Posts Tagged ‘social media and education’

bootstrap social media libraries

35th Anniversary Program – Fall 2017

Indiana Online User Group

Breakout Sessions:

  • Codeless Coding: “Writing” Bootstrap HTML without Coding, Randal Harrison, University of Notre Dame
  • Using Social Media in the Classroom, Jennifer Joe, Western Kentucky University
  • Integrating EDS into the Curriculum: Using Search Queries to Enrich Information Literacy Endeavors, Angie Pusnik, Indiana University Kokomo, Rachael Cohen, Indiana University Bloomington
  • The Librarian Publisher: The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly, Heather Rayl, Vigo County Public Library

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social media elearning

Mnkandla, Ernest, and Ansie Minnaar. 2017. “The Use of Social Media in E-Learning: A Metasynthesis.” The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning 18 (5).
This research represents a conceptual framework designed to explain the adoption of social media into e-learning by using online collaborative learning (OCL) in higher education. Social media in e-learning signals the end of distance education in higher education.
The proposed framework could be useful to instructional designers and academics who are interested in using modern learning theories and want to adopt social media in e-learning in higher education as a deep learning strategy.
The major paradigms underlying the theoretical frameworks that were investigated were included in social learning theory, social interactivity theory, constructionism and social constructivism, and online collaborative learning theory (Harasim, 2012). Collaboration and social constructivism were the main theoretical frameworks guiding the use of social media in e-learning in higher education that point towards a more integrative (collaborative) and co-constructivism peer supportive approach to learning in the digital age.
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snapchat for patrons

Using Snapchat to Reach Library Patrons Workshop

A two-part workshop running 90 minutes each session on Thursday, August 24, 2017 at 2:30pm Eastern/1:30 Central/12:30 Mountain/11:30am Pacific and Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 2:30pm Eastern/1:30 Central/12:30 Mountain/11:30am Pacific

Snapchat is one of the 10 most downloaded apps in the world and a key means of communication for individuals aged 13-34. Emerging quickly onto the social media scene, Snapchat has left many librarians wondering how to incorporate it into their outreach strategy. In this two-part workshop, social media expert Paige Alfonzo responds to this question and teaches you how to successfully leverage Snapchat as a marketing tool—one that can be used for readers’ advisory, promotion, information dissemination, and a variety of other marketing purposes.

In part one, Alfonzo covers the ins and outs of the platform—from teaching you the basics of setting up an account, adding friends, and sending snaps to demonstrating how to annotate snaps, incorporate filters, and use Snapchat Stories and Memories. In part two, Alfonzo delves into the specifics of how to make Snapchat work in libraries by discussing how librarians have successfully used Snapchat to promote their services, then she provides you with an opportunity to participate hands on with Snapchat by sending snaps to each other. The workshop will leave you with useful approaches to get creative with the app and expand your social media strategy.

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social media in classroom

Social Media in the Classroom: Teaching the tools at your students’ fingertips today will prepare them for what’s to come in the future.


Visual Literacy. Using Instagram to select a single photo to capture an overall concept would transfer to so many subject areas.

People, in general, love Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other networks, because they want to share their pictures, videos and thoughts with the world; this sort of sharing makes people feel important. When kids feel important about what they share, they, in turn, believe that what they learn is important. This is truly what 21st-century learning is about.

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social media in education

7 Ways Social Media Has a Role in Education

  1. The Stats – College, Career, and Citizenship Success
    Look who’s watching:
    • 1/4 of college admissions officers consider digital footprint
    • 3/4 of human resource managers
    • 1/3 of employers reject candidates based on something found in profiles
More stats and info at
  1. Ensuring Students Are Well Googled
    Here are some ways to get started. My note: well LinkedIn
  2. Social Credibility is the New Credentialing
     Read more about how Armond developed social credibility here.
  3. Student Learning Networks
    In the age of social media, the teacher is no longer the center of learning. The student is. One of the most important things an educator can do is support students in developing a powerful learning network. It also requires an understanding of how to effectively use these tools to connect, collaborate, and grow learning. Want to know more? 15-year-old Alex Laubscher explains here.
  4. Work More Effectively
    Social media allows you to change the paradigm from “teacher” as expert to “group” as expert. This reduces emails and increases the access to good answers and connections.  My note: it is extremely important to understand that “teacher” in this case covers librarians
  5. Connect with Experts via Twitter
    You can find a world of experts on any topic if you have literacy in using Twitter also know as “Twitteracy.”  Just know the right hashtags and how to find experts and you have the world’s best knowledge at your fingertips. It is better than any rolodex allowing you to connect anytime, anywhere, with the interested parties who are available now.
  6. Release the Amazing Work of Students from the Classroom to the World
    We hear stories in passing about the great work happening in schools, but usually it’s locked in a school or classroom or trapped on a laptop. Social media puts an end to that.  Click here to find out what it was.

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