Posts Tagged ‘lecture capture’

Loom screencast

Loom – Screencast on Chromebooks, Macs, and PCs

https://www.useloom.com/

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/09/loom-screencast-on-chromebooks-macs-and.html

Loom – Screencast on Chromebooks, Macs, and PCshttp://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/09/loom-screencast-on-chromebooks-macs-and.html

Posted by Free Technology for Teachers on Friday, September 1, 2017

Please share your impressions and comparisons to the MnSCU available MediaSpace (AKA Kaltura):

https://idpstarid.mnscu.edu/idp/Authn/UserPassword

https://scsu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/

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more on lecture capture in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

innovation online ed

Is innovation severely lacking in online education?

Laura Ascione, Managing Editor, Content Services, @eSN_Laura
July 6th, 2017
The emergence of the chief online officer position at many institutions is strong evidence that online education is becoming more mainstream
Revenue generation and tuition

most responding institutions have online program tuition rates that are aligned with standard tuition or that are higher. Those higher tuition rates ranged from 12 percent of private institutions to 29 percent of four-year public institutions, and lower than standard tuition rates ranged from 3 percent of community colleges to 37 percent of private institutions. None of the larger online programs reported tuition rates for online students that are lower than standard tuition rates, and 20 percent reported higher tuition rates for online study.

Course development

Forty percent of chief online officers in larger programs larger programs use instructional design support, and 30 percent use a team approach to online course design. Ten percent outsource course design.

This kind of course development is in stark contrast to practices of chief online officers in mid-sized and smaller programs. Among the smallest online education programs, 18 percent of chief online officers expect faculty to develop online courses independently, and 53 percent treat instructional design support as a faculty option. This means that a combined 71 percent of smaller programs do not mandate the use of instructional design specialists.

In 13 percent of mid-sized programs, faculty are expected to develop courses independently, and in 64 percent of mid-sized programs, they are free to choose whether or not to involve instructional design specialists, yielding a combined 77 percent of programs that do not require the use of instructional design expertise.

Teaching, learning and technology

The CHLOE survey also asked chief online officers to name three technologies or tools they consider most important or innovative for their institution’s fully-online programs. Eighty-one percent first listed an LMS, while others named audio and video conferencing and lecture capture. The technologies most-cited for second- and third-most important were conferencing, video and lecture capture software. (see Plamen’s effort to start faculty discussion on lecture capture here: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/coursecapture/)

“There was no sign of much-hyped innovations like adaptive learning, competency-based education LMS solutions, or simulation or game-based learning tools,” according to the study. “Such tools may be in use for specific courses or programs but based on responses to CHLOE, these have yet to achieve institution-wide adoption at any scale.” (see Plamen’s efforts start a discussion on game-based learning here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=game-based+learning

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more on online ed in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

lecture capture on shoestring

8 Tips for Lecture Capture on a Shoestring

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/17/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/17/8-tips-for-lecture-capture-on-a-shoestring.aspx

Whether you’re flipping your courses, creating videos to help your students understand specific concepts or recording lectures for exam review, these tips can help you optimize your production setup on a tight budget.

1) Speak Into the Microphone

2) Reconsider Whether You Want to be a Talking Head

3) Keep Your Recording Device Steady

4) Avoid Using the Camera Built Into Your Laptop

5) Explore a Range of Recording Software
Screencast-O-Matic
TechSmith Camtasia
Adobe Captivate
Adobe Presenter

“online video platforms,”

TechSmith Relay, Panopto, Tegrity and Kaltura

6) Forget About Editing Your Videos

7) Remember Accessibility

Record your video and upload it to YouTube. YouTube will apply its machine transcription to the audio as a starting point. Then you can download the captions into your caption editor and improve on the captions from there. Afterward, you can delete the video from YouTube and add it to your institution’s platform.

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lecture capture in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

apps for tutorials

Tools and Apps for Creating Educational Tutorials

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2016/04/a-handy-chart-featuring-some-of-best.html

Categories
Apps
iPad apps for creating tutorials
Android apps for creating tutorials
Chrome apps for creating tutorials and screencasts
Web apps for creating tutorials and screencasts

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more on lecture capture in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=capture

first SCSU lecture capture meeting

Dear Colleagues,

Do you use lecture capture in your courses? If you do, please join us in one-hour information session.
Lecture/course capture may have different formats and dimensions, from a simple recording of the lecture, to elaborate interactive use of hardware and software.

We created a dedicated blog for the methods and technology of lecture capture:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/coursecapture

Please use the hyperlink and feel welcome to share with us your thoughts before, during and after the session, scheduled for

Thursday,  October 6, 2016, 3:00PM in MC 205.

We welcome your materials, suggestions and questions!

MC 205 is the Professional Development Room on the second floor of the Miller Center (http://www.stcloudstate.edu/campusmap/default.aspx).
To find MC 205, please use this virtual tour. Open in Google Chrome browser the following link: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/vr_library/virtual_guide.mov. File will download and you can open it in QuickTime application.

If you need assistance to find us, please let us know.

For any other information, please do not hesitate to contact us:

Kannan Sivaprakasam,  ksivaprakasam@stcloudstate.edu
Plamen Miltenoff: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Looking forward to working together…

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more on lecture capture in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

Deploying Lecture Capture

7 Best Practices for Deploying Lecture Capture Campuswide

Technology leaders from universities with large lecture capture implementations share their advice for rolling out the technology at scale.

By Leila Meyer 08/03/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/08/03/7-best-practices-for-deploying-lecture-capture-campuswide.aspx

1) Automate the Recording Process to Make It Effortless

The Department of Instructional Technology

Echo360 lecture capture appliances and some Sonic Foundry Mediasite appliances. While lecture capture appliances are “not cheap,” according to Lucas, they reduce the complexity for faculty and staff.

Sonic Foundry Mediasite appliances with CollegeNET 25Live scheduling software to automate the lecture capture process.

2) Focus on Implementation in Large-Capacity Classrooms

installing lecture capture appliances and high-definition cameras in the large lecture halls at UMass Lowell has helped reduce DFWs (drop, fail, withdrawal rate) in high-enrollment classes such as Calculus 1.

3) Establish Relationships with Leadership and Early Adopters

4) Ensure High-Quality Audio Recording

“You might be able to get by if you don’t see the instructor, of if they step outside the viewing angle of the camera, but if you can’t hear them, the capture is wasted. It’s critical that they pay attention to audio.”

5) Offer Flexibility for Instructors to Record Lectures Anywhere/Anytime

6) Ensure Adequate Storage and Processing on Servers

7) Engage with Other Colleges and Universities

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more on lecture capture in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

download from MediaSpace

How to download videocapture from MediaSpace (AKA Kaltura)

screen recording

screen recording

  • Open the file you want to download in the player, by clicking on the file
  • Click on the scroll down menu “Actions” and and choose “Edit”
actions_edit

actions_edit

  • Click on the scroll down menu “Actions” and and choose “Edit”
  • Click “Downloads”
downloads

downloads

  • 1. Select HiDef MP4 file, 2. Click “download” and 3. click on “Download Media”
save

save

  •  save your file to a location of your choice

video tools for social media

14 Video Tools for Social Media

use to create screencasts, montages and slideshows.

December 7, 2015

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/14-video-tools-for-social-media-marketers

Facebook gives priority to native videos (as opposed to video links to external sources) to encourage this type of content. Videos that are directly uploaded to Facebook perform better and provide a better experience. They receive 30% more video views than videos posted from other websites, and have images up to 11 times larger in the news feed.

Screencasts / Lecture Capture

  • Camtasia Studio
  • ScreenFlow (Apple/Mac)
  • Snagit
  • TechSmith Fuse works with Camtasia Studio and Snagit. Capture the images and videos on your mobile device and send them to your desktop to use in your videos.
  • Reflector by Squirrels allows you to do wireless mirroring, so you can display your smartphone screen (Android or iOS) on your desktop.

Slideshows

Video Montages on Desktop and Mobile Apps

  • Animoto
  • Magisto is a free app that automatically turns your everyday videos and photos into movies
  • Adobe Voice. The app is available only for iPad

Mobile video capture

  • Flipagram. You can record voice narration, choose from Flipagram’s music or upload 15 seconds of music you already have on your mobile device.
  • Diptic app is another video tool for making collages that has a newly added animation feature, which works with transitions
  • Boomerang is a new app from Instagram that takes a burst of photographs and stitches them together into a 1-second video and loops it forward and backward. It’s not an animated GIF, but it’s designed to look like one.

More about lecture capture in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=capture&submit=Search
More about video in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=video&submit=Search
More about effective presentations and slideshows in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=presentations&submit=Search

 

 

 

 

lecture capture and online ed

From the Blended and Online Learning discussion list:

We’re working on a grant program at my unit to improve these lec-capture courses. One of the ways is to train faculty:

  •  We’ve seen that these courses have very little student engagement, especially for online students for whom this is the main medium of instruction. It’s challenging for the instructors to keep the online student in mind as they teach their lec-capture class. This is not surprising, since they’re essentially being asked to teach 2 different audiences simultaneously  – in class and online. However, given that this is not going to change in the near future for us, we’ve begun exploring ways to train faculty to do a better job given the constraints. Below are some ideas:
    • We are in the process of creating a sort of “checklist” to address things that can be done before, during, and after the class and ways of streamlining the process.
    • BEFORE
      • Make faculty familiar with the technology – do tours of rooms, tutorials, short workshops, etc.
      • Syllabus, Schedule and instructional materials are prepared before the semester begins.
      • Learning objectives, outcomes, and assessments are aligned and made transparent to the students.
      • Design pedagogy that is inclusive – for e.g., move discussions online, create groups that include in-class and online students, use language that directly addresses online students, etc.
    • DURING & at the END
      • Review a sampling of videos at the beginning, middle, and end by ourselves and then with the faculty and provide them feedback on the good, the bad, and the ugly – very discreetly. 🙂 It’s going to be a sort of a joint reflection on the class. We believe if we do this a few times with the faculty, they’ll get the message and will make greater effort to include the online student in their instruction. And doing it 3 times will also make visible the changes and progress they make (or not)
      • We also plan to survey the students at the beginning, middle, and at the end of the semester and share the results with the faculty.

Chunking of videos includes preplanning and post production tasks. Faculty can be trained to script their lectures more, create lecture based on “topics” to make chunking and tagging easier. Need to focus on end user experience (online student).

These are some of the ideas. We plan to start implementing them this summer. I’ll share with you our progress. 🙂

Rema

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Rema Nilakanta, Ph.D.
Director of Design & Delivery|
Engineering-LAS Online Learning
1328 Howe Hall
515-294-9259 (office)
515-294-6184 (fax)
http://www.elo.iastate.edu

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On Wed, Jan 27, 2016 at 8:48 AM, Nilakanta, Rema [ELO] <rema@iastate.edu> wrote:

Good Morning!

Thank you all for filling out the survey on the use of lecture capture in higher education. I appreciate your time and interest in this subject.

Attached are the results. I’ve also provided an overview below. The main purpose of this survey was to get an overall idea of how lecture capture is used in HE. I was just curious to see if the way we use it is pretty much similar at other institutions. The finding was inconclusive. My next step is to dig a little deeper – perhaps repurpose this survey for faculty and students. The final goal is to improve these courses – make them as pedagogically sound as possible, given that this technology is here to stay at our campus, at least for the near future. It will certainly require designing faculty training, but I would also like to explore innovative and efficient ways of chunking lecture videos pre and post production.

Let me know if you have any questions or need further information.

Rema

OVERVIEW OF “USE OF LECTURE CAPTURE IN HE” SURVEY RESULTS & FINDINGS

By Rema Nilakanta

rema@iastate.edu

I’ve listed some of the findings that impressed me. They do not follow the order of the questions in the survey. For details, please view the attached report.

Just a quick note – There were 39 respondents, but not all responded to every question. The respondents included instructional and IT support staff and administrators at all levels generally from 4-year public and private universities.

FINDINGS & THEMES

  • Echo 365 and Panopto are the most frequently used lecture capture systems, but Adobe Connect also has several users.
  • The computer screen and the instructor feed are most commonly captured (89% and 79%, respectively). However, some also capture the document camera, the whiteboard, and the graphics pen tablet (53%, 39%, and 32%, respectively).
  • Almost every one (97%) report that they support their recordings with additional course materials in an LMS, while many also use web conferencing to deliver lectures and hold office hours. A sizeable portion of respondents also use online textbooks and publisher sites in their course delivery. Only 18% use lecture capture as the primary means of course delivery.
  • The majority of respondents use full class recordings of an hour or more, while around half also use short segments of 20 minutes or less.
  • The majority of the respondents seem to indicate a campus wide use of lecture capture for different purposes:

o   review of in-class lectures

o   training and advising

o   student presentations (students use the technology to create their presentations/demos/assignments)

o   live streaming of seminars and on-site hosting of conferences for remote students and audiences.

  • Size of the support units ranged from 1 person to 150+ people spread across campus.
  • Similarly, there was a wide range for the number of courses that used lecture capture – as few as 1-2 to a 1000 and more, if one takes into account non-traditional uses.
  • Although the numbers show that a majority (77%) provide full IT support for their lecture capture systems, a closer look at the comments indicates there is a general tendency toward making faculty more self reliant by providing them support when requested, or providing them with fully equipped and automated rooms, personal capture solutions and/or training.
  • Majority seemed satisfied with the lecture capture setup, so did the students.  However, it seemed that the knowledge about student satisfaction was more anecdotal than formal. Other observations include:

o   For people satisfied with the setup, there were quite a few users of Echo 360 and Panopto.

o   Panopto seemed to rise above the rest for its promptness and quality of service. Mediasite got mixed response.

o   There seems to be an awareness of the need to get the lectures captioned.

o   Along with automated lecture capture technology, there seems to be a rise in old ways of doing things – manual (human) recording of events continues and seems preferable, especially in the face of rising costs of lecture capture technology.

  • The top 5 challenges concerning faculty support can be summarized as follows:

o   Training faculty to use the technology – turn on the mic, no recording of white board, do not change settings, take time to learn the technology.

o   Funding and support

o   Ensuring best practices

o   Captioning

o   IP concerns

  • Efforts to address these challenges were related to:

OPERATIONS

–       Keep mic on all the time

–       Use of media asset management systems, like Kaltura (MediaSite)

–       Admins trained to check settings for rooms

–       Disable download of recordings as default setting (addressed IP concerns)

TRAINING

–       Create user groups around technologies

–       Promote communication among instructors using a particular room

–       Training of faculty by instructional design teams on the use of technology and best practices

 

here is more on lecture capture in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=lecture+capture&submit=Search

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