Posts Tagged ‘grant’

research grant WWI

Research Grants Programme: 2018 Call for Submissions (Open)

Deadline: 5 October 2018 23:59 CET Theme: The First World War.

https://pro.europeana.eu/post/research-grants-programme-2018-call-for-submissions-open

Eligibility

The Research Grants Programme is intended for early career scholars of all nationalities and in any field of the Humanities. They must have a particular interest in cultural heritage and take a digital humanities approach. Applicants must hold a PhD, with no more than 7 years of experience after the completion of their PhD. With duly justified exceptions, their projects must be hosted by institutions, i.e. a university, a research centre, a library lab or a museum, working in one of the European Union member states.

MnSCU multicampus grant

SUBSCRIBE FOR THE YOUTUBE CHANNEL WITH ALL VIDEOS BELOW

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr6jv43PYW-FQDlSbxFQg9g

June 20:

June 18:
https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/posts/1572411372869354

June 13 work in the lab:

Facebook Live: June 13, 2018: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/videos/1562686293841862/

#chemistry #grant w Dr. Kannan Sivaprakasam

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on Friday, June 1, 2018

#NorthHennepinCommunityCollege students working on projects from the multicampus grant

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, June 6, 2018

digital access to nonprint collections

Digital Access to Non-Print Collections

University libraries have held collections of books and printed material throughout their existence and continue to be perceived as repositories for physical collections.  Other non-print specialized collections of interest have been held in various departments on campus such as Anthropology, Art, and Biology due to the unique needs of the collections and their usage.  With the advent of electronic media, it becomes possible to store these non-print collections in a central place, such as the Libray.

The skills needed to curate artifacts from an archeological excavation, biological specimens from various life forms, and sculpture work are very different, making it difficult for smaller university libraries to properly hold, curate, and make available such collections.  In addition, faculty in the various departments tend to want those collections near their coursework and research, so it can be readily available to students and researchers. With the expansion of online learning, the need for such availability becomes increasingly pronounced.

With the advent of 3 dimensional (3D) scanners, it has become possible for a smaller library to hold digital representations of these collections in an archive that can be curated from the various departments by experts in the discipline.  The Library can then make the digital representations available to other researchers, students, and the public through kiosks in the Library or via the Internet.  Current methods to scan and store an artifact in 3Dstill require expertise not often found in a Library.

We propose to use existing technology to build an easy-to-use system to scan smaller artifacts in 3D.  The project will include purchase and installation of a workstation in the Library where the artifact collection can be accessed using a large touch-screen monitor, and a portable, easy-to-use 3D scanning station.  Curators of collections from various departments on the St. Cloud State University campus can check out the scanning station, connect to power and Internet where the collection is located, and scan their collection into the libraries digital archives, making the collection easily available to students, other researchers and the public.

The project would include assembly of two workstations previously mentioned and potentially develop the robotic scanner.  Software would be produced to automate the workflow from the scanner to archiving the digital representation and then make the collection available on the Internet.

This project would be a collaboration between the St. Cloud State University Library (https://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/  and  Visualization Laboratory (https://www.facebook.com/SCSUVizLab/). The project would use the expertise and services of the St. Cloud State Visualization Laboratory.  Dr. Plamen Miltenoff, a faculty with the Library will coordinate the Library initiatives related to the use of the 3D scanner. Mark Gill, Visualization Engineer, and Dr. Mark Petzold, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering will lead a group of students in developing the software to automate the scanning, storage, and retrieval of the 3D models.  The Visualization Lab has already had success in 3D scanning objects for other departments and in creating interactive displays allowing retrieval of various digital content, including 3D scanned objects such animal skulls and video. A collaboration between the Library, VizLab and the Center for Teaching and Learning (, https://www.stcloudstate.edu/teaching/) will enable campus faculty to overcome technical and financial obstacles. It will promote the VizLab across campus, while sharing its technical resources with the Library and making those resources widely available across campus. Such work across silos will expose the necessity (if any) of standardization and will help faculty embrace stronger collaborative practices as well as spur the process of reproduction of best practices across disciplines.

Budget:

Hardware Cost
42” Touch Screen Monitor $2200
Monitor Mount $400
2 Computer Workstations $5000
Installation $500
Cart for Mobile 3D Scanner $1000
3D Scanner (either purchase or develop in-house) $2000
Total $11100

 

The budget covers two computer workstations.  One will be installed in the library as a way to access the digital catalog, and will include a 42 inch touch screen monitor mounted to a wall or stand.  This installation will provide students a way to interact with the models in a more natural way.  The second workstation would be mounted on a mobile cart and connected to the 3D scanner.  This would allow collection curators from different parts of campus to check out the scanner and scan their collections.  The ability to bring the scanner to the collection would increase the likelihood  the collections to be scanned into the library collection.

The 3D scanner would either be purchased off-the shelf or designed by a student team from the Engineering Department.  A solution will be sought to use and minimize the amount of training the operator would need.  If the scanner is developed in-house, a simple optical scanner such as an XBox Kinect device and a turntable or robotic arm will be used.  Support for the XBox Kinect is built into Microsoft Visual Studio, thus creating the interface efficient and costeffective.

Timeline

Task Start Time End Time
Catalog Software October 2017 December 2017
Scanner Interface October 2017 March 2018
Web Interface January 2018 May 2018
System Installation March 2018 May 2018

Personnel

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

320-308-3072

Dr. Miltenoff is part of a workgroup within the academic library, which works with faculty, students and staff on the application of new technologies in education. Dr. Miltenoff’s most recent research with Mark Gill is on the impact of Video 360 on students during library orientation: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

 

Mark Petzold, Ph.D.
mcpetzold@stcloudstate.edu
320-308-4182
Dr. Petzold is an Associate Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering.  His current projects involve visualization of meteorological data in a virtual reality environment and research into student retention issues.  He is co-PI on a $5 million NSF S-STEM grant which gives scholarships to low income students and investigates issues around student transitions to college.

Mark Gill

mcgill@stcloudstate.edu

320-308-5605

Mr. Gill is a Visualization Engineer for the College of Science and Engineering and runs the Visualization Laboratory.  He has worked for several major universities as well as Stennis Space Center and Mechdyne, Inc.  He holds a Masters of Science in Software Engineering.

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University of Nevada, Reno and Pennsylvania State University 41 campus libraries to include collaborative spaces where faculty and students gather to transform virtual ideas into reality.

Maker Commons in the Modern Library: Six Reasons 3D Printers Should be in Your School’s Library

Maker Commons in the Modern Library 6 REASONS 3D PRINTERS SHOULD BE IN YOUR LIBRARY

1. Librarians Know How to Share 2. Librarians Work Well with IT People 3. Librarians Serve Everybody 4. Librarians Can Fill Learning Gaps 5. Librarians like Student Workers 6. Librarians are Cross-Discipline

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more on grants in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=grant

Large-scale visualization

The future of collaboration: Large-scale visualization

 http://usblogs.pwc.com/emerging-technology/the-future-of-collaboration-large-scale-visualization/

More data doesn’t automatically lead to better decisions. A shortage of skilled data scientists has hindered progress towards translation of information into actionable business insights. In addition, traditionally dense spreadsheets and linear slideshows are ineffective to present discoveries when dealing with Big Data’s dynamic nature. We need to evolve how we capture, analyze and communicate data.

Large-scale visualization platforms have several advantages over traditional presentation methods. They blur the line between the presenter and audience to increase the level of interactivity and collaboration. They also offer simultaneous views of both macro and micro perspectives, multi-user collaboration and real-time data interaction, and a limitless number of visualization possibilities – critical capabilities for rapidly understanding today’s large data sets.

Visualization walls enable presenters to target people’s preferred learning methods, thus creating a more effective communication tool. The human brain has an amazing ability to quickly glean insights from patterns – and great visualizations make for more efficient storytellers.

Grant: Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries and Learning Spaces
Award amount: $40,000
Funder: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Lead institution: North Carolina State University Libraries
Due date: 13 August 2017
Notification date: 15 September 2017
Website: https://immersivescholar.org
Contact: immersivescholar@ncsu.edu

Project Description

NC State University, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, invites proposals from institutions interested in participating in a new project for Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries and Learning Spaces. The grant aims to 1) build a community of practice of scholars and librarians who work in large-scale multimedia to help visually immersive scholarly work enter the research lifecycle; and 2) overcome technical and resource barriers that limit the number of scholars and libraries who may produce digital scholarship for visualization environments and the impact of generated knowledge. Libraries and museums have made significant strides in pioneering the use of large-scale visualization technologies for research and learning. However, the utilization, scale, and impact of visualization environments and the scholarship created within them have not reached their fullest potential. A logical next step in the provision of technology-rich, visual academic spaces is to develop best practices and collaborative frameworks that can benefit individual institutions by building economies of scale among collaborators.

The project contains four major elements:

  1. An initial meeting and priority setting workshop that brings together librarians, scholars, and technologists working in large-scale, library and museum-based visualization environments.
  2. Scholars-in-residence at NC State over a multi-year period who pursue open source creative projects, working in collaboration with our librarians and faculty, with the potential to address the articulated limitations.
  3. Funding for modest, competitive block grants to other institutions working on similar challenges for creating, disseminating, validating, and preserving digital scholarship created in and for large-scale visual environments.
  4. A culminating symposium that brings together representatives from the scholars-in-residence and block grant recipient institutions to share and assess results, organize ways of preserving and disseminating digital products produced, and build on the methods, templates, and tools developed for future projects.

Work Summary
This call solicits proposals for block grants from library or museum systems that have visualization installations. Block grant recipients can utilize funds for ideas ranging from creating open source scholarly content for visualization environments to developing tools and templates to enhance sharing of visualization work. An advisory panel will select four institutions to receive awards of up to $40,000. Block grant recipients will also participate in the initial priority setting workshop and the culminating symposium. Participating in a block grant proposal does not disqualify an individual from later applying for one of the grant-supported scholar-in-residence appointments.
Applicants will provide a statement of work that describes the contributions that their organization will make toward the goals of the grant. Applicants will also provide a budget and budget justification.
Activities that can be funded through block grants include, but are not limited to:

  • Commissioning work by a visualization expert
  • Hosting a visiting scholar, artist, or technologist residency
  • Software development or adaptation
  • Development of templates and methodologies for sharing and scaling content utilizing open source software
  • Student or staff labor for content or software development or adaptation
  • Curricula and reusable learning objects for digital scholarship and visualization courses
  • Travel (if necessary) to the initial project meeting and culminating workshop
  • User research on universal design for visualization spaces

Funding for operational expenditures, such as equipment, is not allowed for any grant participant.

Application
Send an application to immersivescholar@ncsu.edu by the end of the day on 13 August 2017 that includes the following:

  • Statement of work (no more than 1000 words) of the project idea your organization plans to develop, its relationship to the overall goals of the grant, and the challenges to be addressed.
  • List the names and contact information for each of the participants in the funded project, including a brief description of their current role, background, expertise, interests, and what they can contribute.
  • Project timeline.
  • Budget table with projected expenditures.
  • Budget narrative detailing the proposed expenditures

Selection and Notification Process
An advisory panel made up of scholars, librarians, and technologists with experience and expertise in large-scale visualization and/or visual scholarship will review and rank proposals. The project leaders are especially keen to receive proposals that develop best practices and collaborative frameworks that can benefit individual institutions by building a community of practice and economies of scale among collaborators.

Awardees will be selected based on:

  • the ability of their proposal to successfully address one or both of the identified problems;
  • the creativity of the proposed activities;
  • relevant demonstrated experience partnering with scholars or students on visualization projects;
  • whether the proposal is extensible;
  • feasibility of the work within the proposed time-frame and budget;
  • whether the project work improves or expands access to large-scale visual environments for users; and
  • the participant’s ability to expand content development and sharing among the network of institutions with large-scale visual environments.

Awardees will be required to send a representative to an initial meeting of the project cohort in Fall 2017.

Awardees will be notified by 15 September 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact immersivescholar@ncsu.edu.

–Mike Nutt Director of Visualization Services Digital Library Initiatives, NCSU Libraries
919.513.0651 http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/do/visualization

 

Serious Play Conference 2017

Serious Play Conference

2017 Conference Program

Ben Ward, Kansas State University
Joelle Pitts, Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor, Kansas State University Libraries
Stefan Yates, Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor, Kansas State University

Transmedia, unicorns, and marketing, oh my!: The not-quite epic failure of transmedia design efforts in Oz.

Transmedia storytelling, also called Alternate Reality Games, have been designed to intrigue, engage, and even engineer groups of people since the release of The Beast in 2001. A few colleges and Universities have employed them to engage their student populations and even teach them a thing or two using narrative game mechanics. Presenters will chronicle a highly successful transmedia design effort at Kansas State University, and the subsequent annual efforts to replicate the engagement and enthusiasm. Best practices and not-quite epic failures will be discussed, as will tips (and laments) for marketing to our current student populations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmedia_storytelling

http://www.tstoryteller.com/transmedia-storytelling

http://henryjenkins.org/2007/03/transmedia_storytelling_101.html

http://athinklab.com/transmedia-storytelling/what-is-transmedia-storytelling/

Transmedia Storytelling: The Complete Guide

What is Transmedia Storytelling?

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401760/transmedia-storytelling/

http://nerdist.com/a-look-at-transmedia-storytelling/

Glenn Larsen, National Science Foundation
SBIR and Other Funding Sources for Your Game

The National Science Foundation (NSF) awards nearly $190 million annually to startups and small businesses through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, transforming scientific discovery into products and services with commercial and societal impact. The equity-free funds support research and development (R&D) across almost all areas of science and technology helping companies de-risk technology for commercial success. The NSF is an independent federal agency with a budget of about $7 billion that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. For more information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/SBIR.

Karen Schrier, Assistant Professor/Director of Games and Emerging Media, Marist College
Design Principles for Knowledge Games

Lisa Castaneda, CEO, foundry10|
Mark Suter, Teacher, Bernards Township Schools

How Teachers Can Use VR in the Classroom: Beyond the Novelty

Over the past three years, foundry10, an education research organization, has been studying the potential of Virtual Reality in Education. The research has focused on the implementation, immersion dynamics, and integration of content across the curriculum.

Working with a variety of classroom curricular areas, with students and teachers from 30 schools, we have gathered data as well as anecdotal stories to help illustrate how VR functions in a learning environment. Students from all over the US, Canada and parts of Europe, completed pre/post surveys and educators participated in extensive qualitative interviews in order to better understand what it means to learn with virtual reality.

Please join foundry10 CEO Lisa Castaneda and teachers Steve Isaacs and Mark Suter as we share what we have learned about how to effectively utilize VR for classroom learning through content creation (both inside and outside of the virtual world), content consumption and content integration and overcoming the obstacles inherent in implementation.

Lisa Castaneda, Steven Isaacs & Mark Suter – Virtual Reality in Education: Exploring the New Frontier from SeriousGamesAssoc

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more on gaming in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming