Posts Tagged ‘XR extended reality’

Workshop on XR at NerComp 2019

XR mission possible from Plamen Miltenoff

https://events.educause.edu/special-topic-events/nercomp-annual-conference/2019/agenda/xr-mission-possible-separate-registration-is-required

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1giTtWQST4FkryY8XA8jJ04Ow8uI4wJiRoYo7I1Ot1U4/edit#

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1BArsT4T0y73Ez9X_ZtYpJrUYYJmsKso2IMk_cAOM55Q/edit?usp=sharing

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RMzYj2gzKClK-DJ5K7FIIVpUnr1563n7K52XmcpEgjQ/edit

 

LITAchat on XR

March 29th at 1pm Eastern/12pm Central

#LITAchat will discuss XR (eXtended Reality) in libraries.

Join our Twitter conversation about your approach to VR (Virtual Reality) AR (Augmented Reality) and MR (Mixed Reality) for library and campus purposes.

The @ala_lita twitter account will be moderating the chat.

Virtual Reality Health Risks

What Researchers Want Teachers to Know About Virtual Reality’s Health Risks

By Jenny Abamu     Feb 16, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-02-16-what-researchers-want-teachers-to-know-about-virtual-reality-s-health-risks

with Google ramping up sales of its Expeditions Kit, and Facebook giving away 500 free Oculus Rift headsets to schools in Arkansas, the number of teachers using VR tools in U.S. classrooms could jump to more than 15 percent by 2021, predicts Futuresource, a market research firm.

A recent study was done by Children and Virtual Reality, a collaboration between researchers, VR companies, universities and health organizations, found that using VR tools could have significant health impacts on children.

What the researchers found in the third phase of the study, published last October, was that usage of VR headsets could impact a child’s vision, balance and spatial awareness

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more on VR in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+health

VR training workers

I explored the inside of a human nose and it convinced me that the real business in VR isn’t gaming, it’s all about training workers

https://www.businessinsider.com/htc-vive-releases-headset-that-shows-the-future-of-vr-is-enterprise-2018-11

Rosalie Chan

  • On Thursday, virtual reality company HTC VIVE announced its new headset called the Vive Focus, which is aimed at enterprises.
  • It can be used for business collaboration, training and education, such as teaching medical students about sleep apnea, showing car designers how to fix and prototype a car, and conducting remote meetings in a 3D virtual space.

Although virtual reality is typically associated with consumers, such as for video gaming, the technology is increasingly being adopted for use in professional settings. VR and augmented reality are projected to grow to $162 billion by 2020, and more products are targeting enterprise use.

What makes this hardware significant is that it’s much simpler and more portable for customers to use, says Dan O’Brien, General Manager of the Americas at HTC VIVE (My note: so he said…). Other VR headsets that only developers may use might involve expensive hardware and require users to stay in one place.

VIVE Sync. This can be used to help employees collaborate with each other in a virtual space, especially when they work remotely. Each employee’s avatar can share ideas, show presentations, import images, show videos and more all in a 3D virtual space (My note: Second Life tried this; and failed; Do you have any NEW ideas, Dan?).

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

can XR help students learn

Giving Classroom Experiences (Like VR) More … Dimension

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/11/02/virtual-reality-other-3-d-tools-enhance-classroom-experiences

at a session on the umbrella concept of “mixed reality” (abbreviated XR) here Thursday, attendees had some questions for the panel’s VR/AR/XR evangelists: Can these tools help students learn? Can institutions with limited budgets pull off ambitious projects? Can skeptical faculty members be convinced to experiment with unfamiliar technology?

All four — one each from Florida International UniversityHamilton CollegeSyracuse University and Yale University — have just finished the first year of a joint research project commissioned by Educause and sponsored by Hewlett-Packard to investigate the potential for immersive technology to supplement and even transform classroom experiences.

Campus of the Future” report, written by Jeffrey Pomerantz

Yale has landed on a “hub model” for project development — instructors propose projects and partner with students with technological capabilities to tap into a centralized pool of equipment and funding. (My note: this is what I suggest in my Chapter 2 of Arnheim, Eliot & Rose (2012) Lib Guides)

Several panelists said they had already been getting started on mixed reality initiatives prior to the infusion of support from Educause and HP, which helped them settle on a direction

While 3-D printing might seem to lend itself more naturally to the hard sciences, Yale’s humanities departments have cottoned to the technology as a portal to answering tough philosophical questions.

institutions would be better served forgoing an early investment in hardware and instead gravitating toward free online products like UnityOrganon and You by Sharecare, all of which allow users to create 3-D experiences from their desktop computers.

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Campus of the Future” report, written by Jeffrey Pomerantz

https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2018/8/ers1805.pdf?la=en

XR technologies encompassing 3D simulations, modeling, and production.

This project sought to identify

  • current innovative uses of these 3D technologies,
  • how these uses are currently impacting teaching and learning, and
  • what this information can tell us about possible future uses for these technologies in higher education.

p. 5 Extended reality (XR) technologies, which encompass virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), are already having a dramatic impact on pedagogy in higher education. XR is a general term that covers a wide range of technologies along a continuum, with the real world at one end and fully immersive simulations at the other.

p. 6The Campus of the Future project was an exploratory evaluation of 3D technologies for instruction and research in higher education: VR, AR, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The project sought to identify interesting and novel uses of 3D technology

p. 7 HP would provide the hardware, and EDUCAUSE would provide the methodological expertise to conduct an evaluation research project investigating the potential uses of 3D technologies in higher education learning and research.

The institutions that participated in the Campus of the Future project were selected because they were already on the cutting edge of integrating 3D technology into pedagogy. These institutions were therefore not representative, nor were they intended to be representative, of the state of higher education in the United States. These institutions were selected precisely because they already had a set of use cases for 3D technology available for study

p. 9  At some institutions, the group participating in the project was an academic unit (e.g., the Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University; the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University). At these institutions, the 3D technology provided by HP was deployed for use more or less exclusively by students and faculty affiliated with the particular academic unit.

p. 10 definitions
there is not universal agreement on the definitions of these
terms or on the scope of these technologies. Also, all of these technologies
currently exist in an active marketplace and, as in many rapidly changing markets, there is a tendency for companies to invent neologisms around 3D technology.

A 3D scanner is not a single device but rather a combination of hardware and
software. There are generally two pieces of hardware: a laser scanner and a digital
camera. The laser scanner bounces laser beams off the surface of an object to
determine its shape and contours.

p. 11 definitions

Virtual reality means that the wearer is completely immersed in a computer
simulation. Several types of VR headsets are currently available, but all involve
a lightweight helmet with a display in front of the eyes (see figure 2). In some
cases, this display may simply be a smartphone (e.g., Google Cardboard); in other
cases, two displays—one for each eye—are integrated into the headset (e.g., HTC
Vive). Most commercially available VR rigs also include handheld controllers
that enable the user to interact with the simulation by moving the controllers
in space and clicking on finger triggers or buttons.

p. 12 definitions

Augmented reality provides an “overlay” of some type over the real world through
the use of a headset or even a smartphone.

In an active technology marketplace, there is a tendency for new terms to be
invented rapidly and for existing terms to be used loosely. This is currently
happening in the VR and AR market space. The HP VR rig and the HTC Vive
unit are marketed as being immersive, meaning that the user is fully immersed in
a simulation—virtual reality. Many currently available AR headsets, however, are
marketed not as AR but rather as MR (mixed reality). These MR headsets have a
display in front of the eyes as well as a pair of front-mounted cameras; they are
therefore capable of supporting both VR and AR functionality.

p. 13 Implementation

Technical difficulties.
Technical issues can generally be divided into two broad categories: hardware
problems and software problems. There is, of course, a common third category:
human error.

p. 15 the technology learning curve

The well-known diffusion of innovations theoretical framework articulates five
adopter categories: innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and
laggards. Everett M. Rogers, Diffusion of Innovations, 5th ed. (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2003).

It is also likely that staff in the campus IT unit or center for teaching and learning already know who (at least some of) these individuals are, since such faculty members are likely to already have had contact with these campus units.
Students may of course also be innovators and early adopters, and in fact
several participating institutions found that some of the most creative uses of 3D technology arose from student projects

p. 30  Zeynep Tufekci, in her book Twitter and Tear Gas

definition: There is no necessary distinction between AR and VR; indeed, much research
on the subject is based on a conception of a “virtuality continuum” from entirely
real to entirely virtual, where AR lies somewhere between those ends of the
spectrum.  Paul Milgram and Fumio Kishino, “A Taxonomy of Mixed Reality Visual Displays,” IEICE Transactions on Information Systems, vol. E77-D, no. 12 (1994); Steve Mann, “Through the Glass, Lightly,” IEEE Technology and Society Magazine 31, no. 3 (2012): 10–14.

For the future of 3D technology in higher education to be realized, that
technology must become as much a part of higher education as any technology:
the learning management system (LMS), the projector, the classroom. New
technologies and practices generally enter institutions of higher education as
initiatives. Several active learning classroom initiatives are currently under
way,36 for example, as well as a multi-institution open educational resources
(OER) degree initiative.37

p. 32 Storytelling

Some scholars have argued that all human communication
is based on storytelling;41 certainly advertisers have long recognized that
storytelling makes for effective persuasion,42 and a growing body of research
shows that narrative is effective for teaching even topics that are not generally
thought of as having a natural story, for example, in the sciences.43

p. 33 accessibility

The experience of Gallaudet University highlights one of the most important
areas for development in 3D technology: accessibility for users with disabilities.

p. 34 instructional design

For that to be the case, 3D technologies must be incorporated into the
instructional design process for building and redesigning courses. And for that
to be the case, it is necessary for faculty and instructional designers to be familiar
with the capabilities of 3D technologies. And for that to be the case, it may
not be necessary but would certainly be helpful for instructional designers to
collaborate closely with the staff in campus IT units who support and maintain
this hardware.

Every institution of higher
education has a slightly different organizational structure, of course, but these
two campus units are often siloed. This siloing may lead to considerable friction
in conducting the most basic organizational tasks, such as setting up meetings
and apportioning responsibilities for shared tasks. Nevertheless, IT units and
centers for teaching and learning are almost compelled to collaborate in order
to support faculty who want to integrate 3D technology into their teaching. It
is necessary to bring the instructional design expertise of a center for teaching
and learning to bear on integrating 3D technology into an instructor’s teaching (My note: and where does this place SCSU?) Therefore,
one of the most critical areas in which IT units and centers for teaching and
learning can collaborate is in assisting instructors to develop this integration
and to develop learning objects that use 3D technology. p. 35 For 3D technology to really gain traction in higher education, it will need to be easier for instructors to deploy without such a large support team.

p. 35 Sites such as Thingiverse, Sketchfab, and Google Poly are libraries of freely
available, user-created 3D models.

ClassVR is a tool that enables the simultaneous delivery of a simulation to
multiple headsets, though the simulation itself may still be single-user.

p. 37 data management:

An institutional repository is a collection of an institution’s intellectual output, often consisting of preprint journal articles and conference papers and the data sets behind them.49 An
institutional repository is often maintained by either the library or a partnership
between the library and the campus IT unit. An institutional repository therefore has the advantage of the long-term curatorial approach of librarianship combined with the systematic backup management of the IT unit. (My note: leaves me wonder where does this put SCSU)

Sharing data sets is critical for collaboration and increasingly the default for
scholarship. Data is as much a product of scholarship as publications, and there
is a growing sentiment among scholars that it should therefore be made public.50

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+definition

Vendors for VR

LITA discussions on vendors for VR in academia

At WMU, the Libraries is partnering with our central OIT to host a VR lab in the main library.  My partnering co-director, Kevin, is really the subject matter expert but I’m managing a lot of the day-to-day operations.  Kevin is programming and experimenting with all kinds of hardware but we decided to use Oculus Rifts in our lab primarily because of the greater durability of the hand controllers (compared especially to the Vive).  We’re getting all of our games through the Oculus store and have plans to expand into Steam or another provider but haven’t done so yet.  We currently have 40+ titles available for gaming and educational purposes.  We also teach content creation using Unity, Maya, Blender, and a handful of other tools.

https://wmich.edu/vr and https://wmich.edu/library/services/vr

Happy to provide more information but hopefully this gives you a good start.
Best wishes,
Scooter

Scott Russell, Director of IT Services
University Libraries, Western Michigan University

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

VR resurgence

vr seasickness nauseaState’s universities envision VR resurgence

Chris O’Malley

https://indianapolis.crains.com/article/news/state%E2%80%99s-universities-envision-vr-resurgence

why the sudden interest in VR and AR after years of hype that failed to live up to expectations?

Heather Bellini, of Goldman Sachs Research, noted in a report last year that faster microprocessors and more powerful graphics cards have allowed more images per second to be delivered since the industry’s potential was hyped a decade ago.

There have also been advancements in AR gear, like glasses that allow vision of the real world but also have data or graphical images projected onto part of the glass.

As such, Goldman Sachs is projecting VR and AR to become an $80 billion market by 2025 – roughly equivalent to the size of the current PC market.

he big problems with VR is “motion to photon latency,” which is the time it takes to turn your head and the screen to refresh at the same rate.

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more on XR in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=extended+reality

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+education

SCSU at 2018 LITA Library Technology Forum

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On behalf of the 2018 LITA Library Technology Forum Committee, I am pleased to notify you that your proposal, “Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) for Library Orientation: A Scalable Approach to Implementing VR/AR/MR in Education”, has been accepted for presentation at the 2018 LITA Library Technology Forum in Minneapolis, Minnesota (November 8-10).
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Mark Gill and Plamen Miltenoff will participate in a round table discussion Friday. November 9, 3:30PM at Haytt Regency, Minneapolis, MN. We will stream live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/

SCSU Augmented Reality Library Tour from Plamen Miltenoff

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Notes from the Forum

Risk and Reward: Public Interest and the Public Good at the Intersection of Law, Tech, and Libraries

https://thatandromeda.github.io/forum18_schedule/

Blog: Copyright Librarian; Twitter: @CopyrightLibn

U of MN has a person, whose entire job is to read and negotiate contracts with vendors. No resources, not comfortable to negotiate contracts and vendors use this.

If you can’t open it, you don’t own it. if it is not ours… we don’t get what we don’t ask for.

libraries are now developing plenty, but if something is brought in, so stop analytics over people. Google Analytics collects data, which is very valuable for students. bring coherent rink of services around students and show money saving. it is not possible to make a number of copyright savings. collecting such data must be in the library, not outside. Data that is collected, will be put to use. Data that is collected, will be put to uses that challenge library values. Data puts people at risk. anonymized data is not anonymous. rethink our relationship to data. data sensitivity is contextual.

stop requiring MLSs for a lot of position. not PhDs in English, but people with specific skills.

perspective taking does not help you understand what others want.  connection to tech. user testing – personas (imagining one’s perspective). we need to ask, better employ the people we want to understand. in regard of this, our profession is worse then other professions.

pay more is important to restore value of the profession.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lLHP2TZnmrRodSdulPPOruEeF20iwF5zw6h5aOV8ogg/edit

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Library System Migrations: Issues and Solutions 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=109w_NU3zki_A6Fukpa50zzGJdgazbVSKqf7zAoYaKsc

from Sierra to Alma. SFX. number of challenges

Stanford – Folio, Cornell, Duke and several others. https://www.folio.org/ Alma too locked up for Stanford.

Easy Proxy for Alma Primo

Voyager to OCLC. Archive space from in-house to vendor. Migration

Polaris, payments, scheduling, PC sign up.  Symphony, but discussing migration to Polaris to share ILS. COntent Diem. EasyProxy, from Millenium no Discovery Layer to Koha and EDS. ILL.

WMS to Alma. Illinois State – CARLY – from Voyager to Alma Primo. COntent Diem, Dynex to Koha.

Princeton: Voyager, migrating Alma and FOlio. Ex Libris. Finances migrate to PeopleSoft. SFX. Intota

RFPs – Request for Proposals stage. cloud and self-hosted bid.

Data Preparation. all data is standard, consistent. divorce package for vendors (preparing data to be exported (~10K). the less to migrate, the better, so prioritize chunks of data (clean up the data)

Data. overwhelming for the non-tech services. so a story is welcome. Design and Admin background, not librarian background, big picture, being not a librarian helps not stuck with the manusha (particular records)

teams and committees – how to compile a great team. who makes the decision. ORCHID integration. Blog or OneNote place to share information. touch base with everyone before they come to the meeting. the preplanning makes large meetings more productive.

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Using Design Thinking — Do we really want a makerspace? 

makerbot replicator 3d printer

one touch studio 4 ready record studio. data analytics + several rooms to schedule.

lighting turned on when USB drive inserted.

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Article Shortcuts 

2:30 – 2:50

Talk To the Phone (Because the Human Is Overwhelmed) 

Google physical web beacons, NFC lables, QR codes, Augmented Reality. magnetic position. nearby navigations

 

ELI Online Event XR

ELI Online Event | eXtended Reality (XR): How AR, VR, and MR Are Extending Learning Opportunities

May 22 and 24, 2018 | 12:00 noon – 3:35 p.m. ET

https://events.educause.edu/eli/focus-sessions/2018/extended-reality-xr-how-ar-vr-and-mr-are-extending-learning-opportunities

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23elifocus #elifocus

https://www.educause.edu/badging

Over the past year, interest in eXtended reality (XR) technologies (such as virtual, augmented, immersive, and mixed reality) has surged. New and more affordable XR technologies, along with voice activation and sophisticated visual display walls, provide promising directions and opportunities to immerse learners in the curriculum, offering deeper and more vivid learning experiences and extending the learning environment. But what’s the curricular reality with respect to these technologies? What is hype and what is substance? Specifically:

  • What practical applications do “XR technologies” have for teaching, learning, and research?
  • How are these technologies being applied to engage learners as consumers and creators of XR experiences?
  • What evidence is there to support XR technologies as effective tools in the learning environment?
  • How can these technologies be integrated into learning spaces?
  • What are the ethical questions we should consider as we explore XR?