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lecture capture and online ed

From the Blended and Online Learning discussion list:

We’re working on a grant program at my unit to improve these lec-capture courses. One of the ways is to train faculty:

  •  We’ve seen that these courses have very little student engagement, especially for online students for whom this is the main medium of instruction. It’s challenging for the instructors to keep the online student in mind as they teach their lec-capture class. This is not surprising, since they’re essentially being asked to teach 2 different audiences simultaneously  – in class and online. However, given that this is not going to change in the near future for us, we’ve begun exploring ways to train faculty to do a better job given the constraints. Below are some ideas:
    • We are in the process of creating a sort of “checklist” to address things that can be done before, during, and after the class and ways of streamlining the process.
    • BEFORE
      • Make faculty familiar with the technology – do tours of rooms, tutorials, short workshops, etc.
      • Syllabus, Schedule and instructional materials are prepared before the semester begins.
      • Learning objectives, outcomes, and assessments are aligned and made transparent to the students.
      • Design pedagogy that is inclusive – for e.g., move discussions online, create groups that include in-class and online students, use language that directly addresses online students, etc.
    • DURING & at the END
      • Review a sampling of videos at the beginning, middle, and end by ourselves and then with the faculty and provide them feedback on the good, the bad, and the ugly – very discreetly. 🙂 It’s going to be a sort of a joint reflection on the class. We believe if we do this a few times with the faculty, they’ll get the message and will make greater effort to include the online student in their instruction. And doing it 3 times will also make visible the changes and progress they make (or not)
      • We also plan to survey the students at the beginning, middle, and at the end of the semester and share the results with the faculty.

Chunking of videos includes preplanning and post production tasks. Faculty can be trained to script their lectures more, create lecture based on “topics” to make chunking and tagging easier. Need to focus on end user experience (online student).

These are some of the ideas. We plan to start implementing them this summer. I’ll share with you our progress. 🙂

Rema

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Rema Nilakanta, Ph.D.
Director of Design & Delivery|
Engineering-LAS Online Learning
1328 Howe Hall
515-294-9259 (office)
515-294-6184 (fax)
http://www.elo.iastate.edu

—————————-

On Wed, Jan 27, 2016 at 8:48 AM, Nilakanta, Rema [ELO] <rema@iastate.edu> wrote:

Good Morning!

Thank you all for filling out the survey on the use of lecture capture in higher education. I appreciate your time and interest in this subject.

Attached are the results. I’ve also provided an overview below. The main purpose of this survey was to get an overall idea of how lecture capture is used in HE. I was just curious to see if the way we use it is pretty much similar at other institutions. The finding was inconclusive. My next step is to dig a little deeper – perhaps repurpose this survey for faculty and students. The final goal is to improve these courses – make them as pedagogically sound as possible, given that this technology is here to stay at our campus, at least for the near future. It will certainly require designing faculty training, but I would also like to explore innovative and efficient ways of chunking lecture videos pre and post production.

Let me know if you have any questions or need further information.

Rema

OVERVIEW OF “USE OF LECTURE CAPTURE IN HE” SURVEY RESULTS & FINDINGS

By Rema Nilakanta

rema@iastate.edu

I’ve listed some of the findings that impressed me. They do not follow the order of the questions in the survey. For details, please view the attached report.

Just a quick note – There were 39 respondents, but not all responded to every question. The respondents included instructional and IT support staff and administrators at all levels generally from 4-year public and private universities.

FINDINGS & THEMES

  • Echo 365 and Panopto are the most frequently used lecture capture systems, but Adobe Connect also has several users.
  • The computer screen and the instructor feed are most commonly captured (89% and 79%, respectively). However, some also capture the document camera, the whiteboard, and the graphics pen tablet (53%, 39%, and 32%, respectively).
  • Almost every one (97%) report that they support their recordings with additional course materials in an LMS, while many also use web conferencing to deliver lectures and hold office hours. A sizeable portion of respondents also use online textbooks and publisher sites in their course delivery. Only 18% use lecture capture as the primary means of course delivery.
  • The majority of respondents use full class recordings of an hour or more, while around half also use short segments of 20 minutes or less.
  • The majority of the respondents seem to indicate a campus wide use of lecture capture for different purposes:

o   review of in-class lectures

o   training and advising

o   student presentations (students use the technology to create their presentations/demos/assignments)

o   live streaming of seminars and on-site hosting of conferences for remote students and audiences.

  • Size of the support units ranged from 1 person to 150+ people spread across campus.
  • Similarly, there was a wide range for the number of courses that used lecture capture – as few as 1-2 to a 1000 and more, if one takes into account non-traditional uses.
  • Although the numbers show that a majority (77%) provide full IT support for their lecture capture systems, a closer look at the comments indicates there is a general tendency toward making faculty more self reliant by providing them support when requested, or providing them with fully equipped and automated rooms, personal capture solutions and/or training.
  • Majority seemed satisfied with the lecture capture setup, so did the students.  However, it seemed that the knowledge about student satisfaction was more anecdotal than formal. Other observations include:

o   For people satisfied with the setup, there were quite a few users of Echo 360 and Panopto.

o   Panopto seemed to rise above the rest for its promptness and quality of service. Mediasite got mixed response.

o   There seems to be an awareness of the need to get the lectures captioned.

o   Along with automated lecture capture technology, there seems to be a rise in old ways of doing things – manual (human) recording of events continues and seems preferable, especially in the face of rising costs of lecture capture technology.

  • The top 5 challenges concerning faculty support can be summarized as follows:

o   Training faculty to use the technology – turn on the mic, no recording of white board, do not change settings, take time to learn the technology.

o   Funding and support

o   Ensuring best practices

o   Captioning

o   IP concerns

  • Efforts to address these challenges were related to:

OPERATIONS

–       Keep mic on all the time

–       Use of media asset management systems, like Kaltura (MediaSite)

–       Admins trained to check settings for rooms

–       Disable download of recordings as default setting (addressed IP concerns)

TRAINING

–       Create user groups around technologies

–       Promote communication among instructors using a particular room

–       Training of faculty by instructional design teams on the use of technology and best practices

 

here is more on lecture capture in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=lecture+capture&submit=Search

Google Expeditions on VR Tours

Google Expeditions Takes Students on VR Tours of Great Barrier Reef, Buckingham Palace

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/01/20/google-expeditions-takes-students-on-vr-tours-of-great-barrier-reef-buckingham-palace.aspx

Sign in here: https://www.google.com/edu/expeditions/. A minimum of 6 interested teachers. In order to take as many students as possible on an Expedition, we’ll visit schools showing the most interest first.

Here is a taste of what lies ahead:

When viewing on a mobile phone, the user can change the point of view of the video fluidly in 360 degrees simply by moving the device around.

immersive journalism, games, and empathy

Virtual reality breathes life into immersive storytelling

http://www.hypergridbusiness.com/2015/01/virtual-reality-breathes-life-into-immersive-storytelling/

Virtual Games Try To Generate Real Empathy For Faraway Conflict

James Delahoussaye

Project Syria, a virtual reality experience built by a team of students at USC.

“I sometimes call virtual reality an empathy generator,” she says. “It’s astonishing to me. People all of a sudden connect to the characters in a way that they don’t when they’ve read about it in the newspaper or watched it on TV.”

What Peña’s doing — using virtual reality in combination with reporting — is part of a wider landscape of video games being created to explore the news. And they’re called, appropriately enough, “newsgames.”

“There’s an argument to be made that games are perfect at getting at the systemic problems and challenges in the world,” says Ian Bogost, a professor at Georgia Tech.

He says games are really good at showing the complex underbelly of stories.

Take a game that he helped make called Oil God. In the game, the player controls an oil-rich region, waging wars and inciting coupes. The player learns that oil prices are contingent on all sorts of factors rarely mentioned in a story about the price of a gallon of gas.

The Sociology of Videogames

http://sociologyofvideogames.com/2015/01/25/can-video-games-create-empathy-and-awareness-for-real-world-issues/

creating games to bring awareness to social issues for over a decade.  The game to create the biggest waves was arguably MTV’s “Darfur is Dying” released online in 2006, in which players took up the role of a family displaced by conflict in Darfur.

MediaSpace Lecture Capture

[technology] MnSCU Special Interest Group – New October Webinar – Leveraging MnSCU MediaSpace Through Integration With Cloud-based Lecture Capture

Join us next Tuesday, October 27th from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM, for a special SIG Series webinar: Leveraging MnSCU MediaSpace Through Integration With Cloud-based Lecture Capture

Are you looking for a more affordable and sustainable way to capture classroom lectures?  Or perhaps that is not even an option due to the on-going costs. Riverland recently replaced its Echo360 system by paring AV-to-IP encoders/decoders with a centrally located array of capture devices, which are integrated with MnSCU MediaSpace. This eliminates the need for a dedicated capture device in each room, as well as the on-going licensing costs of proprietary lecture capture systems. Join us as J.C. Turner shows us how the system works and how you can add this to your campus.

J.C. Turner, Ph.D., is the Director of Instructional Technology and Intellectual Property at Riverland Community College. He has more than 25 years of experience in higher ed, including 15 years of university teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels in electronic media, information and telecommunications, video production, and multimedia authoring. He oversees the library and Office of Instructional Technology, and serves as Riverland’s intellectual property officer and Quality Matters coordinator.

Register for the webinar at http://www.eventbrite.com/o/minnesota-online-quality-initiative-7290950883. Please forward this invitation to others on your campus who might be interested.

Photoshop series

Welcome to the Fall 2015 four-week series on Photoshop

where: Miller Center 205. Second floor on the East side (computer lab). Here is a virtual reality map:  

when: Today, Sept 3, Sept 10, Sept 17 and Sept 24. 11AM

who: anyone who would like to discuss and hands-on image processing techniques

BRING YOUR OWN PICTURES and have fun with us

Photoshop

Photoshop

 

Microsoft Azure

Microsoft Azure /ˈæʒər/ is a cloud computing platform and infrastructure, created by Microsoft, for building, deploying and managing applications and services through a global network of Microsoft-managed and Microsoft partner hosted datacenters. It provides both PaaS and IaaS services and supports many different programming languages, tools and frameworks, including both Microsoft-specific and third-party software and systems. Azure was announced in October 2008 and released on 1 February 2010 as Windows Azure, before being renamed to Microsoft Azure on 25 March 2014.[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Azure

Predictive Analytics and Azure Machine Learning

Predictive Analytics with Microsoft Azure Machine Learning

http://www.apress.com/9781484204467

From ASP.NET Site to Mobile App:

https://live360events.com/Events/Orlando-2015/Sessions/Tuesday/VST05-From-ASPNET-Site-to-Mobile-App-in-About-an-Hour.aspx

student evaluations

twitter post stud evals

A defense of student evaluations: They’re biased, misleading, and extremely useful.

The answer requires us to think about power. If you look hard at the structure of academia, you will see a lot of teachers who, in one way or another, lack power: adjuncts and term hires (a large population, and growing); untenured faculty (especially in universities like mine); faculty, even tenured faculty, in schools where budget cuts loom; graduate students, always and everywhere. You might see evaluations as instruments by which students, or administrators, exercise power over those vulnerable employees. But if you are a student, and especially if you are a student who cares what grades you get or who needs recommendations, then teachers, for you—even adjuncts and graduate teaching assistants—hold power.

Chairmen and deans also need to know when classroom teaching fails: when a professor makes catastrophically wrong assumptions as to what students already know, for example, or when students find a professor incomprehensible thanks to her thick Scottish accent. My note: indeed, when chairmen and deans KNOW what they are doing and are NOT using evaluations for their own power.

Student Course Evaluations Get An ‘F’ : NPR Ed : NPR

Philip Stark is the chairman of the statistics department at the University of California, Berkeley. “I’ve been teaching at Berkeley since 1988, and the reliance on teaching evaluations has always bothered me,” he says.

Stark is the co-author of “An Evaluation of Course Evaluations,” a new paper that explains some of the reasons why.

Michele Pellizzari, an economics professor at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, has a more serious claim: that course evaluations may in fact measure, and thus motivate, the opposite of good teaching. Here’s what he found. The better the professors were, as measured by their students’ grades in later classes, the lower their ratings from students.

“Show me your stuff,” Stark says. “Syllabi, handouts, exams, video recordings of class, samples of students’ work. Let me know how your students do when they graduate. That seems like a much more holistic appraisal than simply asking students what they think.”

LinkedIn groups

Are LinkedIn Groups Worth the Trouble? 17 Tips for Success

http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/2015/05/linkedin-group-tips/

LinkedIn

Use LinkedIn Groups not only as a way to distribute content, but also as a way to listen to our audience.

Any LinkedIn user can create a group in a matter of minutes. But it is crucial to lay a solid foundation to help ensure the group’s success. Some things to consider:

  • Develop a mission statement that distinctly outlines why the group exists to give a clear vision to both potential members and your brand.
  • Use targeted keywords in its title and to identify its category so the group can be found in organic search rankings.

More on LinkedIn in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=linkedin

 

Cheating Inadvertently

Cheating Inadvertently

http://chronicle.com/article/Cheating-Inadvertently/229883/

2001 article that illustrated nicely the challenge we face in helping students do their work with integrity.

the form of plagiarism continues into graduate school, where plagiarism remains, by far, the most common form of academic dishonesty.

the article repeats to a degree what is already known:

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/plagiarism/index.html

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/plagiarism/convocation2008.ppsx

namely, that plagiarism is in a much smaller degree intentional and to its largest percentage lack of systematic approach and clear directions by faculty toward students.

Rebecca Moore Howard, a professor of writing and rhetoric at Syracuse University, has called “patchwriting,” or borrowing large sentence structures and vocabularies from a source and only swapping out the occasional word or phrase with language of their own.

academic integrity represents an incredibly complex subject to master: It encompasses knowledge (What are the rules of academic integrity? How do they apply in this context?), skills (How do I summarize or paraphrase this passage without plagiarizing? How do I credit the work of others when I am collaborating with peers or using sources?), and values (Why does academic integrity matter? Why should I care about it?).

“Those who do not want to imitate anything, produce nothing.”
― Salvador Dalí

Gregory, S. (2015). Virtual World, Varsity Sport. Time, 185(12), 44.

http://time.com/3759634/virtual-world-varsity-sport/

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dmih%26AN%3d101753558%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Much like the way athletic-gear companies such as Nike and Adidas infiltrated traditional scholastic sports, video-game companies are helping underwrite the college gaming explosion. Riot Games, creator of League of Legends, is offering $360,000 in total scholarship money toplayers who make this year’s collegiate Final Four, more than tripling last year’s prize

My note: recommendation to LRS gaming committee. Can Eric be the LRS rep who can seek collecting an adhoc SCSU team? as per http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/19/recommendations-for-games-and-gaming-at-lrs/
If we to meet Dennis, Jim and/or Susantha, as recommended by Mark Vargas, the conversation needs to go that direction. Matt Barton definitely will be interested.
If we to consider the second and third higher level (how to gamify the educational process) or the educational methodology of gaming, I think we have to prepare the argument at LRS (as recommended by someone with a terminal degree in education or at least strong interest in pedagogy).

More on gaming at IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

more on gamification at IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

 

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