Posts Tagged ‘Google Glass’

MS Hololens in nursing

Could HoloLens’ Augmented Reality Change How We Study the Human Body?

Case Western Reserve University is helping to revolutionize medical-science studies with a new technology from Microsoft.

Microsoft’s forthcoming AR headset, HoloLens, is at the forefront of this technology. The company calls it the first holographic computer. In AR, instead of being surrounded by a virtual world, viewers see virtual objects projected on top of reality through a transparent lens.

“With a computer or tablet, we always have to look at a screen. … The technology is always in between the people. With HoloLens, the technology very quickly becomes invisible, and we have seen groups of people have very intense interactions around models that are completely digital — they aren’t really there.”

More on wearables in this IMS blog:

Google Glass versus Microsoft HoloLens

Here’s one thing Google and Microsoft agree on (and they’re right)

Virtual reality, like the new Facebook Oculus and HTC Vive, completely immerse you inside a computer generated world. It’s like being inside a 360-degree video game, or movie, or computer-generated simulation.

according to a report in The Information today, Google’s long-term bet is on augmented reality. The company is making not one but several follow-ups to Glass, and has a project called “Tango” that aims to outfit smartphones with computerized “eyes” that can map a 3D space.

More on augmented reality in this IMS blog

wearables by Microsoft Facebook and Google

The competition narrows down between Microsoft HoloLens, Facebook Oculus and Google Glass. Each of them bets on different possibilities, which wearable bring.

Facebook Oculus

Also available as podcast:

Microsoft HoloLens

Google Glass

Pls consider our related IMS blog entries:

Microsoft’s HoloLens

Microsoft’s HoloLens explained: How it works and why it’s different

Microsoft’s HoloLens prototype has all the innards of a computer built directly into the headset. That means no cords or even a smartphone required.

Just as VR rivals Oculus (owned by Facebook) and Google are trying to reimagine virtual experiences with their head-worn devices, Microsoft wants us to imagine a world without screens, where information merely floats in front of you.


Wearable technologies

Wearable technologies survey – win an iPad Mini

You are invited to participate in a study of the current and potential applications of wearable technologies such as Google Glasses in Higher Education. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete a confidential online survey that explores your knowledge and beliefs surrounding the educational applications of wearable technologies. The questionnaire contains a combination of short answer and Likert-scale questions, including background information about yourself and your teaching career/experience, your perceptions of wearable technologies, your ideas about use cases and potential avenues of future research.

The survey should take approximately 10 to 15 minutes to complete. You are in no way obliged to take part in this survey, but if you do you can go into a draw to win an iPad mini.

If you are interested or would like more information please follow the link below.

Many thanks to those who participate and if you have any colleagues who would be interested in this study then please forward this email on to them.

Best wishes,


Dr Matt Bower

School of Education

Rm C5A927 Macquarie University

NSW 2109 Australia

T: +61 2 98508626


Integrate Google Glass Into Classroom

Integrate Google Glass Into Classroom

Please consider our previous postings about Google Glass:

What you don’t want it to end up being is what a lot of experts call, you know, the ‘thousand-dollar pencil,’” said Eric Carbaugh, a faculty member with the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. “Maybe we give kids tablets or Google Glass, or whatever it might be. There’s this tech tool that you integrate into the classroom, and what you end up seeing is that those tech tools are essentially used to take notes.”

New terms and issues: Virtual Reality, Sim Sickness, Postural Sway…

Virtual Reality’s Next Hurdle: Overcoming ‘Sim Sickness’

One problem is the resulting “postural sway,” or postural instability and hand-eye coordination challenges.

Additional reading:

Plamen: similar issues with Google Glass. Here is some more info on the issue:

Rethinking Motion Sickness

Pls have other IMS blog entries on Google Glass


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