Searching for "GIS"

GIS geospatial

http://bootcamp.uspatial.umn.edu/

More on GIS and geospatial in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/04/gis-and-geoweb-technologies/

Summary

U-Spatial is pleased to announce the 2016 University of Minnesota Summer Spatial Boot Camp, an intensive, five-day geospatial workshop held on the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities campus from June 6th to 10th, 2016. Over the course of five days, participants will learn the fundamentals of Remote Sensing, GPS, LiDAR, Cartography, and more. Emphasis is on foundational skills in gathering, creating, managing, analyzing, and communicating spatial data. In addition to short courses, guest speakers will present on applications of geospatial tools and techniques.

Prerequisites

Working knowledge of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a prerequisite for admission to the workshop. In particular, familiarity with ArcGIS or comparable software packages is required.

Course Fees

The non-refundable participation fee for the entire workshop is $250.

Accommodation

U-Spatial has reserved a block of single-occupancy rooms in an on-campus dormitory at a rate of $46.95/night.

Timeline

Application opens: February 16, 2016

Application deadline: May 9, 2016*

Notification of acceptance: May 16, 2016

Course fee due: May 31, 2016

Workshop begins: June 6, 2016

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Analyzing and Presenting Spatial Data

http://www.dhtraining.org/hilt2016/course/spatial-data/

David McClureDigital Humanities Research Developer, Center for Interdisciplinary Digital ResearchStanford University Libraries

Description
This course will introduce students to a range of techniques for analyzing and presenting spatial data in the humanities. We’ll start with a survey of popular GUI-based tools (Neatline, Google Fusion Tables, CartoDB, QGIS, etc), exploring both their capabilities and their limitations. Motivated by the gaps in existing software, the last part of the course will consist of a basic introduction to web map programming in the browser, making use of popular open-source libraries like Leaflet, d3, and Turf.js. Along the way, we’ll touch on the basic concepts needed to get up and running with front-end software development – HTML, CSS, Javascript, and more. This course is designed for enthusiastic beginners who are looking to learn about new tools and and get started with the basic skills needed to create custom GIS applications. No previous programming experience is required.

GIS and GeoWeb Technologies

https://www.libraryjuiceacademy.com/moodle/login/index.php

Eva Dodsworth

Since the emergence of easily accessible dynamic online mapping tools, there has been a drastic increase in geographic interest and awareness. Whether for personal, social, professional or academic uses, people are using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to communicate information in a map format. Whether it’s using Google Earth to study urban change, or creating Google Map Mashups to deliver library resources, more and more members of society are turning to mapping programs for their visualization needs. With so many using GIS technology in their daily lives, library staff are now more than ever assisting library clients with their mapping queries.

This course will introduce students to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies such Google Earth and the creation of dynamic KML files; ArcGIS Online and webmap publishing; Google Fusion Tables and geocoding; and GIS fundamentals with geospatial data creation. Students will be able to apply their GIS skills in their reference work, in digitization projects, in webpages, in library instruction, and more.  Through hands-on exercises, pre-recorded demonstrations and lectures, students will receive a thorough overview of mapping resources that will enhance and expose their library’s resources.

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekOne_2014.wmv

 

http://www.placingliterature.com/map?modal=1

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekTwo.wmv

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part_One.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part2.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekFour.mov

 

– How to enable offline maps in your Google Maps app – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/map-happy/how-to-enable-offline-maps_b_6525832.html

– Huge news – Google Earth Pro, which used to cost the public $400 is now free! What does that mean for you? Extra features! You can import GIS files, tables, and export animated movie files!  http://google-latlong.blogspot.com.es/2015/01/google-earth-pro-is-now-free.html

– Don’t live in Canada?  Too bad! Google Maps plots best tobagonning hills in Canada!http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/google-map-plots-canada-s-best-tobogganing-hills-1.2218207

– a map of 19 countries that were named after specific people – http://www.vox.com/2015/2/1/7954179/map-countries-pe

 

Maps that shaped the world

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30840318

 

 

Content for Week Two – February 9th – February 15th

Week Two:

Podcast includes:

  • Citizen Mapping
  • OpenStreetMap – crowdsourcing
    more heads are better then one
    NYPL geomapping volunteers.

http://www.openstreetmap.org/

citizen crime reporting app for NYPD http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/crime_mapping/nyc_crime_map_introduction.shtml

when the jet disappeared, crowdsourcing for parts on the satellite maps of the ocean

potholes map

maps of the threes. emerald bug in Mnpls

http://www.fuf.net/

how does foursquare and checkins in FB and Google +fit it

  • Google Earth
  • Assignment

Podcast and Powerpoint can be accessed from:http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: Google Earth

Assignments:

1.       Discussion question:

Discover some citizen mapping projects that you are interested in OR

Contribute your local knowledge to Google Map Maker AND Share with the class online

2.       Google Earth Map

Please complete the tutorial and then create a map in Google Earth with the following components:

  • A title
  • A written introduction to your project
  • At least five placemarks, embedded with html tags, and images, if possible.
  • Imported KML file(s) file format by GEarth, but other apps is using it. using notepad or MS Word, one can create KML file.
    screen overlay, can be text, image, anything. legend. HTML code.
  • A screen overlay  (i.e. a legend)

areal photography.

history.
images from the library, Google is willing to buy them. citizen mapping. scanning and uploading.

geographical and societal awareness.

Gallery: 360Cities.

google street view – historical views

Google Earth Mapping

Submit online as a KML/KMZ file

I had the opportunity to experience a gizmo that can be used to display a variety of mapping projects, including citizen mapping: Science on a Sphere. It is a sphere on which you can project static maps or animations. The one I saw, in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s facility on Ford Island in Honolulu, displayed animations showing the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 tsunami in Japan, as well as airline flight paths, ocean currents, polar ice cap change over time, and many other types of geospatial data.

The Great Backyard Bird Count actually starts today and runs through Monday, February 16th. At a minimum, it only requires 15 minutes of observation on any or all the days:  http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Happy Cow is a site well-known to many vegetarians/vegans for finding restaurants which I’ve used when travelling. Users can submit reviews and/or restaurants that they’d like profiled (although the site reserves the right to approve or not the listing). http://www.happycow.net/search.html 

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wq and leaflet – a framework that could catch on
by Timothy Clarke – Thursday, February 12, 2015, 2:21 PM

One of the impediments to citizen mapping is the line-of-sight cell tower limitations of mobile phones, or the wifi requirements for other mobile devices.  Citizen mapping in urban and suburban environments is well-served by mobile devices, but what about natural areas, dense leaf cover, or extreme topography?  Even if obtaining absolute mapping coordinates isn’t the issue, much crowdsourcing assumes an ability to connect back to a central data repository (e.g., a web database, ‘the cloud’).  Equipment that can interact with GPS satellites and support data capture is typically expensive and generally requires proprietary software.

wq (https://wq.io/) is a framework that is ‘device first’ and ‘offline-enabled’.  It attempts to leverage several open source technologies to build an entire mobile solution that can support citizen science data collection work, and then synchronize with a central repository once the device (and operator) return to an area served by cellular or wifi networks.

I’m stretching here, so if I get stuff wrong, please don’t yell.  Still, I’ll take a pass at generally describing the framework and its related technology stack.

wq relies upon python, and a web framework called django for building offline-capable web apps that can run on iOS and Android devices.  These web apps, then, rely very heavily upon javascript, particularly requirejs (http://requirejs.org/) and mustache (https://mustache.github.io/), for the templates that permit quick and (somewhat) painless web application development.  Data visualization relies upon d3.js (http://d3js.org/), and geography makes heavy use of Leaflet (http://leafletjs.com/) — maybe the most pertinent layer of the stack for those of us in this course.  If you’re not familiar withLeaflet.js, check it out!

Finally, wq extends several other open source technologies to enable synchronizing between a central data repository and multiple mobile devices in the hands of citizen mappers.  Lastly, wq employs a set of tools to more easily build and distribute customized mapping apps that can be served from Apple’s app store, Google Play, etc.

What wq intends is to allow highly specialized citizen science/citizen mapping apps to be more easily and quickly built, based upon a solid collection of aligned F/OSS tools.  Ideally, an app can spin up quickly to respond to a particular need (e.g., a pipeline spill), or a specialized audience (the run up to a public comment period for a development project), or even something like a high school field trip or higher ed service learning project.

Some examples of citizen mapping projects already built upon wq are here:

https://wq.io/examples/

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Creating a walking tour map with Google Earth_2014

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Week 3

Podcast includes:

  • Geocoding
  • Georeferencing
  • Spatial Data Formats
  • Geospatial Data Online
  • Discussion Question

Podcast and Powerpoint available from: http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: BatchGeo (optional); Google Fusion (optional)

https://en.batchgeo.com/

enter Xcel data, and export KLM file ready for google map and/or google earth

https://support.google.com/fusiontables/answer/2571232
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fusion_Tables

store maps online, no latitude needed.
visualize geospatial data by map
spatial analysis by mapping different layers together
showing data by map, graph or chart
e.g. how many cars cross specific point
crowdsourcing: spotting butterflies, using fusion tables to map the spices and sightings
http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2011/mar/31/deprivation-map-indices-multiple

students: journalism, history, geography.

Georeferencing (geocoding – data, geo referencing – image)
historical air maps or photos are much more useful when they are georeferenced.
Photos from different year is difficult to lay over one another without referencing. the only reference might be the river. usually reference the four corners, but sometimes river. Using GIS program to determine the longitute/latitude for each corner. sometimes only farmland and it is impossible

 

group registration for Minnesota Desire2Learn IGNITE 2014

Minnesota Desire2Learn IGNITE 2014

Friday, April 04, 2014 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Central Time)

If you are planning to attend the MN D2L Ignite event and would like to be considered for a group registration ($80) versus individual registration of $95, please share your intention as soon as possible: d2L@stcloudstate.edu

Follow us on Twitter: @scsutechinstruc #d2l
Follow the IMS blog: https://blo
g.stcloudstate.edu/ims
Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices

your q/s, our a/s: D2L course request issues for faculty nor registered as Instructor of Record

Q:
Good morning!

I am a new faculty member, in the Department of !!!!!!!!!. I have been waiting my teaching courses to be listed on D2L, but still I cannot see them. It’s maybe because I am still listed as “Staff” instead of “Professor.” Could you please check this out for me?

A:
Good morning !!!!!!

Please have directions from the IMS blog (keep in mind using it as FAQ regarding D2L) how to request D2L courses:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/09/d2l-course-request/

If you log into that dbase, you will see the following picture:

no classes available in the D2L request dbase

which means that you, your department [chair] and Records and Registration must enter you as the Instructor of Record (what you call “Professor”)
Only after that you will see in the above-mentioned dbase your name and you will be able to request your D2L course.
We are not able to do more on our side.
THank you and let me know, if more questions.
Plamen

your q/s, our a/s: students registered for class, but cannot see D2L course

questions and answers Q:
As of May XX 1130am my E services (with 11 students) show those names and their ID nmbrs below00XXXXX Doe, John
00XXXXX Doe, Jane

but their names are not on D2L classlist. My classlist shows only 9 names. The first day is tomorrow (21st).

A:  https://www5.stcloudstate.edu/its/activateaccount/default.asp   — both students need to activate their huskynet ids.  They will use their e-services info to log in and activate the account.  Once the account is activated, they should populate in D2L.  If they do it today, it is still possible they will show up in the classlist tomorrow.

Fake Video Audio and the Election

https://www.npr.org/2019/09/02/754415386/what-you-need-to-know-about-fake-video-audio-and-the-2020-election

deep fake: definition

What are “deepfakes?”

That’s the nickname given to computer-created artificial videos or other digital material in which images are combined to create new footage that depicts events that never actually happened. The term originates from the online message board Reddit.

One initial use of the fake videos was in amateur-created pornography, in which the faces of famous Hollywood actresses were digitally placed onto that of other performers to make it appear as though the stars themselves were performing.

How difficult is it to create fake media?

It can be done with specialized software, experts say, the same way that editing programs such as Photoshop have made it simpler to manipulate still images. And specialized software itself isn’t necessary for what have been dubbed “shallow fakes” or “cheap fakes.”

Researchers also say they are working on new ways to speed up systems aimed at helping establish when video or audio has been manipulated. But it’s been called a “cat and mouse” game in which there may seldom be exact parity between fabrication and detection.

At least one state has considered legislation that would outlaw distributing election-oriented fake videos.

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Note taking in classes

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/48902/digital-note-taking-strategies-that-deepen-student-thinking

Mueller and Oppenheimer’s (2014) “The Pen is Mightier than the Keyboard” as well as Carter, Greenberg and Walker’s (2016) “Effect of Computer Usage on Academic Performance.” claim that students in lecture-style courses perform worse on assessments when allowed to use devices for note taking.

However, none of these studies question the teaching methods used in the classes themselves or whether teachers are recognizing the power of digital devices for students to create, share, connect and discover information.

Digital Organization and Content Curation

Much like students understand the concept of binders, notebooks and notes in the physical world, they need a similar system in the digital one. Whether working with dividers and subjects in a tool like Notability or sections and pages in OneNote, students need to build vocabulary to support how they house their learning.

Tagging this way not only helps students stay organized, but it could also help them to examine trends across courses or even semesters.

As a doctoral student, I use OneNote. First, I create a new digital notebook each year. Inside that, I add sections for each term as well as my different courses. Finally, my notes get organized into individual pages within the sections. When I can recall the precise location where I put a particular set of notes, I navigate directly to that page. However, on the numerous occasions when an author, vocabulary term or concept seems familiar but I cannot recall the precise moment when I took notes, then the search function becomes critical.

Multimodal Notes

With most tools (Notability, OneNote, Evernote, etc.), students can not only capture typed and handwritten notes but also incorporate photos, audio and even video. These versatile capabilities allow students to customize their note taking process to meet their learning needs. Consider these possibilities:

  • Students may take notes on paper, add photos of those papers into a digital notebook, synthesize their thinking with audio or written notes, and then tag their digital notes for later retrieval.
  • Students might use audio syncing — a feature that records audio and then digitally syncs it with whatever the student writes or types — to capture the context of the class discussion or lecture. When reviewing their notes, students could click or tap on their notes and then jump directly to that point in the audio recording.
  • Teachers might provide students with their presentation slides or other note taking guides as PDF files. Now, students can focus on taking notes — using any modality — for synthesis, elaboration, reflection or analysis rather than in an attempt to capture content verbatim.

In 1949, neuropsychologist Donald Hebb famously wrote, “Neurons that fire together wire together.”

Concept Mapping

One of the powerful components of digital note taking is that the pages never end, and a full page isn’t an artificial barrier to limit thinking. Students can work on an infinitely expanding canvas to include as much information as they need. For example, concept mapping tools such as Coggle or Padlet allow students to create networks of ideas using text, links, images and even video without ever running out of room. (my note to John Eller – can we renew our 201-2013 discussion about pen vs computer concept mapping?)

Visible Thinking Routines

Visible Thinking routines, sets of questions designed by researchers at Harvard’s Project Zero, encourage thinking and support student inquiry.

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more on note taking in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=note+taking

Gestalt and Visual Communication

Gestalt principles in User Interface design.

How to become a master manipulator of Visual Communication.

Jan 16, 2018 Eleana Gkogka

https://medium.muz.li/gestalt-principles-in-ui-design-6b75a41e9965

Great designers understand the powerful role that psychology plays in visual perception. What happens when someone’s eye meets your design creations?

Gestalt (form, shape in German) is a group of visual perception principles developed by German psychologists in 1920s. It is built on the theory that “an organized whole, is perceived as greater than the sum of its parts”.

four key ideas:

Emergence

People tend to identify elements first in their general outlined form. Our brain recognizes a simple, well-defined object quicker than a detailed one.

Reification

People can recognize objects even when there are parts of them missing. Our brain matches what we see with familiar patterns stored in our memory and fills in the gaps.

Multi-Stability

People will often interpret ambiguous objects in more than one ways. Our brains will bounce back and forth between the alternatives seeking certainty. As a result, one view will become more dominant while the other one will get harder to see.

Invariance

People can recognise simple objects independently of their rotation, scale and translation. Our brain can perceive objects from different perspectives, despite their different appearance.

Proximity

Elements arranged close to each other are perceived as more related than those placed further apart. This way different elements are viewed mainly as a group rather than as individual elements.

the Common Region principle

A good Common Region example would be the card UI pattern; a well defined rectangular space with different bits of information presented as one. Banners and tables are good examples as well.

Similarity

Elements sharing similar visual characteristics are perceived to be more related than those not sharing similar characteristics.

We can use the principle of Similarity in navigation, links, buttons, headings, call to actions and more.

Closure

A group of elements are often perceived to be a single recognisable form or figure. The Closure also occurs when an object is incomplete, or parts of it are not enclosed.

We can use the Closure principle in Iconography, where simplicity helps with communicating meaning, swiftly and clearly.

Symmetry

Symmetrical elements tend to perceived as belonging together regardless of their distance, giving us a feeling of solidity and order.

It’s good to use Symmetry for portfolios, galleries, product displays, listings, navigation, banners, and any content-heavy page.

Continuation

Elements arranged in a line or a soft curve are perceived to be more related than those arranged randomly or in a harsh line.

The linear arrangement of rows and columns are good examples of Continuity. We can use them in menus and sub-menus, lists, product arrangements, carousels, services or process/progress displays.

Common Fate

Elements moving towards the same direction are perceived as more related than those moving in different directions, or not moving at all.

We can use the Common Fate principle in expandable menus, accordions, tool-tips, product sliders, parallax scrolls and swiping indicators.

User Interface Design isn’t all about pretty pixels and sparkly graphics. It’s mainly about communication, performance and convenience.

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more on ID in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

Educause 2020 IT issues survey

https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5155654/IT-Issues-2020?sguid=60122224

what i find most important:
Future IT Workforce: Deploying a broad array of modern recruitment, retention, and employment practices to develop a resilient IT talent pipeline for the institution

Digital Integrations: Ensuring system interoperability, scalability, and extensibility, as well as data integrity, security, standards, and governance, across multiple applications and platforms

Engaged Learning: Incorporating technologies that enable students to create content and engage in active learning in course curricula

Student Retention and Completion: Developing the capabilities and systems to incorporate artificial intelligence into student services to provide personalized, timely support

Administrative Simplification: Applying user-centered design, process improvement, and system reengineering to reduce redundant or unnecessary efforts and improve end-user experiences

Improved Enrollment: Using technology, data, and analytics to develop an inclusive and financially sustainable enrollment strategy to serve more and new learners by personalizing recruitment, enrollment, and learning experiences

Workforce of the Future: Using technology to develop curriculum, content, and learning experiences that prepare students for the evolving workforce

Holistic Student Success: Applying technology and data, including artificial intelligence, to understand and address the numerous contributors to student success, from finances to health and wellness to academic performance and degree planning (my note: this is what Christine Waisner, Mark Gill and Plamen Miltenoff are trying to do with their VR research)

Improved Teaching: Strengthening engagement among faculty, technologists, and researchers to achieve the true and expanding potential of technology to improve teaching

Student-Centric Higher Education: Creating a student-services ecosystem to support the entire student life cycle, from prospecting to enrollment, learning, job placement, alumni engagement, and continuing education

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