Posts Tagged ‘SAMR model’

SAMR personalized learning

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-18-what-the-samr-model-may-be-missing

Developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, the SAMR Model aims to guide teachers in integrating technology into their classrooms. It consists of four steps: Substitution (S), Augmentation (A), Modification (M), and Redefinition (R).

The SAMR Model

The problem with many personalized learning tools is that they live mostly in realm of Substitution or Augmentation tasks. 

It’s in moments like these that we see the SAMR model, while laying an excellent foundation, isn’t enough. When considering which technologies to incorporate into my teaching, I like to consider four key questions, each of which build upon strong foundation that SAMR provides.

1. Does the technology help to minimize complexity?

2. Does the technology help to maximize the individual power and potential of all learners in the room?

use Popplet and iCardSort regularly in my classroom—flexible tools that allow my students to demonstrate their thinking through concept mapping and sorting words and ideas.

3. Will the technology help us to do something previously unimaginable?

4. Will the technology preserve or enhance human connection in the classroom?

Social media is a modern-day breakthrough in human connection and communication. While there are clear consequences to social media culture, there are clear upsides as well. Seesaw, a platform for student-driven digital portfolios, is an excellent example of a tool that enhances human connection.

++++++++++++++++++++++
more on SAMR and TRACK models in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/17/transform-education-digital-tools/

more on personalized learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=personalized+learning

transform education via digital tools

Digital tools can transform, not just replicate, the teaching and learning experience

Commentary: The SAMR and TPACK models of technology implementation can help schools as they transition to using more digital tools.

By EdScoop Staff  MAY 8, 2018 2:37 PM

https://edscoop.com/digital-tools-can-transform-not-just-replicate-the-teaching-and-learning-experience

The SAMR (substitution, augmentation, modification, redefinition) model and TPACK (technological pedagogical content knowledge) model can help schools as they transition to using more digital tools.

In a recent edWebinar, Michelle Luhtala, library department chair at New Canaan High School in Connecticut, reviewed these models and discussed apps that can take teaching, learning and reading to the next level.

The SAMR model determines the level of technology integration of a tool: substitution, which doesn’t add value; augmentation, which adds a few features with only a little improvement; modification, which redesigns some structures; and redefinition, which allows the creation of new tasks and is the ultimate learning goal. Transformation in how educators are teaching and how students are understanding content happens in the modification and redefinition parts of the model.

MackinVIA’s Classroom allows educators to create a collection of digital content for students; build assignment around it; and share the collection, or an individual book, with the classroom. Students can also highlight text, make annotations, and save these to Google Drive.

Emerging Tech for Schools and Libraries is a free professional learning community where school librarians, teachers, and administrators can explore all the ways to integrate technology and 21st century learning into school library programs.

+++++++++++++++++++
more on the SAMR model in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=samr

student digital storytellers

Check out our LIB 490/590 Digital Storytelling class: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/ Subscribe: https://www.facebook.com/groups/SCSUDigitalStorytelling/ Share your thoughts and ideas: https://goo.gl/forms/pbtikak6M45YRp0z2

++++++++++++

A Guide to Producing Student Digital Storytellers

By Michael Hernandez     Aug 26, 2015 https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-08-26-a-guide-to-producing-student-digital-storytellers

What is Digital Storytelling?

Digital storytelling uses video, audio, social media, blogging and other tools to convey ideas and information effectively. The emphasis is on empowering students to create authentic products that they can share with others beyond the classroom walls, and to allow for audience interaction and feedback.

why should we inspire students to be digital storytellers?

Requires critical thinking: Creating an interdisciplinary product from scratch requires high level thinking skills like evaluating evidence, editing and curation, and production timelines. Digital stories often use multiple skills like writing, public speaking, photography, design and collaboration in a single project which makes them ideal for practicing skills learned other units or classes.

Authentic projects have impact: Creating real-world, impactful products that students share with an audience beyond the classroom is one of the best ways to enhance motivation and increase quality.

Places focus on writing: A picture is worth a thousand words, and video is 30 photos a second. It has its own grammar and style, but concepts of content, structure, tone and audience impact are just as important in multimedia as they are for an essay. Scripts, voiceovers and interview questions emphasize traditional writing skills and are the backbone of all multimedia projects.

Develops digital citizens: What to post online, when and how are all important questions for our students to learn to answer. Require them to comment on others’ work and develop etiquette for online posts and feedback. Rather than being afraid of the internet, embrace it to teach digital citizenship.

Students can add to digital portfolios: All student work can be compiled into a digital portfolio that they can use to promote themselves for jobs/internships

How to Educate Digital Storytellers

1. Focus on content, not the tools

2. Take it to the next “SAMR level.” The SAMR model is a way to gauge how deeply and effectively you use technology (Salvador Dali)

3. Develop expectations and outcomes

4. Start small

5. Evaluate early on and often

+++++++++++++

http://edtechteacher.org/tools/multimedia/digital-storytelling/

++++++++++++
How to Use Digital Storytelling in Your Classroom

Empower student creativity with affordable and accessible technology.

++++++++++++
more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

Curriculum or the Technology

What Comes First: the Curriculum or the Technology?

http://www.edudemic.com/what-comes-first-the-curriculum-or-technology/

  • Regardless of the technology, what’s the most important lesson for students to learn?
  • Why do I need to use technology in my daily curriculum?
  • How are these tech tools enhancing what we’re doing?
  • What will the students do with these tools – during and after class?

Think Curriculum Enhancements, Not Technology Implementations

1) Learn How Students Are Using Technology at Home

2) Don’t Use Technology for the Sake of Using Technology

3) Focus on Just One Tech Implementation

4) Utilize the SAMR Model

The SAMR model, developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, represents the stages of tech integration: Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition. This model challenges us to assess and reflect on not only how we integrate technology into our curriculum, but also how we modify, redefine and transform our classrooms through its use.

5) Actively Seek Out Professional Development Opportunities

  • Younger students utilizing QR codes to add a challenging yet fun element to learning to spell.
  • Older students creating digital books or movies to demonstrate a deep understanding on a topic, rather than simply discussing or assessing it.
  • Video conferencing with other schools in your area or network to research, discuss, debate and develop potential solutions to globally significant problems.
  • Skyping with local leaders and guest speakers on specific topics such as coding or programming, networking and composing music.

In Short

Integrating technology into the classroom can be exhilarating, fun, and at times a little scary. That said, I’ve often found that teachers are hungry for more information, and welcome the chance to bring new ideas to the classroom.

In the end, if teachers and their administration are ready to embrace the messiness and the risks that sometimes come with technology, the reward is that your school’s curriculum – which must be strong to start – can truly be taken to the next level, and beyond. Otherwise, we’ll all be still left trying to figure out how an abacus works.