Posts Tagged ‘privacy’

RFID blocking

There Are Plenty Of RFID-Blocking Products, But Do You Need Them?

hackers can access your credit card data wirelessly, through something called radio frequency identification, or RFID

card has a tiny RFID sensor chip. These chips are supposed to make life easier by emitting radio signals for fast identification. The technology helps keep track of livestock and inventory. It makes automatic payment on toll roads and faster scanning of passports possible, and, starting around 2004, brought us contactless payment with certain credit cards.

REI and other companies sell a range of RFID-blocking products and say the number of customers looking for travel bags and credit card sleeves has been growing. That’s despite the fact that the percentage of credit cards with RFID chips in the U.S. is extremely small.

Still, people are worried about electronic pickpocketing — worried enough to strap on RFID-blocking fanny packs, even skinny jeans. In 2014, the San Francisco-based clothing company Betabrand partnered with Norton Security to create the first pair of denim with RFID protected pockets.

Eva Velasquez, president of the Identity Theft Resource Center, says from a consumer perspective, deciding whether to invest in RFID-blocking technology is all about evaluating risk. In the next few years, there will undoubtedly be millions more of these cards on the market.

if you’re worried about e-pickpocketing but don’t want to spend much money, you can make your own blocking wallet or wrap your cards or passport in a thick piece of aluminum foil. According to Consumer Reports, that works as well as most RFID protectors on the market.
+++++++++++++++
more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog

not on your work computer

6 things you should never do on your work computer

Amy Elisa Jackson, Glassdoor Mar. 15, 2017, 10:45 AM

http://www.businessinsider.com/things-you-should-never-do-on-your-work-computer-2017-3

cyber security experts say that weaving your personal and professional lives together via a work laptop is risky business — for you and the company. Software technology company Check Point conducted a survey of over 700 IT professionals which revealed that nearly two-thirds of IT pros believed that recent high-profile breaches were caused by employee carelessness.

  1. DON’T: Save personal passwords in your work device keychain.
  2. DON’T: Make off-color jokes on messaging software.
  3. DON’T: Access free public wi-fi while working on sensitive material.
  4. DON’T: Allow friends or non-IT department colleagues to remotely access your work computer.
  5. DON’T: Store personal data.
  6. DON’T: Work on your side hustle while at the office.

++++++++++++++
more on privacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

more on surveillance in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

section 702

4 Big Intelligence Stories You Missed Amid The Comey Headlines This Week

++++++++++++++++++
more on surveillance and privacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

edmodo accounts compromised

Edmodo Investigates Millions of User Accounts for Sale on Dark Web

By Sri Ravipati  05/12/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/05/12/millions-of-edmodo-user-accounts-for-sale-on-dark-web.aspx

A hacker going by the name “nclay” claims to have stolen more than 77 million user accounts from Edmodo

LeakBase yesterday Tweeted that the top domains for the data breach include:

  • @gmail.com, accounting for 19 percent of the accounts at 13,286,240;
  • @hotmail.com, making up 10 percent of the accounts at 7,065,761; and
  • @yahoo.com, at 8 percent with 6,074,901 accounts.

+++++++++++++++++++++
more on Edmodo in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edmodo

student privacy

Report: Tech Companies Are Spying on Children Through Devices and Software Used in Classroom

By Richard Chang 04/17/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/04/17/report-tech-companies-are-spying-on-children-through-devices-and-software-used-in-classroom.aspx

according to a new report from the nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), “Spying on Students: School-Issued Devices and Student Privacy

shows that state and federal laws, as well as industry self-regulation, have failed to keep up with a growing education technology industry.

One-third of all K–12 students in the United States use school-issued devices running software and apps that collect far more information on kids than is necessary.

Resource-poor school districts can receive these tools at deeply discounted prices or for free, as tech companies seek a slice of the $8 billion ed tech industry. But there’s a real, devastating cost — the tracking, cataloging and exploitation of data about children as young as 5 years old.

Our report shows that the surveillance culture begins in grade school, which threatens to normalize the next generation to a digital world in which users hand over data without question in return for free services

EFF surveyed more than 1,000 stakeholders across the country, including students, parents, teachers and school administrators, and reviewed 152 ed tech privacy policies.

“Spying on Students” provides comprehensive recommendations for parents, teachers, school administrators and tech companies to improve the protection of student privacy. Asking the right questions, negotiating for contracts that limit or ban data collection, offering families the right to opt out, and making digital literacy and privacy part of the school curriculum are just a few of the 70-plus recommendations for protecting student privacy contained in the report.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++
more on students and privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=student+privacy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy+government

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2017/03/us-senate-votes-50-48-away-broadband-privacy-rules-let-isps-telecoms-sell-internet-history/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/03/28/the-house-just-voted-to-wipe-out-the-fccs-landmark-internet-privacy-protections/?utm_term=.34ed3dce7494

 

against government hackers

How to defend against government hackers

By Mark Rockwell Mar 31, 2017

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/03/31/rule41-aclu-defense-cyber.aspx

The 188-page “Challenging Government Hacking In Criminal Cases” report, released by the American Civil Liberties Union on March 30, addresses new amendments to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, which took effect last December.

Under the changes to criminal procedure rules, feds can remotely search computers in multiple jurisdictions with a single warrant. The rules are touted by law enforcement agencies as a way to streamline 100-year-old rules of criminal procedure

++++++++++++++++++++++++
more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

CIA hacks

WikiLeaks: Here’s how the CIA hacks your phones, TVs and PCs

The organization released thousands of documents it claims show how the US spy agency can crack open devices from Apple, Samsung, Google and Microsoft.

  https://www.cnet.com/news/wikileaks-cia-hacking-tools-phones-apple-samsung-microsoft-google/

This debate took off when the US Department of Justice sought to require Apple to help it open an encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters. After Apple fought back in court, the FBI said it had obtained another way to access the phone.

Apple, Google and Motorola declined to comment on WikiLeaks’ claims. Samsung didn’t respond to a request for comment.

“The CIA/Wikileaks story today is about getting malware onto phones, none of the exploits are in Signal or break Signal Protocol encryption,” said Moxie Marlinspike, the founder of Signal. “This story isn’t about Signal or WhatsApp, but to the extent that it is, we see it as confirmation that what we’re doing is working.”

Telegram said on its website that the problem lies with operating systems and not encrypted messaging apps and that naming specific encrypted services is “misleading.” WhatsApp declined to comment.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

cyberwarfare

How to define cyber-enabled economic warfare

By Sean D. Carberry Feb 23, 2017

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/02/23/critical-ceew-cyber-carbery.aspx

“Framework and Terminology for Understanding Cyber-Enabled Economic Warfare,” a new report by Samantha F. Ravich and Annie Fixler for the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Cyber-enabled economic warfare is a “hostile strategy involving attack(s) against a nation using cyber technology with the intent to weaken its economy and thereby reduce its political and military power.”

For example, China’s economic theft of intellectual property from the U.S. is considered CEEW, along with Russia’s cyberattack on Estonia and Iran’s Saudi Aramco attack. The authors also contend that the U.S. sanctions on Iran using cyber means to cut off Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication access also falls under CEEW.

http://www.defenddemocracy.org/content/uploads/documents/22217_Cyber_Definitions.pdf

+++++++++++++++++++
more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

confide app

White House staffers are using this self-destructing messages app to gossip in private — here’s how it works

+++++++++++++++
more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

tech in China

The uncomfortable truth about tech in China

By Steve Kelman https://fcw.com/blogs/lectern/2017/02/kelman-china-innovation.aspx

Only recently, the general view in the U.S. was that the less-free Chinese system created a poor environment for tech innovation. Put somewhat simply, the argument was that in a society without our kind of freedom of speech or unrestricted access to communication such as the Internet, people would miss out on information and ideas that come from a free system and feel more psychologically constrained from venturing off the beaten path with innovative ideas. The Chinese would be limited, in this view, to knock-offs of U.S. technologies.

The government has also cracked down on use of virtual private networks that Chinese, especially young people, have used to “climb the wall” (i.e. find sites outside the “Great Firewall of China”). And recently, there were media complaints that at the top elite universities such as Tsinghua the anti-VPN policy was not being enforced strictly enough.

Clearly, though, Chinese progress has taken place despite these restrictions.

we should not naively assume that all good (or bad) things go together. Maybe freedom of political and cultural expression is not as important as we have thought for advances, say, in information technology. But it still might be more important for development of less technical or scientific ideas such as public policy proposals or cultural expressions.

+++++++++++++++++++++
more on virtual networks for civic activities
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/30/disruptive-technologies-from-swarming-to-mesh-networking/

1 2 3 5