Posts Tagged ‘webinar’

library support makerspaces

Make it at the Library: How Does Library Technology Support Makerspaces?

Wednesday, December 14, 2017, 1:00pm – 2:30pm, EST

The movement to help support the “maker” culture in libraries has grown and and is creating vibrant groups centered around the library in many communities. Beyond purchasing equipment and the tools necessary to produce objects, what does the library need to do to support these innovation spaces? How do traditional library services and information management support these communities and new tools? This session will explore how some of the most successful makerspaces were created and how they incorporate traditional library services. During this session, speakers from three institutions that have implemented makerspaces will discuss how they integrate traditional services into their maker initiatives. Here’s what they will be talking about:

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=makerspaces+library

pedagogical research elearning

What Does Recent Pedagogical Research Tell Us About eLearning Good Practice?

Many instructors indicate that they want their elearning teaching approaches to be evidence-based. Indeed, there are rich and varied sources of research being conducted on elearning good practices available in scholarly journals and government reports. However, few of us have time to keep up with these publications. In this session Christina Petersen will do some of that work for you. She summarize findings from recent government and university reports which review over 1,000 online learning studies. Additionally, she will summarize the findings from newly published articles from pedagogical journals with important information about good practices in online education. These practices address evidence-based methods for promoting student engagement in online courses, good practices for video production, and other topics related to online teaching. We will discuss the importance of all of these findings for your teaching.

Christina Petersen is an Education Program Specialist in the Center for Educational Innovation at the University of Minnesota where she partners with faculty and departments to help create and redesign courses and curriculum to promote maximal student learning. She facilitates a monthly Pedagogical Innovations Journal Club at the CEI. She has a PhD in Pharmacology and her teaching experience includes undergraduate courses in Pharmacology, and graduate courses in Higher Education pedagogy. Her teaching interests include integrating active learning into science courses, teaching in active learning classrooms, and evidence-based teaching practice. She is co-author of a soon-to-be-released book from Stylus, “A Guide to Teaching in Active Learning Classrooms”

View the eLearning Summit presentation

WebEx link for the webinar
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2016
Time: 2:00 p.m., Central Daylight Time (Chicago, GMT-05:00)
Session number: 805 333 130
Session Password: MNLC@2016

Teleconference information

To receive a call back, provide your phone number when you join the training session. Alternatively, you can call one of the following numbers and enter the access code:

Call-in toll-free number: 888-742-5095
(US) Call-in number: 619-377-3319
(US) Conference Code: 297 345 8873
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more on elearning in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=elearning

library signage

Please look on the bottom of this blog entry for more resources

Effective Library Signage: Tips, Tricks, & Best Practices Workshop
Mark Aaron Polger and Amy F. Stempler Item Number: 1541-9212

Effective Library Signage: Tips, Tricks, & Best Practices Workshop
A 90-minute workshop, Thursday, January 5, 2017, 2:30pm Eastern/1:30 Central/12:30 Mountain/11:30am PacificLibrary signage represents the first lines of communication between a library user and the library. Are you doing everything to ensure that your signage is user friendly and inviting? Although we have the best intentions, sometimes our signage can be punitive, contradictory, outdated, or passive aggressive.In this new workshop, Mark Aaron Polger and Amy F. Stempler, library professionals who’ve conducted a four yearlong study at the College of Staten Island, CUNY that involved an extensive signage audit and replacement project, will provide you with the top ten tips to follow when preparing new signage for your library. They will discuss what constitutes “bad” and “good” signage and the importance of developing a signage policy to ensure consistency in design and overall language. Other topics that will be addressed will be placement, ADA compliancy, branding, design, verbiage, and the use of images, language, and font. You’ll come out of this workshop with the best practices to assess your current signage and develop improved signage for your institution.Learning Outcomes

After participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Identify the best practices when developing new signage
  • Distinguish and follow the steps involved in coordinating a signage audit
  • Create a signage policy that is appropriate for your institution

About the Instructors

Mark Aaron Polger is the first year experience librarian and information literacy instructor at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York (CUNY). His responsibilities include promoting library services and resources to first year students and providing library instruction and information literacy classes. Polger’s research interests include library marketing, outreach, and user experience design. He has written and presented on topics ranging from library marketing strategies, faculty outreach, Information Literacy outreach, embedded librarianship, library jargon, and library signage. Polger holds a BA in Sociology from Concordia University, an MA in Sociology from the University of Waterloo, a B.Ed. in adult education from Brock University, and an MLIS from the University of Western Ontario. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Curriculum, Instruction, and the Science of Learning at SUNY University at Buffalo.

Amy F. Stempler is an associate professor in the library department at the College of Staten Island, CUNY, where she has worked since 2008. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree and Master’s Degree in History from The George Washington University and a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science Degree from the Pratt Institute. Stempler is currently the coordinator of library instruction, and has written on library signage, Jewish history, Judaica librarianship, and the role of archives in environmental history.


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more on signage for libraries:
Polger, M. A., & Stempler, A. F. (2014). Out with the Old, In with the New: Best Practices for Replacing Library Signage. Public Services Quarterly, 10(2), 67-95. doi:10.1080/15228959.2014.904210

authors’ thesis is that library signs are living documents

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d96086859%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Stempler, A. F., & Polger, M. A. (2013). Do You See the Signs? Evaluating Language, Branding, and Design in a Library Signage Audit. Public Services Quarterly, 9(2), 121-135. doi:10.1080/15228959.2013.785881

To be effective, signage must be consistent, concise, and free of jargon and punitive language.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d87666251%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

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more on the use of signage in the library in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=signage

flipped blended

Flipped/Blended/… Teaching/Learning: FridayLive! Collaborative Development Series

Presenters: 
Steve Gilbert,
 TLT Group
Beth Dailey, TLT Group
Dale Parker, Senior Faculty, Cambridge College
Penny Kuckkahn, Nicolet College, Instructional Designer
Robert Voelker-Morris, Faculty Technology Consultant, University of Oregon
Winona Hatcher, Instructional Designer, Augusta University

Date: 11/11/201616

Time: 1:30 PM ET pre session. 2:00 -3:00 PM ET Main event. 3:00 – 3:30 PM ET After thoughts

Description 

This is the third in our Flipped/Blended… Teaching/Learning Collaborative Development Series. Faculty considering the next steps toward flipping/blended..teaching/learning and instructional designers and design consultants will all find something of benefit from this series.

In the spring we explored what it means to flip a classroom and added to the flipped classroom toolkit.  Over the summer a team of instructional designers assisted a faculty member in designing a flipped lesson. This collaborative development process is the basis of the series. 

The third session in our series focuses on Phase 2: Develop the Plan and Identify Resources. Flipped/Blended Teaching/Learning and Integrating Technology Design Approach

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more on blended teaching and learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended

ALA on digital literacy

In the wake of NMC release regarding digital literacy, http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/10/25/nmc-on-digital-literacy/ (not coincidence, the author is active with NMC)

ALA is offering a webinar:
Rethinking Digital Literacy to Serve Library Staff and Users eCourse
Paul Signorelli Item Number: 1541-9124

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11469&zbrandid=4634&zidType=CH&zid=38811756&zsubscriberId=1026665847&zbdom=http://ala-publishing.informz.net

Asynchronous eCourse beginning November 14, 2016 and continuing for 5 weeks (includes an extension of 1 week for Thanksgiving)

Estimated Hours of Learning: 24
Certificate of Completion available upon request

Learning outcomes

After participating in this course, you will be able to:

  • incorporate ever-evolving definitions of digital literacy into learning opportunities
  • draw upon a variety of digital resources to create digital-learning opportunities
  • seek additional resources that you can use in your continuing efforts to keep up with new developments in digital literacy in libraries and other learning organizations

What is digital literacy? Do you know how you can foster digital literacy through formal and informal learning opportunities for your library staff and users?

Supporting digital literacy still remains an important part of library staff members’ work, but sometimes we struggle to agree on a simple, meaningful definition of the term. In this four-week eCourse, training/learning specialist Paul Signorelli will begin by exploring a variety of definitions, focusing on work by a few leading proponents of the need to foster digital literacy among people of all ages and backgrounds. He will explore a variety of digital-literacy resources – including case studies of how we creatively approach digital-literacy learning opportunities for library staff and users, and will explore a variety of digital tools that will help to encourage further understanding of this topic.

Now, who is ready to build their digital-literacy skills and help their users become digital literate as well?

eCourse Outline

Part 1: Digital Literacy: Initial Definitions and Explorations

  • An overview of various definitions of digital literacy
  • Several components of digital literacy
  • Exploring Doug Belshaw’s extensive work on defining and fostering digital literacy

Part 2: Digital Literacy: Crap Detection and Other Skills and Tools

  • Exploring Howard Rheingold’s approach to crap detection and other digital literacy/net literacy skills
  • Participation, collaboration, creativity, and experimentation as digital-literacy skills
  • Building our digital-literacy toolkit

Part 3: Digital Literacy in Learning

  • The varying digital literacy needs of our youngest students, of teens, and of adults
  • Exploring various online resources supporting our digital-literacy training-teaching-learning efforts
  • The myth of the digital native

Part 4: Fostering Digital Literacy: Creating Within a Digital Environment

  • Creating a framework to promote digital literacy
  • Designing workshops and other learning opportunities
  • Keeping up in an evolving digital literacy landscape

How this eCourse Works

The eCourse begins on Monday, November 14, 2016. Your participation will require approximately six hours a week, at times that fit your schedule. All activities take place on the website, and you will be expected to:

  • Read, listen to or view online content
  • Post to online discussion boards
  • Complete weekly assignments or activities

Instructor Paul Signorelli will monitor discussion boards regularly during the four-week period, lead group discussions, and will also answer individual questions. All interaction will take place on the eCourse site, which will be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It’s recommended that students log into the site on the first day of class or within a few days for an overview of the content and to begin the first lesson.

User Requirements

Participants will need regular access to a computer with an internet connection for online message boards participation, viewing online video, listening to streaming audio (mp3 files), and downloading and viewing PDFs and PowerPoint files. ALA Editions eCourses are fully compatible with Windows and MacOs.

About the Instructor

Paul Signorelli, co-author of Workplace Learning & Leadership with Lori Reed, is a San Francisco-based writer, trainer, presenter, and consultant exploring, fostering, and documenting innovations in learning. Having earned an MLIS through the University of North Texas (with an emphasis on online learning), he remains active in the American Library Association, the New Media Consortium (educational technology), and the Association for Talent Development (formerly the American Society for Training & Development).

My note: Finally ALA is addressing a huge gap. Namely, letting conservative librarians dress information literacy with the appearance of “digital literacy.”

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog:

instructional design librarian

Instructional Design Librarians #libraries #edtech #highered

http://www.scoop.it/t/blended-librarianship/p/4070053667/2016/10/04/blended-librarians-conversations-instr-design-librarians-libraries-edtech-highered

Thursday, October 13 at 3:00 pm EST with guest Joelle Pitts from Kansas State University Libraries.

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more on instructional design in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

tech practices for K12 educators and administrators

Free Webinar for K–12 Educators and Administrators to Cover Best Tech Practices

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/07/19/free-webinar-for-k12-educators-and-administrators-to-cover-best-tech-practices.aspx

Best Practices for Effective Curriculum Management (Vimeo)

PowerPoint Slides (PDF)

Attention: sponsored by itslearning (take information with a grain of salt)

The cloud-based learning platform itslearning will host a free tech webinar for K–12 educators and administrators at 1 p.m. EST (10 a.m. PST) Wednesday, July 27. The webinar, available on the itslearning website, will examine best practices in selecting and implementing learning technologies.

Implementation consultant Libby Lawrie will direct the webinar. She’s a former teacher and school administrator, and she frequently presents nationally on instructional technology and virtual education. She’s also a founding member of the International Association for K–12 Online Learning (iNACOL).

The webinar is designed to give education leaders the insight and tools they need to select the right tools for their tech situations. There are many products and choices out there, and Lawrie will provide strategies for choosing the best products and partners, as well as details about the discovery and implementation process. She will share insights and best practices from U.S. districts large and small.

While not mandatory, registration is recommended. Visit itslearning’s webinar site to sign up.

 

tech curriculum design

Dell and Microsoft sponsored.

Register for this complimentary webcast on July 19th to learn how your school or district can design a tech curriculum that matches the future needs of your students today.

During this interactive presentation, you’ll hear how Kennewick School District is giving its students a head start with access to modern tech tools they are likely to use in the real world. Find out how the right tech plan can enable innovative teaching and learning at your school.

Join us as Ron Cone, Kennewick School District CIO, shares:

  • How to design a tech curriculum that matches your students’ future career needs
  • Tips for selecting the right tech to support that curriculum
  • Managing the nuts and bolts of deploying and managing that tech
  • Assessing curriculum and student success

Register »

Thank you,

Linda Briggs
Senior Contributing Editor
THE Journal

Hyperconvergence

Hyperconvergence: Reducing Costs and Complexity in the Datacenter

http://event.on24.com/eventRegistration/EventLobbyServlet?target=lobby.jsp&eventid=1212965&sessionid=1&key=341C7C23B7933C61879C96A496363BE4&eventuserid=145761676

Sponsored By: Lenovo
This presentation will begin on Thursday, July 28, 2016 at 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time.

Audience members may arrive 15 minutes in advance of this time.

Public sector data centers have unprecedented challenges and opportunities, and tomorrow’s demands remain uncertain. We know stakeholders, students, and citizens are all demanding more (e.g. modern services, innovative applications, cost-cutting efficiency), putting even greater strain on an organization’s infrastructure and expertise. It’s up to IT to make it all happen, and there’s simply no “one size fits all” solution to optimize data center efficiency. But can hyperconvergence help?

 

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