Posts Tagged ‘Pokemon Go’

Pokemon AR and hydrology

“Pokemon Go” entered the world, a smartphone game that led people to wander all around collecting imaginary creatures from everyday places.

Funding from NASA and teamed up with a citizen science app called “CitSci” to start collecting those data. The project is called Stream Tracker

While the big-river scientists work on launching satellites to keep an eye on the world’s giant rivers and lakes, the best monitoring device for these little streams remains people, walking around on the ground looking for streams instead of Pokemon — especially in dry states like this one.

 

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more on Pokemon and Augmented Reality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=pokemon

AR and PokemonGo

GOTTACATCHEMALL:EXPLORING POKEMON GO IN SEARCH OF LEARNING ENHANCEMENT OBJECTS
Annamaria Cacchione, Emma Procter-Legg and Sobah Abbas Petersen
Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Filologia, Av.da Complutense sn, 28040 Madrid, Spain Independent; Abingdon, Oxon, UK SINTEF Technology and Society, Trondheim, Norway
https://www.academia.edu/30254871/_GOTTACATCHEMALL_EXPLORING_POKEMON_GO_IN_SEARCH_OF_LEARNING_ENHANCEMENT_OBJECTS
KEYWORDS
Pokemon Go, MALL, Learning, Augmented Reality, Gamification, Situated learning
ABSTRACT
The Augmented Reality Game, Pokemon Go, took the world by storm in the summer of 2016. City landscapes were decorated with amusing, colourful objects called Pokemon, and the holiday activities were enhanced by catching these wonderful creatures. In light of this, it is inevitable for mobile language learning researchers to reflect on the impact oft his game on learning and how it may be leveraged to enhance the design of mobile and ubiquitous technologies for mobile and situated language learning. This paper analyses the game Pokemon Go and the players’ experiences accordingto a framework developed for evaluating mobile language learning and discusses how Pokemon Go can help to meetsome of the challenges faced by earlier research activities.
A comparison between PG and Geocashing will illustrate the evolution of the concept of location-based games a concept that is very close to that of situated learning that we have explored in several previous works. 
Pokémon Go is a free, location-based augmented reality game developed for mobile devices. Players useGPS on their mobile device to locate, capture, battle, and train virtual creatures (a.k.a. Pokémon), whichappear on screen overlaying the image seen through the device’s camera. This makes it seem like thePokemon are in the same real-world location as the player
“Put simply, augmented reality is a technology that overlays computer generated visuals over the real worldthrough a device camera bringing your surroundings to life and interacting with sensors such as location and heart rate to provide additional information” (Ramirez, 2014).
Apply the evaluation framework developed in 2015 for mobile learning applications(Cacchione, Procter-Legg, Petersen, & Winter, 2015). The framework is composed of a set offactors of different nature neuroscientific, technological, organisational and pedagogical and aim to provide a comprehensive account  of what plays a major role in ensuring effective learning via mobile devices

Pokemon Go for or against it

New assignment this fall in Minnesota schools: deal with ‘Pokémon Go’

Education Solvejg Wastvedt · ·
https://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/08/26/pokemon-go-school-concerns
The company accepts requests for removals via its support website
1. School administrator John Wetter took on an odd assignment over summer break at the request of one of his principals: Track down any PokéStops or gyms lurking on Hopkins school grounds. He asked game developer Niantic Labs to remove it from the game.
So far the game has only been blocked at sites such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
2. Some educators are embracing the interest in “Pokémon Go” as a potential teaching tool. “Any time something becomes a big pop culture sensation, as a teacher I try to just kind of ride the coattails,”
At St. Paul’s Washington Technology Magnet School, educator Eric Gunderson made a spinoff of “Pokémon Go” that students can play on their district-issued iPads. He created it using an augmented reality app called Aurasma. He printed pictures of eggs on sheets of paper. Get the printed egg in view of the iPad’s camera, and an animated animal appears onscreen, a knockoff Pokémon.
The Minnesota Department of Education said it hasn’t gotten inquiries from school districts concerned about “Pokémon Go.” A spokesperson for the Osseo Area School District noted that students face many distractions. “Our leaders are very skilled in dealing with whatever the distraction of the day is,” the spokesperson wrote in an email.

Pokemon Go

Hello All,

I’ve started a Pokemon Go syllabus on Google docs (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1xYuozfkON-RVZQkr7d1qLPJrCRqN8TkzeDySM-3pzeA/edit?usp=sharing <https://docs.google.com/document/d/1xYuozfkON-RVZQkr7d1qLPJrCRqN8TkzeDySM-3pzeA/edit?usp=sharing>). Please add links to articles, critique, commentary, etc. as you see fit. I hope this can be a useful resource for us who might be thinking about teaching/discussing the game in our classes, or are just looking for some context around the game when discussing it with students or colleagues.

Feel free to share widely. And, be sure to add your name in the “contributors” section if you do add/edit the doc.

Thanks,
Adrienne

Adrienne Massanari, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Communication
University of Illinois at Chicago
@hegemonyrules
http://www.adriennemassanari.com <http://www.adriennemassanari.com/>