Posts Tagged ‘online discussion’

POD 2017

 

 

2016 POD Network Conference

http://podnetwork.org/content/uploads/2016-POD-Program-Final.pdf

https://guidebook.com/g/pod2016

Studying Connections between Student Well-Being,
Performance, and Active Learning
Amy Godert, Cornell University; Teresa Pettit, Cornell University

Treasure in the Sierra Madre? Digital Badges and Educational
Development
Chris Clark, University of Notre Dame; G. Alex Ambrose, University
of Notre Dame; Gwynn Mettetal, Indiana University South Bend;
David Pedersen, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Roberta
(Robin) Sullivan, University of Buffalo, State University of New York

Learning and Teaching Centers: The Missing Link in Data
Analytics
Denise Drane, Northwestern University; Susanna Calkins,
Northwestern University

Identifying and Supporting the Needs of International Faculty
Deborah DeZure, Michigan State University; Cindi Leverich, Michigan
State University

Online Discussions for Engaged and Meaningful Student
Learning
Danilo M. Baylen, University of West Georgia; Cheryl Fulghum,
Haywood Community College

Why Consider Online Asynchronous Educational Development?
Christopher Price, SUNY Center for Professional Development

Online, On-Demand Faculty Professional Development for Your
Campus
Roberta (Robin) Sullivan, University at Buffalo, State University of
New York; Cherie van Putten, Binghamton University, State
University of New York; Chris Price, State University of New York
The Tools of Engagement Project (http://suny.edu/toep) is an online faculty development model that encourages instructors to explore and reflect on innovative and creative uses of freely-available online educational technologies to increase student engagement and learning. TOEP is not traditional professional development but instead provides access to resources for instructors to explore at their own pace through a set of hands-on discovery activities. TOEP facilitates a learning community where participants learn from each
other and share ideas. This poster will demonstrate how you can implement TOEP at your campus by either adopting your own version or joining the existing project.

Video Captioning 101: Establishing High Standards With
Limited Resources
Stacy Grooters, Boston College; Christina Mirshekari, Boston
College; Kimberly Humphrey, Boston College
Recent legal challenges have alerted institutions to the importance of ensuring that video content for instruction is properly captioned. However, merely meeting minimum legal standards can still fall significantly short of the best practices defined by disability rights
organizations and the principles of Universal Design for Learning. Drawing from data gathered through a year-long pilot to investigate the costs and labor required to establish “in-house” captioning support at Boston College, this hands-on session seeks to give
participants the tools and information they need to set a high bar for captioning initiatives at their own institutions.

Sessions on mindfulness

52 Cognitive Neuroscience Applications for Teaching and Learning (BoF)

53 Contemplative Practices (BoF) Facilitators: Penelope Wong, Berea College; Carl S. Moore, University of the District of Columbia

79 The Art of Mindfulness: Transforming Faculty Development by Being Present Ursula Sorensen, Utah Valley University

93 Impacting Learning through Understanding of Work Life Balance Deanna Arbuckle, Walden University

113 Classroom Mindfulness Practices to Increase Attention, Creativity, and Deep Engagement Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

132 Measuring the Impacts of Mindfulness Practices in the Classroom Kelsey Bitting, Northeastern University; Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

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more on POD conferences in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=pod+conference

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups

http://home.fau.edu/musgrove/web/communication/PRACTICAL%20TIPS%20FOR%20TEACHING%20ONLINE%20GROUPS.pdf

44. Teaching in an online environment should be a team effort. You should be
able to call upon technology specialists, instructional designers, and many
others to help you develop and implement your course.