Posts Tagged ‘library counter’

in house made library counters

LITA listserv exchange on “Raspberry PI Counter for Library Users”

On 7/10/20, 10:05 AM, “lita-l-request@lists.ala.org on behalf of Hammer, Erich F” <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org on behalf of erich@albany.edu> wrote:

Jason,

I think that is a very interesting project.  If I understand how it works (comparing reference images to live images), it should still work if a “fuzzy” or translucent filter were placed on the lens as a privacy measure, correct? You could even make the fuzzy video publicly accessible to prove to folks that privacy is protected.

If that’s the case, IMHO, it really is a commercially viable idea and it would have a market far beyond libraries.  Open source code and hardware designs and sales of pre-packaged hardware and support.  Time for some crowdsource funding!  🙂

Erich

On Friday, July 10, 2020 at 10:14, Jason Griffey eloquently inscribed:
I ran a multi-year project to do counting (as well as attention measurement)
called Measure the Future (http://.measurethefuture.net). That project is i
desperate need of updating….there has been some work done on it at the
> University of OK libraries, but we haven’t seen their code push et. As the
> code stands on GitHub, it isn’t usable….the installation is broken based on
> some underlying dependencies.  The Univ of OK code fixes the issue, but it
> hasn’t been pushed yet. But if you want to see the general code and way we
> approached it, that is all available.  > Jason
> On Jul 8, 2020, 1:37 PM -0500, Mitchell, James Ray
> <jmitchell20@una.edu>, wrote:
>         Hi Kun,
>         I don’t know if this will be useful to you or not, but Code4Lib journal
> had an article a couple years ago that might be helpful. It’s called
> “Testing Three Type of Raspberry Pi People Counters.” The link to the
> article is https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fjournal.code4lib.org%2Farticles%2F12947&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7C8d2342df6f3d4d83766508d824e29f23%7C5011c7c60ab446ab9ef4fae74a921a7f%7C0%7C1%7C637299903041974052&amp;sdata=f9qeftEvktqHakDqWY%2BxHTj3kei7idOFAJnROp%2FiOCU%3D&amp;reserved=0
>         Regards    >         James

My note:
In 2018, following the university president’s call for ANY possible savings, the library administrator was send a proposal requesting information regarding the license for the current library counters and proposing the save the money for the license by creating an in-house Arduino counter. The blueprints for such counter were share (as per another LITA listserv exchange). SCSU Physics professor agreement to lead the project was secured as well as the opportunity for SCSU Physics students to develop the project as part of their individual study plan. The proposal was never addressed neither by the middle nor the upper management.

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more on raspberry pi in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=raspberry

more on arduino in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=arduino

IoT and libraries

The Internet of Things (IoT) and Libraries

The Internet of Things (IoT) and Libraries

breakdown of IoT functionality, from Deloitte. They give 5 general types of services that IoT “things” can do:

  1. Internal state: Heartbeat- and ping-like broadcasts of health, potentially including diagnostics and additional status reporting (for example, battery level, CPU/memory utilization, strength of network signal, up-time or software/platform version).
  2. Location: Communication of physical location via GPS, GSM, triangulation or proximity techniques
  3. Physical attributes: Monitoring the world surrounding the device, including altitude, orientation, temperature, humidity, radiation, air quality, noise and vibration
  4. Functional attributes: Higher-level intelligence rooted in the device’s purpose for describing business process or workload attributes
  5. Actuation services: Ability to remotely trigger, change or stop physical properties or actions on the device.

Examples of IoT in action

There are some pretty well-known IoT products that some of you already use, including:

  • Nest Thermostat (and others). These allow you to control your AC from your phone, anywhere that you can connect to the Internet.
  • Smart lights: Same concept, but for lights. You can turn lights on/off from your phone. Phillips Hue is an example of this
  • Bluetooth Trackers – Tile (https://www.thetileapp.com/) is an example of a Bluetooth Tracker. Put one on that thing you always lose (i.e., car keys). The next time you lose those keys, you can find them again via an app on your phone.
  • Smart Home appliances – things like Google Home, Amazon Echo, and Apple HomeKit.
  • Smart power switches – Belkin’s Wemo Insight Wi-Fi Smart Plug is an example. They let you turn the plug (and therefore anything connected to it) on and off, set schedules for the plug, monitor energy consumption and use, etc. You can also connect it to Amazon Alexa and Google Home for hands-free voice control
  • Health and exercise trackers – Fitbits “fit” into this category, too.

How does IoT affect libraries?

Here are some ways libraries are already incorporating IoT technology into their libraries:

  • Smart Building Technology: As libraries retrofit their buildings with newer technology (or build new buildings/branches), they are starting to see more IoT-based technology. For example, some libraries can can adjust heating, cooling and lights from a smartphone app. Some newer building monitoring and security systems can be monitored via mobile apps.
  • RFID: RFID technology (sensors in books) is a type of IoT technology, and has been around for awhile.
  • Beacon Technology: There are at least two library-focused companies experimenting with Beacon technology (Capira Technologies and Bluubeam).
  • People counters: Check out Jason Griffey’s Measure the Future project. Here’s what he says about Measure the Future: “Imagine having a Google-Analytics-style dashboard for your library building: number of visits, what patrons browsed, what parts of the library were busy during which parts of the day, and more. Measure the Future is working to make that happen by using open-hardware based sensors that can collect data about building usage that is now invisible. Making these invisible occurrences explicit will allow librarians to make strategic decisions that create more efficient and effective experiences for their patrons.”
  • Library classes! Libraries are also teaching classes about the Internet of Things. These include classes focused on introducing patrons to IoT technology, and classes that focus on an aspect of IoT, like a class on making things with Arduinos or how to use your new Fitbit.

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more on IoT in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=internet+of+things

proposal for Arduino library counter: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/18/service-based-learning-library-counter/