Posts Tagged ‘ID instructional design’

Learning analytics, student satisfaction, and student performance

Learning analytics, student satisfaction, and student performance at the UK Open University

https://www.tonybates.ca/2018/05/11/11025/
Rienties and his team linked 151 modules (courses) and 111,256 students with students’ behaviour, satisfaction and performance at the Open University UK, using multiple regression models.

There is little correlation between student course evaluations and student performance

The design of the course matters

Student feedback on the quality of a course is really important but it is more useful as a conversation between students and instructors/designers than as a quantitative ranking of the quality of a course.  In fact using learner satisfaction as a way to rank teaching is highly misleading. Learner satisfaction encompasses a very wide range of factors as well as the teaching of a particular course. 

this research provides quantitative evidence of the importance of learning design in online and distance teaching. Good design leads to better learning outcomes. We need a shift in the power balance between university and college subject experts and learning designers resulting in the latter being treated as at least equals in the teaching process.

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more on learning analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+analytics

Gestalt and Visual Communication

Gestalt principles in User Interface design.

How to become a master manipulator of Visual Communication.

Jan 16, 2018 Eleana Gkogka

https://medium.muz.li/gestalt-principles-in-ui-design-6b75a41e9965

Great designers understand the powerful role that psychology plays in visual perception. What happens when someone’s eye meets your design creations?

Gestalt (form, shape in German) is a group of visual perception principles developed by German psychologists in 1920s. It is built on the theory that “an organized whole, is perceived as greater than the sum of its parts”.

four key ideas:

Emergence

People tend to identify elements first in their general outlined form. Our brain recognizes a simple, well-defined object quicker than a detailed one.

Reification

People can recognize objects even when there are parts of them missing. Our brain matches what we see with familiar patterns stored in our memory and fills in the gaps.

Multi-Stability

People will often interpret ambiguous objects in more than one ways. Our brains will bounce back and forth between the alternatives seeking certainty. As a result, one view will become more dominant while the other one will get harder to see.

Invariance

People can recognise simple objects independently of their rotation, scale and translation. Our brain can perceive objects from different perspectives, despite their different appearance.

Proximity

Elements arranged close to each other are perceived as more related than those placed further apart. This way different elements are viewed mainly as a group rather than as individual elements.

the Common Region principle

A good Common Region example would be the card UI pattern; a well defined rectangular space with different bits of information presented as one. Banners and tables are good examples as well.

Similarity

Elements sharing similar visual characteristics are perceived to be more related than those not sharing similar characteristics.

We can use the principle of Similarity in navigation, links, buttons, headings, call to actions and more.

Closure

A group of elements are often perceived to be a single recognisable form or figure. The Closure also occurs when an object is incomplete, or parts of it are not enclosed.

We can use the Closure principle in Iconography, where simplicity helps with communicating meaning, swiftly and clearly.

Symmetry

Symmetrical elements tend to perceived as belonging together regardless of their distance, giving us a feeling of solidity and order.

It’s good to use Symmetry for portfolios, galleries, product displays, listings, navigation, banners, and any content-heavy page.

Continuation

Elements arranged in a line or a soft curve are perceived to be more related than those arranged randomly or in a harsh line.

The linear arrangement of rows and columns are good examples of Continuity. We can use them in menus and sub-menus, lists, product arrangements, carousels, services or process/progress displays.

Common Fate

Elements moving towards the same direction are perceived as more related than those moving in different directions, or not moving at all.

We can use the Common Fate principle in expandable menus, accordions, tool-tips, product sliders, parallax scrolls and swiping indicators.

User Interface Design isn’t all about pretty pixels and sparkly graphics. It’s mainly about communication, performance and convenience.

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more on ID in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

influential tools for online learning

Online Learning’s ‘Greatest Hits’

Robert Ubell (Columnist)     Feb 20, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-02-20-online-learning-s-greatest-hits

dean of web-based distance learning

Learning Management Systems

Neck and neck for the top spot in the LMS academic vendor race are Blackboard—the early entry and once-dominant player—and coming-up quickly from behind, the relatively new contender, Canvas, each serving about 6.5 million students . The LMS market today is valued at $9.2 billion.

Digital Authoring Systems

Faced with increasingly complex communication technologies—voice, video, multimedia, animation—university faculty, expert in their own disciplines, find themselves technically perplexed, largely unprepared to build digital courses.

instructional designers, long employed by industry, joined online academic teams, working closely with faculty to upload and integrate interactive and engaging content.

nstructional designers, as part of their skillset, turned to digital authoring systems, software introduced to stimulate engagement, encouraging virtual students to interface actively with digital materials, often by tapping at a keyboard or touching the screen as in a video game. Most authoring software also integrates assessment tools, testing learning outcomes.

With authoring software, instructional designers can steer online students through a mixtape of digital content—videos, graphs, weblinks, PDFs, drag-and-drop activities, PowerPoint slides, quizzes, survey tools and so on. Some of the systems also offer video editing, recording and screen downloading options

Adaptive Learning

As with a pinwheel set in motion, insights from many disciplines—artificial intelligence, cognitive science, linguistics, educational psychology and data analytics—have come together to form a relatively new field known as learning science, propelling advances in a new personalized practice—adaptive learning.

MOOCs

Of the top providers, Coursera, the Wall Street-financed company that grew out of the Stanford breakthrough, is the champion with 37 million learners, followed by edX, an MIT-Harvard joint venture, with 18 million. Launched in 2013, XuetangX, the Chinese platform in third place, claims 18 million.

Former Yale President Rick Levin, who served as Coursera’s CEO for a few years, speaking by phone last week, was optimistic about the role MOOCs will play in the digital economy. “The biggest surprise,” Levin argued, “is how strongly MOOCs have been accepted in the corporate world to up-skill employees, especially as the workforce is being transformed by job displacement. It’s the right time for MOOCs to play a major role.”

In virtual education, pedagogy, not technology, drives the metamorphosis from absence to presence, illusion into reality. Skilled online instruction that introduces peer-to-peer learning, virtual teamwork and other pedagogical innovations stimulate active learning. Online learning is not just another edtech product, but an innovative teaching practice. It’s a mistake to think of digital education merely as a device you switch on and off like a garage door.

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

Evolving Field of Instructional Design

Ace of All Trades: New Research Looks at Evolving Field of Instructional Design

By Marguerite McNeal     May 6, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-05-06-ace-of-all-trades-new-research-looks-at-evolving-field-of-instructional-design

They lurk behind the scenes of a rapidly growing number of courses at colleges and universities, yet instructional designers are an elusive bunch. Their field is exploding—The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked it as one of the top 10 trends in higher ed this year—as more institutions pursue online and blended-learning offerings. But there hasn’t been much consensus on the role of instructional designers across institutions.

estimates at least 13,000 professionals are in the field at higher-ed institutions. Findings provide a glimpse of who instructional designers are:

  • The average age of IDs is 45 years old
  • 67 percent are female
  • 87 percent have master’s degrees
  • More than half have teaching experience

IDs reported that their duties vary from day to day, but that their work generally fits into four buckets: design (e.g., creating new or redeveloping old courses); management (e.g., overseeing projects from cradle to grave); training (e.g., helping faculty use new technologies); and support (e.g., providing timely help for LMS questions from faculty).

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/webinar/instructional-designers-higher-education-role-responsibilities-experiences-ids/

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/webinar/classroom-campus-wide-leveraging-instructional-designers-different-scales/

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/webinar/moving-innovative-institution-forward-tools-strategies-instructional-designers/

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more on ID in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

game based learning

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-01-20-game-based-learning-has-practical-applications-for-nontraditional-learners

Muzzy Lane Software, a Newbury, Mass.-based game development platform.

The study, “The Potential for Game-based Learning to Improve Outcomes for Nontraditional Students,” is based on research funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and includes insights from a survey of 1,700 students, 11 in-person focus groups and interviews with teachers and school leaders. Educators said games could be especially helpful in several areas: auto-assessing whether students can apply what they’ve learned, building employment competencies and improving study skills.

Definition: Muzzy Lane characterizes them as learners who meet two of the following criteria: – returning to school after pausing their education,
– balancing education with work and family responsibilities,
– lower-income,
– English as a second language learners, or
– the first members of their families to attend college.

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more about game based learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=game+based+learning

2019 Educause Horizon Report

2019 Horizon Report

Tuesday, April 23, 2019 https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/4/2019-horizon-report

https://library.educause.edu/-/media/files/library/2019/4/2019horizonreport.pdf

p. 8 Modularized and Disaggregated Degrees

Only 2% of institutions have deployed digital microcredentials (including badging) institution-wide, but 29% are expanding or planning their use. —EDUCAUSE Strategic Technologies, 2019

p. 15 Increasing Demand for Digital Learning Experience and Instructional Design Expertise

A driving factor for mobile learning is the ownership of mobile devices, particularly the smartphone. In 2018, the Pew Research Center reported that 59% of adults globally own a smartphone, and research from the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research indicated that 95% of undergraduate students own smartphones. As mobile device ownership and usage have increased, mobile learning is no longer just focused on asynchronous interaction, content creation, and reference. More emphasis is emerging on content that is responsive instead of adaptive and on creating microlearning experiences that can sync across multiple devices and give learners the flexibility to learn on the device of their choice

p. 25 Mixed Reality

p. 36 Fail or Scale: AR and MR –
In 2016, the Horizon Expert Panel determined that augmented reality and virtual reality were two to three years from widespread adoption. By 2018, the notion of mixed reality was, at four to five years from adoption, even further out.

p. 38 Bryan Alexander: Gaming and Gamification (Fail or Scale)

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more on the Horizon reports in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=horizon+report

online discussions activities

What Makes a Question Effective?

Thursday, April 18, 3:00–4:00 p.m. CDT

We answer the question we are asked. Asking good questions improves instructor/student communications and designing successful discussions begin by drafting good questions. Many of us are looking for ways to improve online discussion activities: let’s start with the questions we ask. Through a presentation and a facilitated discussion, we will explore how to get the type of responses we are looking for by looking at what makes a question effective.

About the presenter: Treden Wagoner, Instructional Designer, has an MA in Education and over 20 years’ teaching experience. He has specialized in education technology since 2002. As an instructional designer, Treden works with CEHD instructors to develop effective course sites and the integration of technology for teaching and learning. His interest in asking good questions began when he was an art museum educator.

Webinar details

Webinar link

Date: Thursday, April 18, 2019, 3:00−4:00 p.m. CDT

Code: 746 250 839

Password: MNLC@2019

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previous webinars’ recordings:

youtube iconLearning Commons YouTube Channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL5D8pOXtaGRV512wUQt5Qg

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more on instructional design in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

Workshop on XR at NerComp 2019

XR mission possible from Plamen Miltenoff

https://events.educause.edu/special-topic-events/nercomp-annual-conference/2019/agenda/xr-mission-possible-separate-registration-is-required

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1giTtWQST4FkryY8XA8jJ04Ow8uI4wJiRoYo7I1Ot1U4/edit#

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1BArsT4T0y73Ez9X_ZtYpJrUYYJmsKso2IMk_cAOM55Q/edit?usp=sharing

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RMzYj2gzKClK-DJ5K7FIIVpUnr1563n7K52XmcpEgjQ/edit

 

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