Posts Tagged ‘library’

vodcasting for the library

My note:
I pushed this idea four years ago (e.g. https://youtu.be/4vw0iID0huE) for the SCSU library and it was shut down

Rocking the Small Screen without Losing Your Mind

http://www.davidleeking.com/rocking-the-small-screen-without-losing-your-mind

Rocking the Small Screen without Losing your Mind from David King

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More on videos in the library in this IMS blog

tablets library

Bornett, C. C. (2016). Leseförderung digital genial: WieTablets die Bibliothekspädagogik verändern / Tipps nicht nur für Bilderbuch-Apps. (German). Bub: Forum Bibliothek Und Information, 68(10), 606-608.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d118913547%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite 

Šorgo, A., Bartol, T., Dolničar, D., & Podgornik, B. B. (2017). Attributes of digital natives as predictors of information literacy in higher education. British Journal Of Educational Technology, 48(3), 749-767. doi:10.1111/bjet.12451   http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d122273174%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite
(PDF available through ILL)
Biology, IT faculty Maribor, Slovenia. None of them is a librarian

Correlation and regression analysis based on survey data revealed that the attributes of digital natives are poor predictors of IL. information and communication technologies (ICT) experiences expressed as the sum of the use of different applications do not necessarily contribute to IL; some applications have a positive and some a negative effect; personal ownership of smartphones, portable computers and desktop computers has no direct effect on IL, while ownership of a tablet computer is actually a negative predictor; personal ownership of ICT devices has an impact on ICT experiences and Internet confidence, and, therefore, an indirect impact on IL; and ICT-rich university courses (if not designed to cultivate IL) have only a marginal impact on IL, although they may have some impact on ICT experiences and Internet confidence. The overall conclusion is that digital natives are not necessarily information literate, and that IL should be promoted with hands-on and minds-on courses based on IL standards.

Sharman, A. (2014). Roving Librarian: The Suitability of Tablets in Providing Personalized Help Outside of the Traditional Library. New Review Of Academic Librarianship, 20(2), 185-203. doi:10.1080/13614533.2014.914959

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d96764510%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

McRae, L. l. (2015). TEACHING IN AN AGE OF UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: A DECELERATED CURRICULUM. Digital Culture & Education, 7131-145.
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more on mobile devices in the library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+devices+library

assessment library

NISO Virtual Conference:

Justifying the Library: Using Assessment to Justify Library Investments

April 20, 11:00am – 5:00pm EST – Learn more and register at: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2016/virtual_conference/apr20_virtualconf/

Assessment exercises for institutional libraries are frequently a double-edged sword; they’re as readily used to justify cuts as they are to bolster budgets. This NISO virtual conference provides expert insights into how data gathered in the normal course of activities can be leveraged to demonstrate value to the parent institution. Data represent the raw material for building your case. What data are available? How is their quality? What is the appropriate context for persuasively presenting that data to deans, provosts and other administrators? This virtual conference will address the very hot topic of library assessment in the context of a changing educational environment and features a complete roster of expert speakers, including:

  • Steven J. Bell, Associate University Librarian, Temple University
  • Nancy Turner, Assessment and Organizational Performance Librarian, Temple University
  • Jocelyn Wilk, University Archivist, Columbia University
  •    Elisabeth Brown, Director of Assessment & Scholarly Communications Librarian, SUNY-Binghamton
  • Ken Varnum, Senior Program Manager for Discovery, Delivery, & Learning Analytics, University of Michigan
  • Jan Fransen, Service Lead for Researcher and Discovery Systems, University of Minnesota
  •    Kristi Holmes, Directer, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University
  •    Starr Hoffman, Head, Planning & Assessment, University of Nevada – Las Vegas
  • Carl Grant, Chief Technology Officer and Associate University Librarian for Knowledge Services, University of Oklahoma

The preliminary agenda and pricing information for this event may be found at:

http://www.niso.org/news/events/2016/virtual_conference/apr20_virtualconf/

As a bonus, register for the virtual conference and receive an automatic registration for the follow-up training webinar, Making Assessment Work: Using ORCIDS to Improve Your Institutional Assessments, on Thursday, April 28!

http://www.niso.org/news/events/2016/training_thursday/apr28_tt/

Instructors for that session are Alice Meadows (ORCID), Christopher Erdmann (Harvard University) and Merle Rosenzweig (University of Michigan).

For more information about this event, please contact Jill O’Neill (joneill@niso.org).

Other questions for NISO? Get in touch at:

NISO

3600 Clipper Mill Road

Suite 302

Baltimore, MD 21211-1948

Phone: +1.301.654.2512

Email: nisohq@niso.org

More on assessment in this IMS blog:

analytics in education

Academy of distinguished teachers

Academy of distinguished teachers, Innovation

University of Minnesota, McNamara Alumni Center – Twin Cities Campus. April 8, 2015

Full program available here: https://guidebook.com/g/adt/


Randy Bass

Randy Bass

Randy Bass
https://www.linkedin.com/pub/randall-bass/14/94/77

flipping disruption into Design

there are two type of universities: the ones that are in control of change and the ones, which are pressed to change.

what kind of education is needed at this moment of history.
Assumptions: 5-10 years will be for a first time outcompeted in terms of delivering information and degrees. What is that the university can do distinctively well that WWW cannot do: mentored learning and the arc of learning (beyond collection of granular separate learning)

book: The New Division of Labor. http://www.amazon.com/The-New-Division-Labor-Computers/dp/0691124027
External forces of potential disruption: 1. MOOCs, nearly free education, 2. skilled-based learning (Codeacademy, Udacity), 3. data analytic 4. public pressure on access, metrics of impact.

Gartner group (http://www.gartner.com/technology/home.jsp) hype cycle : overvalued in a short term and undervalued in a long term. MOOC is excellent example.
NMC: competing models of education.

learning analytics. adaptive learning, intelligent tutoring etc. Open Learning Initative. http://oli.cmu.edu/

In the 19th century, railroads companies which were in the business of railroad companies went under; the ones which were in the business of transportation survived. Parallel, universities, which are in the business of delivering information will die out; the ones, which will survive must look to a very different picture.

formative wider outcomes

formative wider outcomes

integration and dis-integration

integration and dis-integration

the white light

high impact integrative curriculum

high impact integrative curriculum

what makes high inpact practices high impact

what makes high inpact practices high impact

formal versus informal

formal versus informal

integrative versus disintegrative


Selected sessions:

 

The Value of Assessing Outcomes of Teaching Methodologies to guide instructional design

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10594685/


game-based learning:

Upping your Game – Best Practices in Using Game-Based Learning

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10594684/

Implementing Game Dynamics in Moodle

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10693434/

visuals:

Engaging Students through Video Integration

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676389/

Innovative Options for Recording Your Own Course Videos

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676375/

Using Flipgrid Video Commentary to Share Student Learning

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676361/

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Enhancing learning with online narrated presentations using VoiceThread

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676372/

flipped:

Essential Technology & Tools for Flipping Your Classroom

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676385/

Improving Delivery of Technical Course Content through Incremental Use of Classroom “Flipping”

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676376/

Flipping our classrooms: Faculty from UMD’s Flipped Classroom Community of Practice sharing their experiences.

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10594850/

The Pros and Cons of Flipping the Classroom

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676323/


Using Google Forms for Student Group Evaluations

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10734863/


Library:

The University Libraries Partnership for Affordable Content – Enhance Student Learning and Save Them Money!

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676358/


CRS Tophat:

Using Classroom Debates as an Interactive Learning Tool in a Course on Companion Animal Ethical Issues

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10676369/


 

online:

Adapting the Harvard Case Method for Online Courses

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10595018/

Readiness Assessment for Online Courses

https://guidebook.com/guide/33541/event/10595040/

 

technology showcase

technology showcase general view

5 4 3 2 1

ALA Gamification

ALA’s GameRT is looking to organize preconferences at next year’s Midwinter and Annual ALA conferences. Last year at Annual we had Dr. Scott Nicholson run a preconference called Using Meaningful Gamification to Motivate Library Users. It was a great success and people enjoyed it a lot!

What we’re interested in hearing from you is what sorts of topics you’d like to see covered at a preconference. Once we get those ideas we’ll be able to find people capable of creating preconferences that you’ll find interesting and educational! So please, let us know any ideas that you have!

Please reply with your ideas offlist by emailing me at thematthewmurray@gmail.com

Apologies if this is too off topic, but I thought some of you might be able to provide some good suggestions.

-Matthew

3d printing libraries

From: Almond, Emily [mailto:ealmond@georgialibraries.org]
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 6:28 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: Re: 3D printing in libraries

Hi guys, we have 21 3D printers in public libraries in GA and we created this resource page to help our libs decide what works for them: http://galibtech.org/?page_id=1052

Also, our system administrator Daniel Zeiger, had these thoughts:

UP mini if you want something cheap and plug and play. ~$600 dollars and doesn’t need much maintenance but its build plate is fairly small (this can be a good thing if you don’t want prints that can run all night).

For a little more you can grab the UP plus 2/Afinia H480 which gives you a larger build plate and allows you to see the print from any angle while printing. The plus 2 also self levels which takes a huge step out of the printing process.

If you want something that requires a bit more maintenance but also gives you much more control over your printer and settings (and a larger build plate) I would go for the FlashForge Creator Pro or the Ultimaker 2. Both of these offer superior print quality and control, but require more tinkering and knowledge to print successfully.

Emily Almond

Director, IT

Georgia Public Library Service
On Feb 6, 2015, at 12:09 PM, Amy Jiang <ajiang@laverne.edu> wrote:

Ajiang@laverne.edu
 
On Feb 6, 2015, at 8:21 AM, cherie bronkar <cheriebr35@yahoo via <dmarc_fix@lists.ala.org> wrote:

cbronkar@kent.edu

Cherie

On Friday, February 6, 2015 11:12 AM, Janet Ann Crum <Janet.Crum@nau.edu> wrote:

Great idea! I’d be happy to help with that.

 

Janet

Sent from my iPhone
On Feb 6, 2015, at 9:05 AM, Cindi Blyberg <cindiann@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey all!

Is there interest in forming a LITA Interest Group around 3D printing or Makerspaces?

More information about IGs can be found here:

http://www.ala.org/lita/about/manual/litamanualsection6

and the petition to form one is here:

http://www.ala.org/lita/sites/ala.org.lita/files/content/about/manual/forms/E5-IGpetition%20renewa.pdf

Other groups have collected signatures via Google doc, but some have been formed during the middle of a conference.

Have fun! 🙂

On Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 6:30 PM, Matt Beckstrom <MBeckstrom@lclibrary.org> wrote:

I may not be able to recommend any particular 3D printer model, but I can recommend a service that we use that makes offering 3D printers to my patrons really easy.  We use an online system called Skyforge from a company called Element Robot (https://skyforge.co/home/).  This system facilitates the uploading of 3d plans, the payment of them, and printing them to the printer.  It really is a time saver for me and my staff.

If you have any questions, please let me know.

 

Matt Beckstrom
mbeckstrom@lclibrary.org

Systems Librarian
Lewis & Clark Library
120 S Last Chance Gulch
Helena, MT  59601

http://www.lclibrary.org
(406)  447-1690 x111

>>> John Fitzgibbon <jfitzgibbon@Galwaylibrary.ie> 2/5/2015 3:55 AM >>>

Hi,

We are interested in providing access to 3D printers in our largest library. Our hope is to make the printer available to children between the ages of ten and fifteen so that they would gain experience in designing and creating three dimensional artifacts.

I am not sure if there is a 3D printer that is that user friendly.  Is it feasible to provide this service to this target audience? What is the best 3D printer to use?

I would appreciate any advice.

Regards

John

John Fitzgibbon

Executive Librarian

 

w: http://www.galwaylibrary.ie

 

 

 

 

 

Previous IMS posts on 3d printing:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=3d+printing