Posts Tagged ‘leadership’

good boss

Good Bosses Remember to Do These 11 Things Every Day

The best bosses become mentors, and take time to teach others.

https://www.inc.com/the-muse/good-bosses-remember-to-do-these-11-things-everyday.html

We asked 11 people to highlight lessons learned from their favorite managers. No matter what kind of boss you have right now, you can apply these valuable pieces of advice in your own career.

1. Own Your Work

“If she told me how to do it, I would rely on her for every assignment, expecting a 1-2-3 step guide. She was training me to be independent, self-motivated, and take pride in my work,” Chocha says.2. Remember the Goal

3. Listen More

4. Ask for What You Want

5. Focus on the Why

6. Keep Things Moving and Delegate

7. Be Curious

8. Always Carry a Notebook

9. Make Yourself Indispensable

10. Build a Solid Network

11. Do Small Tasks Immediately


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more on leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leadership

rural principals

The big jobs of small-town principals

Rural school leaders have some of the most complex roles in education — and some of the highest attrition

by   December 6, 2018

The big jobs of small-town principals

Rural school leaders have some of the most complex, multifaceted jobs in education. They also have some of the highest turnover. Half of all new principals quit their jobs within three years, according to a 2014 study. A national survey released in July found that principals in rural school districts are even less likely than their urban and suburban counterparts to stay at their school the following year and more likely to leave the profession altogether. The schools they preside over, meanwhile, often struggle with persistent povertylow college-going rates and extreme racial disparities in student outcomes.

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more on principals in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=principal

ELI Annual Meeting 2019

ELI Annual Meeting 2019

https://events.educause.edu/eli/annual-meeting/2019/programs-and-tracks

  • What new kinds of leadership are required for this new teaching and learning landscape?
  • What are the best methods and techniques that promote innovation and creative thinking to support student learning?
  • What new educational technologies seem most promising?
  • What role should data and analytics play, and what are the trade-offs between analytics and privacy?
  • How can we best determine the efficacy of our learning innovations and technologies?
  • What learning spaces and environments best promote active learning

2019 ELI Annual Meeting Tracks

  • Accessibility and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
  • Analytics: Privacy, Learning Data, Student Advising, and Interventions
  • Digital and Information Literacy
  • Faculty Development and Engagement
  • Innovation in Instructional Design and Course Models
  • Leadership and Academic Transformation
  • Learning Efficacy: Impact Evaluation, Learning Research and Science
  • Learning Environments and Spaces
  • Learning Horizons: Emerging Technology, Ground-Breaking Practices, and Educational Futures
  • Open Education
  • Student Success

superintendents share surprises about their roles

Lessons in Leadership: 4 superintendents share the biggest surprises about their roles

https://www.educationdive.com/news/lessons-in-leadership-4-superintendents-share-the-biggest-surprises-about/541912/

 Nov. 13, 2018

Navigating politics and learning to let go of past responsibilities were among the most unexpected aspects of their positions

Richard Carranza — Chancellor, New York City Department of Education

I’ve been principal in two different schools in two different states, so my heart’s really in the classroom, in the schools themselves. But it’s important that if anybody’s going to become a superintendent, you realize that you also have a good array of political issues that you’re going to have to deal with, [from] elected officials [and] individuals that are not elected but have considerable political clout and could affect the initiatives or agenda that you have.

Suzanne Lacey — Superintendent, Talladega County Schools

a thing I struggled with the most was just letting go of the jobs that I had done before.

Glenn Robbins — Superintendent, Tabernacle Township School District

“No one ever made a difference by being like everyone else.” An organization is either run by visionaries or operators. Which are you?

Leadership is a privilege. Serve others each day with a positive attitude. How strong are your relationships with not only your board of education and administrative team, but also the teachers association? Relationships and communication are first. Everything else comes second.

Stay true to the district’s goals and values. Remember to embrace the infinite game, and not chase the external finite game. Focus within, not external. Coach, mentor, support and challenge. Be the leader that creates more leaders, not produces more soldiers.

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more on EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edad

micromanagement

Micromanagement make BEST PEOPLE Quit!

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/micromanagement-make-best-people-quit-brigette-hyacinth/

5 Damaging Effects of Micromanagement

micromanaging

1.Decreased Productivity – When a manager is constantly looking over their employees’ shoulders, it can lead to a lot of second-guessing and paranoia, and ultimately leads to dependent employees. Additionally, such managers spends a lot of time giving input and tweaking employee workflows, which can drastically slow down employee response time.

2. Reduced Innovation – When employees feel like their ideas are invalid or live in constant fear of criticism, it’s eventually going to take a toll on creativity. In cultures where risk-taking is punished, employees will not dare to take the initiative. Why think outside the box when your manager is only going to shoot down your ideas and tell you to do it their way?

3. Lower Morale – Employees want the feeling of autonomy. If employees cannot make decisions at all without their managers input, they will feel suffocated. Employees that are constantly made to feel they can’t do anything right may try harder for a while, but will eventually stop trying at all. The effects of this will be evident in falling employee engagement levels.

4. High Staff Turnover – Most people don’t take well to being micromanaged. When talented employees are micromanaged, they often do one thing; quit. No one likes to come to work every day and feel they are walking into a penitentiary with their every movement being monitored. “Please Micromanage Me” Said No Employee ever. I have never seen a happy staff under micromanagement.

5. Loss of Trust – Micromanagement will eventually lead to a massive breakdown of trust. It demotivates and demoralizes employees. Your staff will no longer see you as a manager, but a oppressor whose only job is to make their working experience miserable.

Micromanaging is the opposite of empowerment and it creates toxic work environments. It chokes the growth of the employee and the organization and fosters mediocrity.

If you want performance at scale: Select the right people, provide them with the proper training, tools and support, and then give them room to get the job done!

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more on micromanagement in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=micromanagement

leader charts

What makes a great leader, explained in eight counterintuitive charts

Shane Snow June 5, 2018

https://work.qz.com/1297375/what-makes-a-great-leader-explained-in-eight-counterintuitive-charts/

Flexible Visionaries

Opinionated Adapters

Ego-Free Fighters

Intellectually Humble

Different And United

Supportive Adversaries

Angelic Troublemakers

Skeptical Optimists

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leaders influence people and performance

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more on ed leader in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leader

more on incompetent leader (absentee leader) in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/07/14/incompetent-leader/

leadership vs management

Are you leading or managing? Are you being led or managed? Which do you prefer?
Joe Keshmiri | Mar 20, 2018
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/you-leading-managing-being-led-manged-which-do-prefer-joe-keshmiri

LEADERSHIP IS…

the process of influencing others to understand and agree what needs to be done and how it can be done effectively, and

the process of facilitating individual and collective efforts to accomplish the shared objectives

LEADERS ARE…

People who carry out these processes

or, people in positions of authority in societies/organizations

Yukl 2010

The Difference between Leaders and Managers:

  • Both personalities were thought to produce a different sense of self that would guide conduct and attitudes.
  • Managers are seen as regulators and perpetuators of the existing institutions, identifying with them.
  • Leaders were viewed as individuals who did not depend on membership for identity, working for an organization but never belonging to them.
  • This distinction offered a theoretical basis for understanding why leaders seek opportunities for change

(Mintzberg, and Kotter, et al 1998)

  • Leader seek change and innovation
  • Leaders do not depend on others or institutions for identity
  • Leaders work for the organization but do not belong to them
  • Managers and leaders are different
  • Leaders are active, not reactive, they exert an influence to alter moods, evoke images and expectations
  • Managers are more rational, more detached, more concerned with process and tactics than with substance.

(Zaleznik 1977)

Management – ‘to bring about, to accomplish, to have charge of or responsibility for, to conduct’.

Leadership –’influencing, guiding in direction, course, action, opinion’.

Bennis and Nanus (1985):

Leadership

  • Creates change
  • Works through relationships with people
  • Establishing direction
  • Aligning people
  • Motivating and inspiring

Kotter 1990

Management is:

  • Planning and budgeting
  • Organizing and staffing
  • Controlling and problem solving

Kotter 1990

The real challenge is:

To combine strong leadership and strong management and use each to balance the other

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more on leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leadership

John Craven

The Wisdom of Crowds

http://wisdomofcrowds.blogspot.com/2009/12/introduction-part-v.html

he assembled a team of men with a wide range of knowledge, including mathematicians, submarine specialists, and salvage men. Instead of asking them to consult with each other to come up with an answer, he asked each of them to offer his best guess about how likely each of the scenarios was. To keep things interesting, the guesses were in the form of wagers, with bottles of Chivas Regal as prizes.

Needless to say no one of these pieces of information could tell Craven where the Scorpion was. But Craven believed that if he put all the answers together, building a composite picture of how the Scorpion died, he’d end up with a pretty good idea of where it was.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._Craven

The Mad Genius from the Bottom of the Sea

CARL HOFFMAN DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06.01.05.

The Mad Genius from the Bottom of the Sea

Craven is hard to keep up with. His mind darts from why the Navy should make subs out of glass to the sad end of his long telephone friendship with the late Marlon Brando to the remarkable prodigiousness of his small experimental Hawaiian vineyard.

Craven’s system exploits the dramatic temperature difference between ocean water below 3,000 feet – perpetually just above freezing – and the much warmer water and air above it. That temperature gap can be harnessed to create a nearly unlimited supply of energy. Although the scientific concepts behind cold-water energy have been around for decades, Craven made them real when he founded the state-funded Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii in 1974 on Keahole Point, near Kona.

five signs weak manager

Five Signs You Work For A Weak Manager

being a strong manager doesn’t mean being forceful or domineering
strong managers are strong enough to lead through trust, whereas weak managers have to use the force of their job titles to make people listen to them.
Can’t Ask for Help
Needs a Handy Scapegoat
Can’t Say “I Don’t Know”
Measures Everything
Can’t Say “I’m Sorry”

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more on educational leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educational+leadership

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