Posts Tagged ‘intellectual property’

open access symposium 2018 digital libraries

The ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in 2018 (JCDL 2018L:
https://2018.jcdl.org/) will be held in conjunction with UNT Open Access
Symposium 2018 (https://openaccess.unt.edu/symposium/2018) on June 3 – 6, 2018
in Fort Worth, Texas, the rustic and artistic threshold into the American
West. JCDL welcomes interesting submissions ranging across theories, systems,
services, and applications. We invite those managing, operating, developing,
curating, evaluating, or utilizing digital libraries broadly defined, covering
academic or public institutions, including archives, museums, and social
networks. We seek involvement of those in iSchools, as well as working in
computer or information or social sciences and technologies. Multiple tracks
and sessions will ensure tailoring to researchers, practitioners, and diverse
communities including data science/analytics, data curation/stewardship,
information retrieval, human-computer interaction, hypertext (and Web/network
science), multimedia, publishing, preservation, digital humanities, machine
learning/AI, heritage/culture, health/medicine, policy, law, and privacy/
intellectual property.

General Instructions on submissions of full papers, short papers, posters and
demonstrations, doctoral consortium, tutorials, workshops, and panels can be
found at https://2018.jcdl.org/general_instructions. Below are the submission
deadlines:

• Jan. 15, 2018 – Tutorial and workshop proposal submissions
• Jan. 15, 2018 – Full paper and short paper submissions
• Jan. 29, 2018 – Panel, poster and demonstration submissions
• Feb. 1, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for tutorials and workshops
• Mar. 8, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for full papers, short papers,
panels, posters, and demonstrations
• Mar. 25, 2018 – Doctoral Consortium abstract submissions
• Apr. 5, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for Doctoral Consortium
• Apr. 15, 2018 – Final camera-ready deadline for full papers, short papers,
panels, posters, and demonstrations

Please email jcdl2018@googlegroups.com if you have any questions.

Plagiarism 101

prepare your students – avoid plagiarism

DISCOURAGING & DETECTING PLAGIARISM

http://citl.illinois.edu/citl-101/teaching-learning/resources/classroom-environment/discouraging-detecting-plagiarism

concepts of plagiarism,

http://www.wpacouncil.org/node/9

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/05/

Tutorial

intellectual property,

 

copyright,

collaboration, and

fair dealing.

Teach students how to quote, paraphrase, https://youtu.be/MiL4H09v0gU

and cite correctly:

  • Remind students of available resources, such as consulting with the faculty member, TAs, librarians, and the writing center.
  • Exemplify academic integrity in class by citing sources on handouts and during lectures.
  • Inform students that you will randomly check their citations.

Rubrics to help avoid Plagiarism:

http://wehs.westex.libguides.com/content.php?pid=345788&sid=3018138

Free Plagiarism checker:

https://www.paperrater.com/plagiarism_checker

https://www.grammarly.com/plagiarism-checker

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more on plagiarism in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=plagiarism

intellectual property

When:  October 24, 2017    2:00-3:00pm
Where: Adobe Connect meeting:  https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/oercommunityconversations

Who: Karen Pikula, Psychology faculty, Central Lakes College, and Minnesota State OER Faculty Development Coordinator

Special Guest: Gary Hunter System Director for Intellectual Property

Questions?  

Feel free to contact Kimberly Johnson, Director of Faculty and Instructional Development at kimberly.johnson@minnstate.edu or Karen Pikula, Minnesota State OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at karen.pikula@minnstate.edu.

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notes from the webinar

Gary Hunter. copyright. movies, public performance rights, youtube videos. up

the compliance of the terms of service of the web site. Contract law. copyright law. system procedure – copyright clearance, clearing the copyright means using it without violating the copyright law.

clearing copyright:

  • determine if materials are or are not protected
  • use your own original materials
  • perform fair use analysis with fair use checklist to usitify use
  • use in compliance with sections 110 (1) & (2) of copyright act
  • use materials avaialble through an open or CC license
  • get permission (letter, email, subscription, license, etc.)

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html 

8 categories of copyright works

establishing copyright. eligibility requirements;

  • fixation
  • originality
  • minimal creativity

when these three criteria met, copyright arises automatically.

registering a copyright https://www.copyright.gov/ . $35. 70 years for individuals and 95 for corporations or 210 years

not protected by copyright

  • public domain (expired copyright/donated)
  • federal gov publications and web site info
  • works typically registered as a trademark
    • tag lines and slogans
      • just do it – nike 1988
      • got milk – 1993
  • math equations and formulas
  • recipes
  • blank forms
  • phone books

copyright holder exclusive rights

  1. make copies of the work
  2. prepare derivative works
  3. distribute copies
  4. perform the work – performing live (band concert); pre-record audio visual of the same items. DVD play of a movie is considered “performing”
  5. display the work

legality vs reality

legality – activity may be copyright infringement from a legal point of view.

reality – tolerated or ignored by the copyright holder for various reasons

limitations on copyright

  • fair use (#107). librarians use it a lot to copy. using copyright works in F2F teaching, scholarship, research and other non-profit ed purposes.
    1. criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, research

four factors to consider (not educational exception) ; it is a four part test to apply: 1. purpose and character if tge yse 2. nature of the copyirghted work (e.g. factual v creative) 3. amount
http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/docs/Fair_Use_Checklist1.pdf

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

fair use >> . transformation: 1. add / subtract from original 2. use for different purpose; >> parody songs – using enough of music and words to recognize the song, but not enough to it to be copyright infrigement. memes.

students’ use of copyrighted works. students may: use the entire copyrighted work but not publish openly

copyright act #110 (1) applies to F2F teaching.

copyright act #110 (2) applies to Hybrid/Online teaching. exception one digital copy can made and uploaded on D2L. reasonable and limited portions of dramatic musical or audiovisual works

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

personal use v public performance.

if people identifiable ask them to sign a media release form

plagiarism v copyright infringement.

Creative Commons (CC). search engine for content available through cc licenses. https://creativecommons.org/ CC BY – attribution needed; CC BY-SA may remix, tweak CC BY-ND can redistribute, but not alter CC BY-NC for non profit. CC BY-NC-SA

copyright questions

book chapters: one is a rule of thumb
PDF versions of the eassays textbook acceptable, if the students purchased it

music performance licenses: usually cover – educational activities on campus; ed activities at off-campus locations that are outreach

music licenses: BMI, ASCAP, SESAC

#201. Ownership of Copyright. Student ownership http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

MnSCU board policy 3.26 intellectual policy. part 4, subpart A: institutional works; scholarly works; personal works; student works. MnSCU board policy 3.27.1: copyright clearance.

Gary.Hunter@so.mnscu.edu

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=oer