MOOC and Libraries

MOOC and Libraries

http://explore.tandfonline.com/content/bes/moocsandlibraries

New ACRL Discussion Group—Library Support for MOOCs

Libraries in the Time of MOOCs

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/libraries-time-moocs
issues related to MOOCs, such as intellectual property rights, privacy issues, and state regulations.
MOOCs have arrived on the scene at a time when many institutions of higher learning are in extreme financial crisis
OCLC conference, “MOOCs and Libraries: Massive Opportunity or Overwhelming Challenge? http://www.oclc.org/research/events/2013/03-18.html
The MOOC movement might change this copyright-ownership contract between university and faculty.

Stephens, M. m., & Jones, K. L. (2014). MOOCs as LIS Professional Development Platforms: Evaluating and Refining SJSU’s First Not-for-Credit MOOC. Journal Of Education For Library & Information Science, 55(4), 345-361.
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xMOOCs. Using central­ized learning platforms (e.g., Coursera),they emphasize individual learning usingautomated assessment tools.In contrast, cMOOCs stress the relation­ship between course content and a com­munity of learners. Social learning, in thecase of cMOOCs, is emphasized  through uses of distributed tools (e.g., a combina­tion of a course site, student blogs, andsocial  etworking sites) to build networks of knowledge and learners. Unlike their xMOOC counterparts, the role of an in­ istructor in a cMOOC is to be a “guide on the side,” a facilitator of the knowledge­ making process who uses connectivist learning theory (Siemens, 2004; Siemens,2012)

Learning 2.0 programs, also known as“23 Things,” have offered online technol­ogy-focused  professional development for library staff and could be considered an early version of LIS-focused MOOCs (Stephens, 2013a). Utilizing concepts such as self-directed learning, play, and an emphasis on lifelong learning, these pro­grams have been offered for individual li­braries as well as consortial  and state level iterations to reach thousands of library staff.
The course structure of the MOOCversion of the HL incorporated content updated from the SLIS course by the co­instructors. Ten modules were scheduled over a twelve-week “semester.” Students
could earn a certificate of completion, if they finished three of five artifact-based assignments of their choosing, in addition to blogging and participating in an end-of-course virtual symposium. The weekly schedule is available in Appendix A, and assignment descriptions are available in Appendix B
utilizing concepts such as self-directed learning, play, and an emphasis on lifelong learning, these pro­grams have been offered for individual li­braries as well as consortial and state level iterations to reach thousands of library staff. Benefits to staff include increased comfort with emerging technologies and an increased desire to continue learning (p. 348).