Posts Tagged ‘microcredentialing’

Shark Tank grant badge comparison

According to the this Colorado Community College System comprehensive white paper: https://www.cccs.edu/wp-content/uploads/documents/CCCS-Digital-Badging-Taskforce-Whitepaper-11.12.14.pdf

Acclaim, Badger, Badge List, Credly, CSULogics, and Red Critter

Acclaim and Credly merged. CSULogics seems CCCS native; pls advise if I need to contact them nevertheless. Badgr is now with Canvas, but I still think we need to explore the options with other LMS, such as D2L.

Meeting with Pete from Credly: https://zoom.us/recording/share/gh-NPaJf-3No3mRE6lj_Ulq7qFfRjW0GRjUb27YRsX6wIumekTziMw

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https://badgr.com/

contacted April 25, 2019.

From: Hank from Badge List <hank.holiday@badge-list.intercom-mail.com>
Reply-To: Hank from Badge List <hank.holiday@badge-list.intercom-mail.com>
Date: Friday, April 26, 2019 at 4:53 PM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Discuss a setup of microcredentialing system

Hi Plamen! The pricing is is available here: https://www.badgelist.com/pricing

Please look that over and we can help you via email if you have any questions.

Cheers,
– Hank

From: Ben from Badge List <ben.roome@badge-list.intercom-mail.com>
Reply-To: Ben from Badge List <ben.roome@badge-list.intercom-mail.com>
Date: Monday, April 29, 2019 at 5:30 PM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Discuss a setup of microcredentialing system

Hi Plamen,
We’d love to get on a call but unfortunately we can’t spend those time resources on accounts that generate below $4,950 per year. Does your budget meet those requirements? If so we’d be happy to schedule a conversation.

Benfrom Badge List

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https://www.badgelist.com/

email sent March 26.

respond on March 29: https://www.badgelist.com/pricing

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https://www.redcritterteacher.com/

email sent March 26. submission #28545

Zoom meeting https://zoom.us/j/7796063558 with Dan Hoffman on March 26, Tues, 3PM

Zoom meeting recording https://zoom.us/recording/share/gmCYai1IkMUFH3r2x-yxGciY977Beok5fgay5Czja_CwIumekTziMw with Dan Hoffman of April 30, 2019

http://redcritterconnecter.com/pricing

http://redcritterconnecter.com/APIReference.aspx  to make easy integrate. http://redcritterconnecter.com/APIReference.aspx?apiid=14

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Suitable

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https://support.suitable.co/hc/en-us

https://support.suitable.co/hc/en-us/articles/115000780372-Achievements-Badges-

mostly working with undergrads.

the emphasis (strong side) is the streamlining of the different offices and activities on campus

levels of proficiency is very much geared toward undergrads

aspects of gamification, but no peer support credit/badge

U of Pittsburgh – OCC outside the class curriculum
Monclair U (NJ second largest):
U of Wyoming: after level 3, career coach does storytelling appointment.

pilot is $5K and institutional can vary between $10-15K

segmenting capabilities.

eportfolio as a process

4 things you should know about digital portfolios

BY MATT RENWICK December 6th, 2018
https://www.eschoolnews.com/2018/12/06/4-things-you-should-know-about-digital-portfolios/
1. Portfolio assessment is not new to education.
Digital portfolios came into prominence in the 1990s, around the time when computers became commonplace in classrooms. David Niguidula, a pioneer in this alternative form of assessment, coined the term “digital student portfolios.” He defines them as “an online collection of student work for a particular purpose and audience.” Digital portfolios cut the distance between student thinking and evidence of learning. There is no longer a need to represent understanding through a score or a grade.

2. . The best digital portfolios are process oriented.
A myth in education is that we should only showcase student’s best artifacts of learning. We might think of an artist’s body of work when considering digital portfolios as an alternative assessment.

3. It’s not a digital portfolio unless students are in charge.

4. Digital student portfolios are about more than just assessment.
The best digital portfolio processes do more than serve as an evaluation tool. They help the student develop a stronger sense of themselves as a learner and see their growth over time, such as through a series of drafts posted toward a final project and presentation.

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more on eportoflio in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=eportfolio

personalized learning in the digital age

If This Is the End of Average, What Comes Next?

By Daniel T. Willingham     Jun 11, 2018

Todd Rose, the director of the Mind, Brain, and Education program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, has emerged as a central intellectual figure behind the movement. In particular, his 2016 book, “The End of Average,” is seen as an important justification for and guide to the personalization of learning.

what Rose argues against. He holds that our culture is obsessed with measuring and finding averages—averages of human ability and averages of the human body. Sometimes the average is held to be the ideal.

The jaggedness principle means that many of the attributes we care about are multi-faceted, not of a whole. For example, human ability is not one thing, so it doesn’t make sense to talk about someone as “smart” or “dumb.” That’s unidimensional. Someone might be very good with numbers, very bad with words, about average in using space, and gifted in using of visual imagery.

Since the 1930s, psychologists have debated whether intelligence is best characterized as one thing or many.

But most psychologists stopped playing this game in the 1990s. The resolution came through the work of John Carroll, who developed a third model in which abilities form a hierarchy. We can think of abilities as separate, but nested in higher-order abilities. Hence, there is a general, all-purpose intelligence, and it influences other abilities, so they are correlated. But the abilities nested within general intelligence are independent, so the correlations are modest. Thus, Rose’s jaggedness principle is certainly not new to psychology, and it’s incomplete.

The second (Context Principle) of Rose’s principles holds that personality traits don’t exist, and there’s a similar problem with this claim: Rose describes a concept with limited predictive power as having none at all. The most commonly accepted theory holds that personality can be described by variation on five dimensions

Rose’s third principle (pathways principle) suggests that there are multiple ways to reach a goal like walking or reading, and that there is not a fixed set of stages through which each of us passes.

Rose thinks students should earn credentials, not diplomas. In other words, a school would not certify that you’re “educated in computer science” but that you have specific knowledge and skills—that you can program games on handheld devices, for example. He think grades should be replaced by testaments of competency (my note: badges); the school affirms that you’ve mastered the skills and knowledge, period. Finally, Rose argues that students should have more flexibility in choosing their educational pathways.

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more on personalized learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=personalized+learning