Posts Tagged ‘webinar’

rise of iGeneration

ELI Webinar | The Rise of the iGeneration and Its Impact on Higher Education

Monday, May 07 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm ET | Online

https://events.educause.edu/eli/webinars/2018/the-rise-of-the-igeneration-and-its-impact-on-higher-education

Outcomes

  • Explore how iGen compares to other generations
  • Learn about iGen’s beliefs, preferences, and behaviors
  • Connect these behaviors to program needs, marketing challenges, technology and workforce implications, and other factors

The iGeneration—the part of Generation Z that is high school or college age—has been estimated at 42 million strong. Due to recent events and the influence of families and social networks, this segment is finding its voice and power much quicker than its predecessors, the Millennials.

Speakers

new D2L Brightspace features

What: Overview of new D2L Brightspace features
When: Monday, April 9 at 10:00 AM
Please join us to learn about the new features that will be available in D2L Brightspace as of June 2, 2018. The session will be recorded.

D2L cloud is the big news. stcloudstate.learn.minnstate.edu will be the link to log into the cloud.

Here are the latest updates on Minnesota State’s move to D2L Brightspace cloud services.
Review a recording (44:07) or slides from the session.  A comprehensive list of features is also available for faculty. This document will be updated again after April 10 and May 7 releases are available at our QA cloud sites.

To explore these new features on your own, go to your “quality assurance” (QA) test site in D2L’s cloud available athttps://YourCampusQA.brightspace.comhttps://stcloudstate.brightspace.com

Quizzes, HTML editor and intelligent agents have videos featuring new stuff.

  • HTML Editor – Edit images in the editor. See video (2:30)
  • Intelligent Agents – See video (4:36)
  • Quiz/Question Library – The ability to search the text of quiz questions. See video (7:00)
  • Quizzes – Add a quiz due date, in addition to a start and end date.
  • Quiz Taking – Students start and submit a quiz with fewer clicks.
  • Manage Dates Tool –  ‘Due Dates’ are now included.
  • Additional features will be rolled out to the QA cloud on April 10 (version 10.8.0) and May 7 (version 10.8.1)
  • ePortfolio -“A digital showcase for the learning journey. It helps you document the experience, reflect on it, and share ideas and achievements as they happen.”  D2L has provided an overview video and a video to help you navigate this new tool for Minnesota State campuses.  Look for an invitation to an overview session on April 18.

IP restriction, which is supposed to alleviate proctoring issues. But this will work only for oncampus quizzes. not for online classes.

The Quiz library being moved to the cloud. Does this mean that the Quiz Library can be shared across institutions? E.g. if faculty from one university is teaching biology and has developed a quiz library content, it can be shared with the content of a faculty from another university? All bells and whistles so far are only secondary to the fact that content generation remains most important for faculty and if faculty can share their test banks, I see this as the most advantageous of moving to a cloud.

eportfolio – new D2L tool. April 18 overview scheduled. so, isn’t in collision with TK20? I, personally, think that LInkedIn is the way to go. I will not mention eFolio MN, since it is a losing bet.
So, how we reconcile the existence of several platforms for eportofolio?

SSO. single sign on. Adobe Connect, Mediaspace and service desk are already on SSO. signing in one application allows to move to D2L without having to sign on again.

https://mnscu.sharepoint.com/sites/ims/SitePages/Home.aspx

on that site, there are resources for faculty: https://mnscu.sharepoint.com/sites/IMS/SitePages/Faculty%20Resources.aspx

Innovation, Infrastructure, and Digital Learning

Notes from the webinar:
What is Digital Learning

 

 

 

Technology is a metaphor for change, it is also a metaphor for risk

technology is a means of uncertainly reduction that is made possible by the cause-effect relationship upon which the technology is based.

technology innovation creates a kind of uncertainty in the minds of potential adopters as well as represent an opportunity for reduced uncertainty.

The Diffusion of Innovations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffusion_of_innovations

https://web.stanford.edu/class/symbsys205/Diffusion%20of%20Innovations.htm

diffusion of innovations

 

technology is disruptive

  • issues and impacts | response
  • organizational practice and process |  denial, anger
  • individual behaviors and preferences | bargaining
  • visualization: can I see me/us doing that | depression, acceptance

as per https://www.amazon.com/Death-Dying-Doctors-Nurses-Families/dp/1476775540

The key campus tech issues are no longer about IT (in the past e.g.: MS versus Apple). IT is the “easy part” of technology on campus. The challenges: people, planning policy, programs, priorities, silos, egos, and IT entitlements

How do we make Digital Learning compelling and safe for the faculty? provide evidence of impact, support, recognition and reward for faculty; communicate about effectiveness of and need for IT resources.

technology is not capital cost, it is operational cost. reoccurring.

Visualization:

underlying issues; can i do this? why should i do this? evidence of benefit?

http://www.sonicfoundry.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Green-PlusCaChange-EDUCAUSEReview-Sept2015.pdf

the more things change, the more things stay the same. new equilibrium.

change: from what did you do wrong to how do we do better. Use data as a resources, not as a weapon. there is a fear of trying, because there is no recognition or reward

Machiavelli: 1. concentrate your efforts 2. pick your issues carefully, know when to fight 3. know the history 4. build coalitions 5. set modest goals – and realistic 6. leverage the value of data (use it as resource not weapon) 7. anticipate personnel turnover 8. set deadlines for decisions

Colleagues,

We apologize for the short notice, but wanted to make you aware of the following opportunity: provide

From Ken Graetz at Winona State University:

As part of our Digital Faculty Fellows Program at WSU, Dr. Kenneth C. Green will be speaking this Thursday, March 22nd in Stark 103 Miller Auditorium from 11:30 to 12:30 on “Innovation, Infrastructure, and Digital Learning.” We will be streaming Casey’s talk using Skype Meeting Broadcast and you can join as a guest using the following link: Join the presentation. This will allow you to see and hear his presentation, as well as post moderated questions. By way of a teaser, here is a recent quote from Dr. Green’s blog, DigitalTweed, published by Inside Higher Ed:

“If trustees, presidents, provosts, deans, and department chairs really want to address the fear of trying and foster innovation in instruction, then they have to recognize that infrastructure fosters innovation.  And infrastructure, in the context of technology and instruction, involves more than just computer hardware, software, digital projectors in classrooms, learning management systems, and campus web sites. The technology is actually the easy part. The real challenges involve a commitment to research about the impact of innovation in instruction, and recognition and reward for those faculty who would like to pursue innovation in their instructional activities.”

Dr. Green is the founding director of The Campus Computing Project, the largest continuing study of the role of digital learning and information technology in American colleges and universities. Campus Computing is widely cited as a definitive source for data, information, and insight about IT planning and policy issues affecting higher education. Dr. Green also serves as the director, moderator, and co-producer of TO A DEGREE, the postsecondary success podcast of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He is the author or editor of some 20 books and published research reports and more than 100 articles and commentaries that have appeared in academic journals and professional publications. In 2002, Dr. Green received the first EDUCAUSE Award for Leadership in Public Policy and Practice. The EDUCAUSE award cites his work in creating The Campus Computing Project and recognizes his, “prominence in the arena of national and international technology agendas, and the linking of higher education to those agendas.”

Casey’s most recent TO A DEGREE podcasts are available now: Presidential Leadership in Challenging Times and Online’s Bottom Line.

Hope to see some of you online and please forward this invitation to anyone who might be interested.

Ken Graetz, PhD, Director of Teaching, Learning, and Technology Services, Winona State University, 507-429-3270

students and social media

Students and Social Media: How Much is Too Much?

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2018 | 1:00 PM CENTRAL | 60 MINUTES

Instant communication with one another (and the world) has tremendous benefits. At the same time, it has serious drawbacks that tend to offset those advantages. The evidence is mounting that students’ overreliance on their cherished devices is interfering with their critical thinking and problem-solving skills, ultimately impacting their emotional health, mental health, and academic performance.

How can your institution assist students in the digitally-obsessed information age?

Register today for the Magna Online Seminar, Students and Social Media: How Much is Too Much?, presented by Aaron Hughey, EdD. You’ll explore ways to develop and implement a blueprint for effectively assisting students who are experiencing emotional and mental challenges due to their overindulgence in social media.

BENEFITS

Through the evidence-based best practices and insights gleaned through this seminar, you’ll be able to respond more effectively to the needs of students who are experiencing emotional and mental health challenges due to their overinvolvement with social media.

LEARNING GOALS

Upon completion of this seminar, you’ll be able to:

  • Understand how today’s students are qualitatively different from their predecessors 15-20 years ago
  • Articulate why technology has both benefits and challenges
  • Describe the prevalence of emotional and mental issues among today’s college students
  • Describe the emerging relationship between overinvolvement with social media and emotional issues
  • Educate students, faculty, staff, and student affairs professionals regarding social media and how overinvolvement can precipitate stress, anxiety, depression, and even suicide and violence
  • Recognize basic symptomology and warning signs associated with overinvolvement with social media, as well as response techniques

TOPICS COVERED

  • Characteristics of today’s college students and the similarities/differences from previous generations
  • How technology has affected the way students learn
  • Emotional and mental issues among today’s college student population
  • The increase in addiction disorders in today’s college students
  • Overinvolvement with social media and emotional and mental health issues
  • Social media and stress, anxiety, depression, violence, and suicide
  • Emotional states and their connection to social media
  • Symptomology and warning signs
  • Intervention techniques

AUDIENCE

This seminar is designed for anyone at any institution who is responsible for the mental and emotional well-being of college students, especially faculty, administrators, and staff of departments that provide direct services to students, including college counseling centers, student health centers, career and academic advising services, housing and residence hall professionals and paraprofessionals, student activities and organizations, academic support services, and programs and services for at-risk students.

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more on social media and students in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+students

rethinking digital literacy

Rethinking Digital Literacy to Serve Library Staff and Users
facilitated by Paul Signorelli

4-week eCourse
Beginning Monday, May 14, 2018

What is digital literacy? Do you know how you can foster digital literacy through formal and informal learning opportunities for your library staff and users?

Supporting digital literacy still remains an important part of library staff members’ work, but sometimes we struggle to agree on a simple, meaningful definition of the term. In this four-week eCourse, training/learning specialist Paul Signorelli begins by exploring a variety of definitions, focusing on work by a few leading proponents of the need to foster digital literacy among people of all ages and backgrounds. He explores a variety of digital-literacy resources – including case studies of how we creatively approach digital-literacy learning opportunities for library staff and users, and explores a variety of digital tools that will help to encourage further understanding of this topic.

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

STAR Symposium 2018

https://softchalkcloud.com/lesson/serve/tAyfSOjZTkVW05/html

Keynote: Dr. Todd Zakrajsek, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

“Teaching for Brain-based Learning”

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Effective Online Engagement
Camille Brandt, Bemidji State University

student is a boxed term. but there are flavors; undergrad vs grad, what takeaways they are looking for, categories of students

ask for expectations, outcomes, and keep touching bases during class.

Vocaroo.com

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Grading Participation in an Online Course

Kerry Marrer, St. Cloud State University

Kate Mooney, St. Cloud State University

Kris Portz, St. Cloud State University

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What’s a FIG? Inquiring Minds Want to Know!

Miki Huntington, Minneapolis Community and Technical College

COP Community of Practice. Stipends – may be or not. May be only a book.

topics: online learning, academic technologies etc

offering support: to one another in a collaborative environment. Commenting to each other notes.

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ijco6s9bNBuD5_fYmrRTgKzubCXFM6GX

Malware, Phishing, Hacking, Ransomware

Keeping Safe in a Digital World

How Not to be Hacked

Malware, Phishing, Hacking, Ransomware – oh my! Learn about the threats to you, your users and your library.  During this session, we will explore the threats to online security and discuss solutions that can be implemented at any level. Most importantly, we will look at how we can educate our users on current threats and safety

Date: December 5th, 10AM

Presenter: Diana Silveira

Register: https://netforum.avectra.com/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?Site=SEFLIN&WebCode=EventDetail&evt_key=bec597af-02dd-41a4-9b3a-afc42dc155e4

Webinar December 5, 2017 10 AM

  • create policies. e.g. changing psw routinely
  • USB blockers for public computers (public libraries). like skimmers on gas stations
  • do not use admin passwords
  • software and firmware updates.
  • policy for leaving employees
  • HTTP vs HTTPS
  • Cybersecurity KNowledge Quiz Pew research Center
    http://www.pewinternet.org/quiz/cybersecurity-knowledge/ 

diana@novarelibrary.com

slideshare.net/dee987

facebook.com/novarelibrary

twitter @Novarelibrary

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more on hacking in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hacker

PALS at CATT

Campus Academic Technology Teams Webinar:

Online Education Report:

https://mnscu.sharepoint.com/sites/SO-UG-Educational-Innovations/Shared%20Documents/CATTs/2017-11-28/Advancing%20Online%20Education%20-%20Full%20Report.pdf?slrid=9d6b319e-e02a-4000-c1b7-12461657a5be

PALS: Enhancing Library System Solutions

PALS is housed in Mankato, 40+ years, shared by all MnSCU institutions. smaller libraries with smaller staff benefit.

Funding: Centrally from the Chancellor Office and privately.

Ex Libris. Alma (management software) discovery software is Primo. Implementation from Sept 2017 to 2019

value-added services?  A valueadded service (VAS) is a popular telecommunications industry term for non-coreservices, or, in short, all services beyond standard voice calls and fax transmissions. However, it can be used in any service industry, for services available at little or no cost, to promote their primary business.

Value-added service – Wikipedia

The new library system: backroom processing: – acquisitions – resources management (phys + electr) – analytics / reports /APIs
fulfillment : circulation and ILL
Discovery (Primo)
– phys + electr
– institution, consortium, remote resources
advantanges:
Hosted apps
web-based staff interface (until now on Windows)
all in one vs four separate apps – staff efficiency, common services, student success?
electronic resource management
Electronic resource management (ERM) is the practices and techniques used by librarians and library staff to track the selection, acquisition, licensing, access, maintenance, usage, evaluation, retention, and de-selection of a library’s electronic information resources. These resources include, but are not limited to, electronic journalselectronic booksstreaming mediadatabasesdatasetsCD-ROMs, and computer softwarehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_resource_management
Primo – comprehensive discovery
one search point; phys + electr; integrated into central system; academic resources available in central index; analytics and reporting; library consortia
EZ Proxy – provides access to library resources off campus
Islandora – open source digital asset management solution tha preserves, manages, and provide access to docs, unique history (photos, publications); research, other resources
Islandora is considered for OER, link to course materials through D2L
Leganto – expensive ExLibris for D2L integration
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Thurs, Nov 30 – continuation from Tues, Nov 28
Islandora. open source digital assessment tool. STCC is using Islandora
Primo is the discovery tool for campus only w subscription. PALS does not fund Primo. PALS does it through state-wide dbases.
ILL of electronic resources among campuses; the new system is making it easier.
your comments about the new system making electronic resources more available : does it mean that I will not have to go through my campus ILL persona can “borrow” directly? or it is too optimistic to expect that?
 Stephen Kelly: Tim Anderson has shared with me some thoughts on how Islandora can assist with archiving Open Educational Resources (OERs), but could you comment further on that for the benefit of everyone on the call? Answer: safe place to save OER. Drupal-based front end. Customizable. What is the connection to Primo
Stephen Kelly: Could it facilitate easier sharing of resources between institutions? For instance, if an OER was created at one institution and uploaded to Islandora, could it easily be populated for every other institution to access the materials as well?
Piggybacking on Stephen Kelly: are the account permissions similar to the average social media tool, where faculty can decide how “wide” the permission of h/er OER product is? E.g. a blog or YouTube / Kaltura can have: private / unlisted / public levels. Does Islandora function the same?
ownership of the OER.
copyright can be placed on each screen.

intellectual property

When:  October 24, 2017    2:00-3:00pm
Where: Adobe Connect meeting:  https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/oercommunityconversations

Who: Karen Pikula, Psychology faculty, Central Lakes College, and Minnesota State OER Faculty Development Coordinator

Special Guest: Gary Hunter System Director for Intellectual Property

Questions?  

Feel free to contact Kimberly Johnson, Director of Faculty and Instructional Development at kimberly.johnson@minnstate.edu or Karen Pikula, Minnesota State OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at karen.pikula@minnstate.edu.

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notes from the webinar

Gary Hunter. copyright. movies, public performance rights, youtube videos. up

the compliance of the terms of service of the web site. Contract law. copyright law. system procedure – copyright clearance, clearing the copyright means using it without violating the copyright law.

clearing copyright:

  • determine if materials are or are not protected
  • use your own original materials
  • perform fair use analysis with fair use checklist to usitify use
  • use in compliance with sections 110 (1) & (2) of copyright act
  • use materials avaialble through an open or CC license
  • get permission (letter, email, subscription, license, etc.)

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html 

8 categories of copyright works

establishing copyright. eligibility requirements;

  • fixation
  • originality
  • minimal creativity

when these three criteria met, copyright arises automatically.

registering a copyright https://www.copyright.gov/ . $35. 70 years for individuals and 95 for corporations or 210 years

not protected by copyright

  • public domain (expired copyright/donated)
  • federal gov publications and web site info
  • works typically registered as a trademark
    • tag lines and slogans
      • just do it – nike 1988
      • got milk – 1993
  • math equations and formulas
  • recipes
  • blank forms
  • phone books

copyright holder exclusive rights

  1. make copies of the work
  2. prepare derivative works
  3. distribute copies
  4. perform the work – performing live (band concert); pre-record audio visual of the same items. DVD play of a movie is considered “performing”
  5. display the work

legality vs reality

legality – activity may be copyright infringement from a legal point of view.

reality – tolerated or ignored by the copyright holder for various reasons

limitations on copyright

  • fair use (#107). librarians use it a lot to copy. using copyright works in F2F teaching, scholarship, research and other non-profit ed purposes.
    1. criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, research

four factors to consider (not educational exception) ; it is a four part test to apply: 1. purpose and character if tge yse 2. nature of the copyirghted work (e.g. factual v creative) 3. amount
http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/docs/Fair_Use_Checklist1.pdf

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

fair use >> . transformation: 1. add / subtract from original 2. use for different purpose; >> parody songs – using enough of music and words to recognize the song, but not enough to it to be copyright infrigement. memes.

students’ use of copyrighted works. students may: use the entire copyrighted work but not publish openly

copyright act #110 (1) applies to F2F teaching.

copyright act #110 (2) applies to Hybrid/Online teaching. exception one digital copy can made and uploaded on D2L. reasonable and limited portions of dramatic musical or audiovisual works

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

personal use v public performance.

if people identifiable ask them to sign a media release form

plagiarism v copyright infringement.

Creative Commons (CC). search engine for content available through cc licenses. https://creativecommons.org/ CC BY – attribution needed; CC BY-SA may remix, tweak CC BY-ND can redistribute, but not alter CC BY-NC for non profit. CC BY-NC-SA

copyright questions

book chapters: one is a rule of thumb
PDF versions of the eassays textbook acceptable, if the students purchased it

music performance licenses: usually cover – educational activities on campus; ed activities at off-campus locations that are outreach

music licenses: BMI, ASCAP, SESAC

#201. Ownership of Copyright. Student ownership http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

MnSCU board policy 3.26 intellectual policy. part 4, subpart A: institutional works; scholarly works; personal works; student works. MnSCU board policy 3.27.1: copyright clearance.

Gary.Hunter@so.mnscu.edu

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=oer

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