Posts Tagged ‘social media literacy’

snapchat for patrons

Using Snapchat to Reach Library Patrons Workshop

A two-part workshop running 90 minutes each session on Thursday, August 24, 2017 at 2:30pm Eastern/1:30 Central/12:30 Mountain/11:30am Pacific and Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 2:30pm Eastern/1:30 Central/12:30 Mountain/11:30am Pacific

Snapchat is one of the 10 most downloaded apps in the world and a key means of communication for individuals aged 13-34. Emerging quickly onto the social media scene, Snapchat has left many librarians wondering how to incorporate it into their outreach strategy. In this two-part workshop, social media expert Paige Alfonzo responds to this question and teaches you how to successfully leverage Snapchat as a marketing tool—one that can be used for readers’ advisory, promotion, information dissemination, and a variety of other marketing purposes.

In part one, Alfonzo covers the ins and outs of the platform—from teaching you the basics of setting up an account, adding friends, and sending snaps to demonstrating how to annotate snaps, incorporate filters, and use Snapchat Stories and Memories. In part two, Alfonzo delves into the specifics of how to make Snapchat work in libraries by discussing how librarians have successfully used Snapchat to promote their services, then she provides you with an opportunity to participate hands on with Snapchat by sending snaps to each other. The workshop will leave you with useful approaches to get creative with the app and expand your social media strategy.

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=12115&zbrandid=4634&zidType=CH&zid=45997474&zsubscriberId=1026665847&zbdom=http://ala-publishing.informz.net

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more on social media for the library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+library

social media in the library

please have two great articles on the use of social media in the library:
1. Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library

Vanwynsberghe, H.., Boudry, E.., Verdegem, P.., & Vanderlinde, R.. (2014). Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library? A social network approach. Library Hi Tech, 32(3), 529-545. doi:10.1108/LHT-02-2014-0015

Excellent article. Apparently, they do things differently in Belgium.

“Social media literacy” (SML) can be defined as not only the practical
and critically cognitive competencies possessed by users of social media, but also the
motivation to employ these media effectively and appropriately for social interaction
and communication on the web (Vanwynsberghe and Verdegem, 2013).

Repeated by me numerous times, but ignored consistently.

p. 530 Therefore, the aim of this study is to empirically assess how a social media expert, or the employee with the most knowledge and skills concerning social media, in the library facilitates, or impedes, the information flow and implementation of social media in the library.
p. 541 The findings suggest that such social media experts play a significant role in either supporting or constraining the information flow and implementation of social media.

5.2 A social media expert plays an important role in the library for spreading
information about social media Unsurprisingly, social media experts are the most central actors for giving social media information; they share more social media information with other librarians and rarely receive information in return. Any information they do receive mostly comes from a person skilled in social media use. The social media expert as the central actor in the information network has the power to facilitate or prevent information exchange about social media (Scott and Carrington, 2012).

this is, if the experts are ALLOWED to participate. What if the social media access is usurped by very few others?

even worse, what if the social media is decentralized across?

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2.
Woodsworth, A., & Penniman, W. D. (2015). Current Issues in Libraries, Information Science and Related Fields. Emerald Group Publishing.
https://books.google.com/books?id=yMXrCQAAQBAJ&lpg=PA256&ots=74zfMzv16V&dq=Abigail%20Phillips%20social%20media&pg=PA256#v=onepage&q=Abigail%20Phillips%20social%20media&f=false
Mon, L. and Phillips, A. (2015) ‘The social library in the virtual branch: Serving adults and teens in social spaces’, in Current Issues in Libraries, Information Science and Related Fields. Emerald, pp. 241–268.
The Social Library in the Virtual Branch
p. 256 Lorri Mon and Abigail Phillips. Measuring and Assessing the Results of Social Media Activities
public libraries
at the moment the success is assessed and quantified according the activity by the library and the users.
beyond the activities of viewing, friending, liking, following, commenting, mentioning, and sharing and re-sharing, an important question is: How has this social media activity contributed to furthering the library’s mission, goal, and objectives?
p. 257 Assessing the impact, influence and reach of the library’s social media requires more effort than simply counting followers, friends and likes; e.g. assessing friends or followers as a percentage of the library’s services area.
Planning an impact assessment might involve measuring traffic to the physical library or to specific library web pages before and after FB or Twitter posting, or measuring usage of particular resources before and after a social media promotion.

The librarian 2.0 social media literacy

The librarian 2.0: Identifying a typology of librarians’ social media literacy

http://lis.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/01/28/0961000613520027.full.pdf

Social media is the unifying term for these ‘new digital media phenomena […] in which ordinary users (i.e. not only media professionals) can com- municate with each other and create and share content with others online through their personal networked computers and digital mobile devices’ (Bechmann and Lomborg, 2013: 767).

First, social media communication is de-institutionalized, which means that media companies alone do not control the flow and distribution of information. Second, social media users are also information and content producers. We refer here to the collapse of production and consump- tion roles, labelled ‘prosumer’ (Jenkins, 2006) or ‘produs- age’ (Bruns, 2008). Third, social media communication is interactive and networked in nature.

public libraries must reconsider their positions as public knowledge providers (Anttiroiko and Savolainen, 2007). As a modern librarian’s task is to be able to use and distribute information in many formats other than print, he or she must be able to use all media, including digital media and social media.

social media literacy’ (SML), which is understood as ‘not only the practical and cognitive competencies pos- sessed by users of social media but also the motivation to employ these media effectively and appropriately for social interaction and communication on the web’ (Vanwynsberghe and Verdegem, 2013).

Zurkowski (1974: 6) defines ‘information literacy’ as the ability to utilize ‘the wide range of information tools as well as primary sources in modelling information solutions to their prob- lems’. With the rise of the Internet as a seemingly infinite source of information, the concept of information literacy gains more urgency (Sharpio and Hughes, 1996). In this respect, information literacy now includes having skills to identify an information problem (e.g. an unanswered ques- tion), accessing the location where information can be found, evaluating the information and using this informa- tion in problem-solving activities (Livingstone et al., 2005

The concept of information literacy was developed in the context of print media, while the concept of media literacy originated in the context of audio-visual media.  media literacy was framed as the ability to critically under- stand media messages. Information literacy instead focuses on the basic competence of locating information since infor- mation is often difficult to find or use.

In con- trast to information literacy research, media literacy research has also paid attention to questions related to the creation of content (Livingstone et al., 2008).

The second cluster consists of respondents who have the lowest score for SML factors and consequently are labelled social media laggards.    corresponds to people who have a rather negative attitude towards social media and do not (often) use social media at work or at home. Furthermore, social media laggards also have a very low level of social media knowledge and com- petencies. Of the respondents, 23.91% belong to this clus- ter; they have a high probability of being female and predominantly belong to older age groups.

The third cluster is the most social media literate group; therefore, we label respondents who fit within this cluster, social media literate users.  Though its members are usually female, this social media literate cluster contains the most men in comparison to the other clusters. The members of this cluster are situated in the younger age groups.  Hence, social media literates and social media workers include librarians who can serve as facili- tators or agents to guide and support other librarians dur- ing social media implementation.

four SML profiles: social media workers, social media laggards, social media literates and social media spare-time users. Social media workers are librarians who use social media mostly in the library and have a relatively high level of SML. Social media laggards do not use social media frequently either at home or at work and have a low level of SML. The social media literates are librarians who frequently use social media at home and at work and have a high level of SML. Finally, social media spare-time users are librarians who frequently use social media at home but not in the library and have an average level of SML.