poster Sessions, Exhibit Hall H-K
Jon W. Dunn
Session Type: Poster Session
Sagamore Ballroom 4
Rob Peregoodoff
Meeting Room 237-238
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 231-232
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 132-133
Session Type: Discussion Session
Meeting Room 203-204
Wabash Ballroom 2
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 201-202
David Stack
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 239
Rose A. Rocchio
Session Type: Discussion Session
Sagamore Ballroom 5
Jaime Casap
Session Type: Featured Session
Meeting Room 201-202
Session Type: Concurrent Session
Meeting Room 203-204
Meeting Room 134-135
Tanya Joosten
Session Type: Discussion Session
Meeting Room 237-238
Session Type: Concurrent Session

Super Mario gets artificial intelligence

Researchers create ‘self-aware’ Super Mario with artificial intelligence

http://mashable.com/2015/01/19/super-mario-artificial-intelligence/

A team of German researchers has used artificial intelligence to create a “self-aware” version of Super Mario who can respond to verbal commands and automatically play his own game.

Artificial Intelligence helps Mario play his own game

Students at the University of Tubingen have used Mario as part of their efforts to find out how the human brain works.

The cognitive modelling unit claim their project has generated “a fully functional program” and “an alive and somewhat intelligent artificial agent”.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/30879456

Can Super Mario Save Artificial Intelligence?

The most popular approaches today focus on Big Data, or mimicking humansthat already know how to do some task. But sheer mimicry breaks down when one gives a machine new tasks, and, as I explained a few weeks ago, Big Data approaches tend to excel at finding correlations without necessarily being able to induce the rules of the game. If Big Data alone is not a powerful enough tool to induce a strategy in a complex but well-defined game like chess, then that’s a problem, since the real world is vastly more open-ended, and considerably more complicated.

http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/can-super-mario-save-artificial-intelligence