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Gestalt and Visual Communication

Gestalt principles in User Interface design.

How to become a master manipulator of Visual Communication.

Jan 16, 2018 Eleana Gkogka

https://medium.muz.li/gestalt-principles-in-ui-design-6b75a41e9965

Great designers understand the powerful role that psychology plays in visual perception. What happens when someone’s eye meets your design creations?

Gestalt (form, shape in German) is a group of visual perception principles developed by German psychologists in 1920s. It is built on the theory that “an organized whole, is perceived as greater than the sum of its parts”.

four key ideas:

Emergence

People tend to identify elements first in their general outlined form. Our brain recognizes a simple, well-defined object quicker than a detailed one.

Reification

People can recognize objects even when there are parts of them missing. Our brain matches what we see with familiar patterns stored in our memory and fills in the gaps.

Multi-Stability

People will often interpret ambiguous objects in more than one ways. Our brains will bounce back and forth between the alternatives seeking certainty. As a result, one view will become more dominant while the other one will get harder to see.

Invariance

People can recognise simple objects independently of their rotation, scale and translation. Our brain can perceive objects from different perspectives, despite their different appearance.

Proximity

Elements arranged close to each other are perceived as more related than those placed further apart. This way different elements are viewed mainly as a group rather than as individual elements.

the Common Region principle

A good Common Region example would be the card UI pattern; a well defined rectangular space with different bits of information presented as one. Banners and tables are good examples as well.

Similarity

Elements sharing similar visual characteristics are perceived to be more related than those not sharing similar characteristics.

We can use the principle of Similarity in navigation, links, buttons, headings, call to actions and more.

Closure

A group of elements are often perceived to be a single recognisable form or figure. The Closure also occurs when an object is incomplete, or parts of it are not enclosed.

We can use the Closure principle in Iconography, where simplicity helps with communicating meaning, swiftly and clearly.

Symmetry

Symmetrical elements tend to perceived as belonging together regardless of their distance, giving us a feeling of solidity and order.

It’s good to use Symmetry for portfolios, galleries, product displays, listings, navigation, banners, and any content-heavy page.

Continuation

Elements arranged in a line or a soft curve are perceived to be more related than those arranged randomly or in a harsh line.

The linear arrangement of rows and columns are good examples of Continuity. We can use them in menus and sub-menus, lists, product arrangements, carousels, services or process/progress displays.

Common Fate

Elements moving towards the same direction are perceived as more related than those moving in different directions, or not moving at all.

We can use the Common Fate principle in expandable menus, accordions, tool-tips, product sliders, parallax scrolls and swiping indicators.

User Interface Design isn’t all about pretty pixels and sparkly graphics. It’s mainly about communication, performance and convenience.

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more on ID in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

Educause 2020 IT issues survey

https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5155654/IT-Issues-2020?sguid=60122224

what i find most important:
Future IT Workforce: Deploying a broad array of modern recruitment, retention, and employment practices to develop a resilient IT talent pipeline for the institution

Digital Integrations: Ensuring system interoperability, scalability, and extensibility, as well as data integrity, security, standards, and governance, across multiple applications and platforms

Engaged Learning: Incorporating technologies that enable students to create content and engage in active learning in course curricula

Student Retention and Completion: Developing the capabilities and systems to incorporate artificial intelligence into student services to provide personalized, timely support

Administrative Simplification: Applying user-centered design, process improvement, and system reengineering to reduce redundant or unnecessary efforts and improve end-user experiences

Improved Enrollment: Using technology, data, and analytics to develop an inclusive and financially sustainable enrollment strategy to serve more and new learners by personalizing recruitment, enrollment, and learning experiences

Workforce of the Future: Using technology to develop curriculum, content, and learning experiences that prepare students for the evolving workforce

Holistic Student Success: Applying technology and data, including artificial intelligence, to understand and address the numerous contributors to student success, from finances to health and wellness to academic performance and degree planning (my note: this is what Christine Waisner, Mark Gill and Plamen Miltenoff are trying to do with their VR research)

Improved Teaching: Strengthening engagement among faculty, technologists, and researchers to achieve the true and expanding potential of technology to improve teaching

Student-Centric Higher Education: Creating a student-services ecosystem to support the entire student life cycle, from prospecting to enrollment, learning, job placement, alumni engagement, and continuing education

AR in the classroom

Getting Started with Augmented Reality in the Classroom

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more on AR and learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=augmented+reality+learning

VR in higher ed

Early Adopters Pioneer Virtual Reality Use in Higher Education

Colleges deliver personalized learning experiences with custom VR content
by Erin Brereton
https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2019/08/early-adopters-pioneer-virtual-reality-use-higher-education

Arizona State University used a grant to obtain 140 Mirage Solo headsets from Lenovo. Just over one third of students have elected to receive one, at no cost, since the program piloted their use in 2018. Alternately, students can view simulations on a computer or a Google Daydream device

A lot of people wear corrective lenses. Designers may need to start thinking about how the devices accommodate glasses.”

For some disciplines and pedagogical objectives, VR experiences may not be readily available, says Dr. Matthew Bramlet, pediatric cardiologist and physician at OSF Children’s Hospital of Illinois, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria,

my note: Mark Gill, it seems similar to the WYSWYG interface you want to create:
To address that, U of I’s medical college developed its own content. Approximately 40 faculty members have created more than 250 VR lectures. The college provides access to Enduvo, a VR authoring tool Bramlet helped create, and lab space, featuring ceiling-mounted workstations equipped with HTC VIVE headsets powered by a variety of DellHP and other computers.
Martina, do you want to approach them and ask how willing they would be to share their learning objects for our nursing programs?

my note: Martina, do same – approach this program
Alice Butzlaff, an assistant professor with The Valley Foundation School of Nursing at San Jose State University, created original teaching exercises through a program sponsored by eCampus, a university resource that offers design and training assistance to help faculty integrate AR/VR technology, including workshops and demos of its HTC VIVE, Samsung Gear VR and other equipment.

My note: Martina

Reality Check

Keep these factors in mind when designing a campus VR lab.

Connectivity: On-campus and online students may have different considerations in order to stream VR content smoothly, so plan accordingly to ensure everyone has high-quality access.

Staff oversight: A program manager or faculty member can manage access to equipment, particularly if limited headsets are available.

Alternative options: Some users experience vertigo or “VR sickness,” says EDUCAUSE’s D. Christopher Brooks, so instructors should consider other ways they can participate in VR-based projects.

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more on VR in higher ed in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+education

Immersive Scholarship and Technologies in Academic Libraries

We define immersive scholarship as any scholarly work developed through or implemented utilizing technologies including Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, Visualization (i.e., large format displays and visualization walls, GIS, Tableau), and any related hardware, programs or software.

We are seeking survey participants who are employed in an academic library and who currently support immersive scholarship and technologies at their institution.

how your academic library has developed tools, implemented third party hardware/software, and in what barriers you have identified at your institution in supporting immersive scholarship.

Link to Online Survey

VR Antarctica

Kate Pound, a professor with St. Cloud State U did research in Antarctica: kspound@stcloudstate.edu 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Experience Sir Ed’s Antarctica…through virtual reality! Antarctic Heritage Trust is honoured to care for Sir Edmund Hillary’s Antarctic legacy. Over the 2016–2017 summer Antarctic Heritage Trust’s team on the Ice spent more than 5700 hours carefully restoring Hillary’s (TAE/IGY) Hut and conserving more than 500 artefacts. And now, as part of celebrating Sir Ed’s centenary, the Trust has partnered with Auckland University of Technology (AUT) to create a virtual reality experience based around the expedition base. The Trust is delighted to be giving people a glimpse into what life was like for Hillary and the men of his expedition on the ice. This fully immersive experience will be the closest thing possible to exploring the expedition’s base without actually going to the hut itself. The experience will be free and available at a range of locations across New Zealand as well as online. It is a ground-breaking project in terms of its scale and approach. Professor Barbara Bollard from AUT, who helped collect the data to build the virtual reality, says: “The experience is unique in that it allows you to experience special places without leaving a footprint. It opens up a long and rich history of Antarctic exploration to a wide audience who may never have the opportunity to visit in person.” Enjoy this brief teaser that showcases some of the graphic ‘look and feel’ of the experience, and look out for details to come on how you can experience Hillary’s Hut in virtual reality yourself. With thanks to project partner AUT, principal sponsor Ryman Healthcare Ltd, Antarctica New Zealand (logistics) and Staples VR (technical). #edmundhillary #antarctica #antarctic #antarcticadventure #expedition #conservation #antarcticlegacy #kiwilegend #scottbase #rossisland #explore #discover #southpole #virtualreality #virtualrealitytour #restoration #duluxpaint @staples_vr @antarctica.nz @duluxnz @autuni @rymancareers

A post shared by Antarctic Heritage (@antarcticheritage) on

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=vr+virtual+reality

Library 2.0 Emerging Technologies

third Library 2.019 mini-conference: “Emerging Technology,” which will be held online (and for free) on Wednesday, October 30th, from 12:00 – 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone).

Tomorrow’s technologies are shaping our world today, revolutionizing the way we live and learn. Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Blockchain, Internet of Things, Drones, Personalization, the Quantified Self. Libraries can and should be the epicenter of exploring, building and promoting these emerging techs, assuring the better futures and opportunities they offer are accessible to everyone. Learn what libraries are doing right now with these cutting-edge technologies, what they’re planning next and how you can implement these ideas in your own organization.

This is a free event, being held live online and also recorded.
REGISTER HERE

data driven education

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/45396/whats-at-risk-when-schools-focus-too-much-on-student-data

The U.S. Department of Education emphasizes “ensuring the use of multiple measures of school success based on academic outcomes, student progress, and school quality.”

starting to hear more about what might be lost when schools focus too much on data. Here are five arguments against the excesses of data-driven instruction.

1) Motivation (decrease)

as stereotype threat. threatening students’ sense of belonging, which is key to academic motivation.

2) Helicoptering

A style of overly involved “intrusive parenting” has been associated in studies with increased levels of anxiety and depression when students reach college.

3) Commercial Monitoring and Marketing

The National Education Policy Center releases annual reports on commercialization and marketing in public schools. In its most recent report in May, researchers there raised concerns about targeted marketing to students using computers for schoolwork and homework.

Companies like Google pledge not to track the content of schoolwork for the purposes of advertising. But in reality these boundaries can be a lot more porous.

4) Missing What Data Can’t Capture

5) Exposing Students’ “Permanent Records”

In the past few years several states have passed laws banning employers from looking at the credit reports of job applicants.
Similarly, for young people who get in trouble with the law, there is a procedure for sealing juvenile records
Educational transcripts, unlike credit reports or juvenile court records, are currently considered fair game for gatekeepers like colleges and employers. These records, though, are getting much more detailed.

mental health discussion

Mental health of college students and Lee’s new book: “Delivering College Mental Health”

Join Bryan Alexander and Lee Keyes, executive director, Counseling Center at the University of Alabama, and author of Delivering Effective College Mental Health Services for an engaging live discussion on the future of mental health in higher education.
Bryan plans to ask Lee about unfolding trends in college student mental health and his thoughts around the rise in anxiety and stress. We will explore how universities are changing their approaches to student mental health and what roles technology may play in harming or helping psychological well-being.
What questions or thoughts do you have? Join and take part in the discussion!
Registration at:
https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fr20.rs6.net%2Ftn.jsp%3Ff%3D001wXPq-Mkb9ES5TqzpnbEq_kE8DYDepBVxUtrTbcGYDFbe6_cOIQEoQzKZeib2iwvQo7Y9lihL0XiKmPtaTLRXrr1gre1whAiXvgD2bfQq3o-Jd1T6RzoyzExSt_bI0aj9yC9K9yVr8QInpBWvFenbP1Th9LMZSAqCkX3idDvYBhE%3D%26c%3DOm7NHut1tu3xr83fqUbt5JAnaIqgZKFevlP1Qo_Vjb9lkMuzoNtrGQ%3D%3D%26ch%3DI4n_tILQzz-C9RV93BjCwbBVsCY6gpKj7z26S8u5R0LkVD5ly36v6A%3D%3D&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7Cca88694f5230470d577c08d6da07f507%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=yzcl7mA4bjSJrPBm494qlCIFlt8Of3MYolRMoJnWbgE%3D&reserved=0
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My notes from the webinar:
we have to understand stress in America. steadily climbing, even if generations experience it differently. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/ 
Lee about “Mobile First” – like First Aid. Often by text and email. after Bryan asked how Adjuncts can deal with such situations, if
Counseling Centers need those additions.
Mobile First apps.
most crisis situations are a form of panic. if addressed quickly, one can prevent growing and turning into a major episode.
mindfulness can be different for the different type of issues of students.
libraries as the campus community center.
can be done on
conflation of immaturity and irresponsibility with stress and panic. Latter might be expressed in a way it is immature, but one has to meet them where they are, not judgement and denial, which will make it worse. Tough love will not help. Upholding classroom expectations and rules, but can be supportive at the same time. When pressed by time
Daniel Stanford De Paul. Cohort fundamentals of good teaching. instead of “fail safely”
https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/ it is expensive. local tailor made concept by local program. put together the same concept.
academic hazing hasn’t changed since medieval time. the trauma instructors starts their career with.

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break up Facebook

https://nyti.ms/2LzRzwq

Facebook’s board works more like an advisory committee than an overseer, because Mark controls around 60 percent of voting shares. Mark alone can decide how to configure Facebook’s algorithms to determine what people see in their News Feeds, what privacy settings they can use and even which messages get delivered. He sets the rules for how to distinguish violent and incendiary speech from the merely offensive, and he can choose to shut down a competitor by acquiring, blocking or copying it.

We are a nation with a tradition of reining in monopolies, no matter how well intentioned the leaders of these companies may be. Mark’s power is unprecedented and un-American.

It is time to break up Facebook.

America was built on the idea that power should not be concentrated in any one person, because we are all fallible. That’s why the founders created a system of checks and balances.

More legislation followed in the 20th century, creating legal and regulatory structures to promote competition and hold the biggest companies accountable.

Starting in the 1970s, a small but dedicated group of economists, lawyers and policymakers sowed the seeds of our cynicism. Over the next 40 years, they financed a network of think tanks, journals, social clubs, academic centers and media outlets to teach an emerging generation that private interests should take precedence over public ones. Their gospel was simple: “Free” markets are dynamic and productive, while government is bureaucratic and ineffective.

American industries, from airlines to pharmaceuticals, have experienced increased concentration, and the average size of public companies has tripled. The results are a decline in entrepreneurshipstalled productivity growth, and higher prices and fewer choices for consumers.

From our earliest days, Mark used the word “domination” to describe our ambitions, with no hint of irony or humility.

Facebook’s monopoly is also visible in its usage statistics. About 70 percent of American adults use social media, and a vast majority are on Facebook products. Over two-thirds use the core site, a third use Instagram, and a fifth use WhatsApp. By contrast, fewer than a third report using Pinterest, LinkedIn or Snapchat. What started out as lighthearted entertainment has become the primary way that people of all ages communicate online.

The F.T.C.’s biggest mistake was to allow Facebook to acquire Instagram and WhatsApp. In 2012, the newer platforms were nipping at Facebook’s heels because they had been built for the smartphone, where Facebook was still struggling to gain traction. Mark responded by buying them, and the F.T.C. approved.

The News Feed algorithm reportedly prioritized videos created through Facebook over videos from competitors, like YouTube and Vimeo. In 2012, Twitter introduced a video network called Vine that featured six-second videos. That same day, Facebook blocked Vine from hosting a tool that let its users search for their Facebook friends while on the new network. The decision hobbled Vine, which shut down four years later.

unlike Vine, Snapchat wasn’t interfacing with the Facebook ecosystem; there was no obvious way to handicap the company or shut it out. So Facebook simply copied it. (opyright law does not extend to the abstract concept itself.)

As markets become more concentrated, the number of new start-up businesses declines. This holds true in other high-tech areas dominated by single companies, like search (controlled by Google) and e-commerce (taken over by Amazon). Meanwhile, there has been plenty of innovation in areas where there is no monopolistic domination, such as in workplace productivity (Slack, Trello, Asana), urban transportation (Lyft, Uber, Lime, Bird) and cryptocurrency exchanges (Ripple, Coinbase, Circle).

The choice is mine, but it doesn’t feel like a choice. Facebook seeps into every corner of our lives to capture as much of our attention and data as possible and, without any alternative, we make the trade.

Just last month, Facebook seemingly tried to bury news that it had stored tens of millions of user passwords in plain text format, which thousands of Facebook employees could see. Competition alone wouldn’t necessarily spur privacy protection — regulation is required to ensure accountability — but Facebook’s lock on the market guarantees that users can’t protest by moving to alternative platforms.

Mark used to insist that Facebook was just a “social utility,” a neutral platform for people to communicate what they wished. Now he recognizes that Facebook is both a platform and a publisher and that it is inevitably making decisions about values. The company’s own lawyers have argued in court that Facebook is a publisher and thus entitled to First Amendment protection.

As if Facebook’s opaque algorithms weren’t enough, last year we learned that Facebook executives had permanently deleted their own messages from the platform, erasing them from the inboxes of recipients; the justification was corporate security concerns.

Mark may never have a boss, but he needs to have some check on his power. The American government needs to do two things: break up Facebook’s monopoly and regulate the company to make it more accountable to the American people.

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We Don’t Need Social Media

The push to regulate or break up Facebook ignores the fact that its services do more harm than good

Colin Horgan, May 13, 2019

https://onezero.medium.com/we-dont-need-social-media-53d5455f4f6b

Hughes joins a growing chorus of former Silicon Valley unicorn riders who’ve recently had second thoughts about the utility or benefit of the surveillance-attention economy their products and platforms have helped create. He is also not the first to suggest that government might need to step in to clean up the mess they made

Nick Srnicek, author of the book Platform Capitalism and a lecturer in digital economy at King’s College London, wrotelast month, “[I]t’s competition — not size — that demands more data, more attention, more engagement and more profits at all costs

 

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more on Facebook in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook

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