Searching for "academic library"

Immersive Scholarship and Technologies in Academic Libraries

We define immersive scholarship as any scholarly work developed through or implemented utilizing technologies including Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, Visualization (i.e., large format displays and visualization walls, GIS, Tableau), and any related hardware, programs or software.

We are seeking survey participants who are employed in an academic library and who currently support immersive scholarship and technologies at their institution.

how your academic library has developed tools, implemented third party hardware/software, and in what barriers you have identified at your institution in supporting immersive scholarship.

Link to Online Survey

Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer

What’s the Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer?

Research from the Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) has been transferred to EDUCAUSE, including a report on the role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer and its differences and similarities to other higher ed IT tech executives.

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/1/the-center-for-higher-education-cio-studies-reports-2003-2018 Friday, January 18, 2019

The Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) was a nonprofit organization founded by Dr. Wayne A. Brown, dedicated to the education and development of technology leaders in higher education. CHECS produced the CIO Study, the Technology Leadership (TL) Study, the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Study and the Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study.

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) study provides information about higher education CIOs’ attributes, education, experience and effectiveness. The CIO study was conducted from 2003 to 2018. Find all the CIO reports here.

The Technology Leadership (TL) study surveyed those in the next organizational layer down from the CIO.  The TL study examines the demographics of the TL, where they have worked, and the activities they are undertaking to prepare themselves to become CIOs.  The TL study was study was conducted from 2009 to 2018. Find all the TL reports here.

The Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) study examines the demographics of the higher education CISO, the career route they have taken to their role, and the activities and attributes needed for a CISO according to the CISO and the CIO. The CISO study was study was conducted from 2014 to 2017. Find all the CISO reports here.

The Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study, 2018 canvassed CIOs, known CATOs and academic technology leaders, as well as deans and provosts to understand changes happening across institutions of higher education in academic technology.

Library Technology Conference 2019

#LTC2019

Intro to XR in Libraries from Plamen Miltenoff

keynote: equitable access to information

keynote spaker

https://sched.co/JAqk
the type of data: wikipedia. the dangers of learning from wikipedia. how individuals can organize mitigate some of these dangers. wikidata, algorithms.
IBM Watson is using wikipedia by algorythms making sense, AI system
youtube videos debunked of conspiracy theories by using wikipedia.

semantic relatedness, Word2Vec
how does algorithms work: large body of unstructured text. picks specific words

lots of AI learns about the world from wikipedia. the neutral point of view policy. WIkipedia asks editors present as proportionally as possible. Wikipedia biases: 1. gender bias (only 20-30 % are women).

conceptnet. debias along different demographic dimensions.

citations analysis gives also an idea about biases. localness of sources cited in spatial articles. structural biases.

geolocation on Twitter by County. predicting the people living in urban areas. FB wants to push more local news.

danger (biases) #3. wikipedia search results vs wkipedia knowledge panel.

collective action against tech: Reddit, boycott for FB and Instagram.

Mechanical Turk https://www.mturk.com/  algorithmic / human intersection

data labor: what the primary resources this companies have. posts, images, reviews etc.

boycott, data strike (data not being available for algorithms in the future). GDPR in EU – all historical data is like the CA Consumer Privacy Act. One can do data strike without data boycott. general vs homogeneous (group with shared identity) boycott.

the wikipedia SPAM policy is obstructing new editors and that hit communities such as women.

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Twitter and Other Social Media: Supporting New Types of Research Materials

https://sched.co/JAWp

Nancy Herther Cody Hennesy

http://z.umn.edu/

twitter librarieshow to access at different levels. methods and methodological concerns. ethical concerns, legal concerns,

tweetdeck for advanced Twitter searches. quoting, likes is relevant, but not enough, sometimes screenshot

engagement option

social listening platforms: crimson hexagon, parsely, sysomos – not yet academic platforms, tools to setup queries and visualization, but difficult to algorythm, the data samples etc. open sources tools (Urbana, Social Media microscope: SMILE (social media intelligence and learning environment) to collect data from twitter, reddit and within the platform they can query Twitter. create trend analysis, sentiment analysis, Voxgov (subscription service: analyzing political social media)

graduate level and faculty research: accessing SM large scale data web scraping & APIs Twitter APIs. Jason script, Python etc. Gnip Firehose API ($) ; Web SCraper Chrome plugin (easy tool, Pyhon and R created); Twint (Twitter scraper)

Facepager (open source) if not Python or R coder. structure and download the data sets.

TAGS archiving google sheets, uses twitter API. anything older 7 days not avaialble, so harvest every week.

social feed manager (GWUniversity) – Justin Litman with Stanford. Install on server but allows much more.

legal concerns: copyright (public info, but not beyond copyrighted). fair use argument is strong, but cannot publish the data. can analyize under fair use. contracts supercede copyright (terms of service/use) licensed data through library.

methods: sampling concerns tufekci, 2014 questions for sm. SM data is a good set for SM, but other fields? not according to her. hashtag studies: self selection bias. twitter as a model organism: over-represnted data in academic studies.

methodological concerns: scope of access – lack of historical data. mechanics of platform and contenxt: retweets are not necessarily endorsements.

ethical concerns. public info – IRB no informed consent. the right to be forgotten. anonymized data is often still traceable.

table discussion: digital humanities, journalism interested, but too narrow. tools are still difficult to find an operate. context of the visuals. how to spread around variety of majors and classes. controversial events more likely to be deleted.

takedowns, lies and corrosion: what is a librarian to do: trolls, takedown,

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Crague Cook, Jay Ray

the pilot process. 2017. 3D printing, approaching and assessing success or failure.  https://collegepilot.wiscweb.wisc.edu/

development kit circulation. familiarity with the Oculus Rift resulted in lesser reservation. Downturn also.

An experience station. clean up free apps.

question: spherical video, video 360.

safety issues: policies? instructional perspective: curating,WI people: user testing. touch controllers more intuitive then xbox controller. Retail Oculus Rift

app Scatchfab. 3modelviewer. obj or sdl file. Medium, Tiltbrush.

College of Liberal Arts at the U has their VR, 3D print set up.
Penn State (Paul, librarian, kiniseology, anatomy programs), Information Science and Technology. immersive experiences lab for video 360.

CALIPHA part of it is xrlibraries. libraries equal education. content provider LifeLiqe STEM library of AR and VR objects. https://www.lifeliqe.com/

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Access for All:

https://sched.co/JAXn

accessibilityLeah Root

bloat code (e.g. cleaning up MS Word code)

ILLiad Doctype and Language declaration helps people with disabilities.

https://24ways.org/

 

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A Seat at the Table: Embedding the Library in Curriculum Development

https://sched.co/JAY5

embedded librarianembed library resources.

libraians, IT staff, IDs. help faculty with course design, primarily online, master courses. Concordia is GROWING, mostly because of online students.

solve issues (putting down fires, such as “gradebook” on BB). Librarians : research and resources experts. Librarians helping with LMS. Broadening definition of Library as support hub.

blockchain for academic libraries

An interesting discussion on the use of blockchain for academic libraries on the LITA listserv

in response to a request from the Library Association in Pakistan for an hour long session on “block chain and its applications for Academic Libraries”.

While Nathan Schwartz, MSIS Systems & Reference Librarian find blockchain only related to cryptocurrencies, Jason Griffey offers a MOOC focused on Blockchain for the Information Professions: https://ischoolblogs.sjsu.edu/blockchains/

According to Jason, “Blockchain, as a data storage technology, can be separated from the idea of cryptocurrencies and expressions of value and coin.”

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

suggestions for academic writing

these are suggestions from Google Groups with doctoral cohorts 6, 7, 8, 9 from the Ed leadership program

How to find a book from InterLibrary Loan: find book ILL

Citing someone else’s citation?:

http://library.northampton.ac.uk/liberation/ref/adv_harvard_else.php

http://guides.is.uwa.edu.au/c.php?g=380288&p=3109460
use them sparingly:
http://www.apastyle.org/learn/faqs/cite-another-source.aspx
Please take a look at “Paraphrasing sources: in
http://www.roanestate.edu/owl/usingsources_mla.html
it gives you a good idea why will distance you from a possibility of plagiarizing.
n example of resolution by this peer-reviewed journal article
https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i5.2566
Ungerer, L. M. (2016). Digital Curation as a Core Competency in Current Learning and Literacy: A Higher Education Perspective. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning17(5). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i5.2566
Dunaway (2011) suggests that learning landscapes in a digital age are networked, social, and technological. Since people commonly create and share information by collecting, filtering, and customizing digital content, educators should provide students opportunities to master these skills (Mills, 2013). In enhancing critical thinking, we have to investigate pedagogical models that consider students’ digital realities (Mihailidis & Cohen, 2013). November (as cited in Sharma & Deschaine, 2016), however warns that although the Web fulfils a pivotal role in societal media, students often are not guided on how to critically deal with the information that they access on the Web. Sharma and Deschaine (2016) further point out the potential for personalizing teaching and incorporating authentic material when educators themselves digitally curate resources by means of Web 2.0 tools.
p. 24. Communities of practice. Lave and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) concept of situated learning and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) idea of communities of practice highlight the importance of apprenticeship and the social role in learning.
criteria to publish a paper

Originality: Does the paper contain new and significant information adequate to justify publication?

Relationship to Literature: Does the paper demonstrate an adequate understanding of the relevant literature in the field and cite an appropriate range of literature sources? Is any significant work ignored?

Methodology: Is the paper’s argument built on an appropriate base of theory, concepts, or other ideas? Has the research or equivalent intellectual work on which the paper is based been well designed? Are the methods employed appropriate?

Results: Are results presented clearly and analyzed appropriately? Do the conclusions adequately tie together the other elements of the paper?

Implications for research, practice and/or society: Does the paper identify clearly any implications for research, practice and/or society? Does the paper bridge the gap between theory and practice? How can the research be used in practice (economic and commercial impact), in teaching, to influence public policy, in research (contributing to the body of knowledge)? What is the impact upon society (influencing public attitudes, affecting quality of life)? Are these implications consistent with the findings and conclusions of the paper?

Quality of Communication: Does the paper clearly express its case, measured against the technical language of the field and the expected knowledge of the journal’s readership? Has attention been paid to the clarity of expression and readability, such as sentence structure, jargon use, acronyms, etc.

mixed method research

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ971947%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Stanton, K. V., & Liew, C. L. (2011). Open Access Theses in Institutional Repositories: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Doctoral Students. Information Research: An International Electronic Journal16(4),

We examine doctoral students’ awareness of and attitudes to open access forms of publication. Levels of awareness of open access and the concept of institutional repositories, publishing behaviour and perceptions of benefits and risks of open access publishing were explored. Method: Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through interviews with eight doctoral students enrolled in a range of disciplines in a New Zealand university and a self-completion Web survey of 251 students. Analysis: Interview data were analysed thematically, then evaluated against a theoretical framework. The interview data were then used to inform the design of the survey tool. Survey responses were analysed as a single set, then by disciple using SurveyMonkey’s online toolkit and Excel. Results: While awareness of open access and repository archiving is still low, the majority of interview and survey respondents were found to be supportive of the concept of open access. The perceived benefits of enhanced exposure and potential for sharing outweigh the perceived risks. The majority of respondents were supportive of an existing mandatory thesis submission policy. Conclusions: Low levels of awareness of the university repository remains an issue, and could be addressed by further investigating the effectiveness of different communication channels for promotion.

PLEASE NOTE:

the researchers use the qualitative approach: by interviewing participants and analyzing their responses thematically, they build the survey.
Then then administer the survey (the quantitative approach)

How do you intend to use a mixed method? Please share

paraphrasing quotes

statement of the problem

Problem statement – Wikipedia

 
Metaphors: A Problem Statement is like… 
metaphor — a novel or poetic linguistic expression where one or more words for a concept are used outside normal conventional meaning to express a similar concept. Aristotle l 
The DNA of the research l A snapshot of the research l The foundation of the research l The Heart of the research l A “taste” of the research l A blueprint for the study
 
 
 
Here is a good exercise for your writing of the problem statement:
Chapter 3
several documents, which can be helpful in two different ways:
– check your structure and methodology
– borrow verbiage
http://education.nova.edu/Resources/uploads/app/35/files/arc_doc/writing_chpt3_quantitative_research_methods.pdf 
http://education.nova.edu/Resources/uploads/app/35/files/arc_doc/writing_chpt3_qualitative_research_methods.pdf
http://www.trinitydc.edu/sps/files/2010/09/APA-6-BGS-Quantitative-Research-Paper-August-2014.pdf

digital object identifier, or DOI

digital object identifier (DOI) is a unique alphanumeric string assigned by a registration agency (the International DOI Foundation) to identify content and provide a persistent link to its location on the Internet. The publisher assigns a DOI when your article is published and made available electronically.

Why do we need it?

2010 Changes to APA for Electronic Materials Digital object identifier (DOI). DOI available. If a DOI is available you no longer include a URL. Example: Author, A. A. (date). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume(number), page numbers. doi: xx.xxxxxxx

http://www.stcloudstate.edu/writeplace/_files/documents/working-with-sources/apa-electronic-material-citations.pdf

Mendeley (vs Zotero and/or RefWorks)

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/11355/226845?utm_campaign=Mendeley%20Webinars%202&utm_campaignPK=271205324&utm_term=OP28019&utm_content=271205712&utm_source=99&BID=799935188&utm_medium=email&SIS_ID=46360

Online Writing Tools: FourOnlineToolsforwriting

social media and altmetrics

Accodring to Sugimoto et al (2016), the Use of social media platforms for by researchers is high — ranging from 75 to 80% in large -scale surveys (Rowlands et al., 2011; Tenopir et al., 2013; Van Eperen & Marincola, 2011) .
There is one more reason, and, as much as you want to dwell on the fact that you are practitioners and research is not the most important part of your job, to a great degree, you may be judged also by the scientific output of your office and/or institution.
In that sense, both social media and altimetrics might suddenly become extremely important to understand and apply.
Shortly altmetrics (alternative metrics) measure the impact your scientific output has on the community. Your teachers and you present, publish and create work, which might not be presented and published, but may be widely reflected through, e.g. social media, and thus, having impact on the community.
How such impact is measured, if measured at all, can greatly influence the money flow to your institution
For more information:
For EVEN MORE information, read the entire article:
Sugimoto, C. R., Work, S., Larivière, V., & Haustein, S. (2016). Scholarly use of social media and altmetrics: a review of the literature. Retrieved from https://arxiv.org/abs/1608.08112
related information:
In the comments section on this blog entry,
I left notes to
Thelwall, M., & Wilson, P. (2016). Mendeley readership altmetrics for medical articles: An analysis of 45 fields. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 67(8), 1962–1972. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.23501
Todd Tetzlaff is using Mendeley and he might be the only one to benefit … 🙂
Here is some food for thought from the article above:
Doctoral students and junior researchers are the largest reader group in Mendeley ( Haustein & Larivière, 2014; Jeng et al., 2015; Zahedi, Costas, & Wouters, 2014a) .
Studies have also provided evidence of high rate s of blogging among certain subpopulations: for example, approximately one -third of German university staff (Pscheida et al., 2013) and one fifth of UK doctoral students use blogs (Carpenter et al., 2012) .
Social data sharing platforms provide an infrastructure to share various types of scholarly objects —including datasets, software code, figures, presentation slides and videos —and for users to interact with these objects (e.g., comment on, favorite, like , and reuse ). Platforms such as Figshare and SlideShare disseminate scholars’ various types of research outputs such as datasets, figures, infographics, documents, videos, posters , or presentation slides (Enis, 2013) and displays views, likes, and shares by other users (Mas -Bleda et al., 2014) .
Frequently mentioned social platforms in scholarly communication research include research -specific tools such as Mendeley, Zotero, CiteULike, BibSonomy, and Connotea (now defunct) as well as general tools such as Delicious and Digg (Hammond, Hannay, Lund, & Scott, 2005; Hull, Pettifer, & Kell, 2008; Priem & Hemminger, 2010; Reher & Haustein, 2010) .
qualitative research
“The focus group interviews were analysed based on the principles of interpretative phenomenology”
 
1. What are  interpretative phenomenology?
Here is an excellent article in ResarchGate:
 
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263767248_A_practical_guide_to_using_Interpretative_Phenomenological_Analysis_in_qualitative_research_psychology
 
and a discussion from the psychologists regarding the weaknesses when using IPA (Interpretative phenomenological analysis)

https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-24/edition-10/methods-interpretative-phenomenological-analysis

2. What is Constant Comparative Method?

http://www.qualres.org/HomeCons-3824.html

Nvivo shareware

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/01/11/nvivo-shareware/

Qualitative and Quantitative research in lame terms
podcast:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/how-scientific-method-works/id278981407?i=1000331586170&mt=2
if you are not podcast fans, I understand. The link above is a pain in the behind to make work, if you are not familiar with using podcast.
Here is an easier way to find it:
1. open your cell phone and go find the podcast icon, which is pre-installed, but you might have not ever used it [yet].
2. In the app, use the search option and type “stuff you should know”
3. the podcast will pop up. scroll and find “How the scientific method works,” and/or search for it if you can.
Once you can play it on the phone, you have to find time to listen to it.
I listen to podcast when i have to do unpleasant chores such as: 1. walking to work 2. washing the dishes 3. flying long hours (very rarely). 4. Driving in the car.
There are bunch of other situations, when you may be strapped and instead of filling disgruntled and stressed, you can deliver the mental [junk] food for your brain.
Earbuds help me: 1. forget the unpleasant task, 2. Utilize time 3. Learn cool stuff
Here are podcasts, I am subscribed for, besides “stuff you should know”:
TED Radio Hour
TED Talks Education
NPR Fresh Air
BBC History
and bunch others, which, if i don’t go a listen for an year, i go and erase and if i peruse through the top chart and something picks my interest, I try.
If I did not manage to convince to podcast, totally fine; do not feel obligated.
However, this podcast, you can listen to on your computer, if you don’t want to download on your phone.
It is one hour show by two geeks, who are trying to make funny (and they do) a dry matter such as quantitative vs qualitative, which you want to internalize:
1. Sometimes at minute 12, they talk about inductive versus deductive to introduce you to qualitative versus quantitative. It is good to listen to their musings, since your dissertation is going through inductive and deductive process, and understanding it, can help you control better your dissertation writing. 
2. Scientific method. Hypothesis etc (around min 17).
While this is not a Ph.D., but Ed.D. and we do not delve into the philosophy of science and dissertation etc. the more you know about this process, the better control you have over your dissertation. 
3. Methods and how you prove (Chapter 3) is discussed around min 35
4. dependent and independent variables and how do you do your research in general (min ~45)
Shortly, listen and please do share your thoughts below. You do not have to be kind to this source offering. Actually, be as critical as possible, so you can help me decide, if I should offer it to the next cohort and thank you in advance for your feedback. 

 

 

Library FYE ROI and HIP

Emerging Library Trends in FYE

From FYE to ROI to HIP, librarians are seeing new acronyms emerge in their campus administrations’ initiatives. How can today’s academic libraries position themselves to improve student success and retention, using high-impact practices (HIPs) to demonstrate a return-on-investment (ROI)? Many libraries struggle to define and implement their services in a way that meets these shifting expectations.

Wednesday,  June 13, 2018 2:00 PM Eastern 1:00 PM Central12:00 PM Mountain 11:00 AM Pacific

To register: https://goo.gl/EhzBRi

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more on ROI in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=return+on+investment

Measuring Learning Outcomes of New Library Initiatives

International Conference on Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries 2018 (QQML2018)

conf@qqml.net

Where: Cultural Centre Of Chania
ΠΝΕΥΜΑΤΙΚΟ ΚΕΝΤΡΟ ΧΑΝΙΩΝ

https://goo.gl/maps/8KcyxTurBAL2

also live broadcast at https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/videos/1542057332571425/

Posted by InforMedia Services on Thursday, May 24, 2018

When: May 24, 12:30AM-2:30PM (local time; 4:40AM-6:30AM, Chicago Central)

Programme QQML2018-23pgopv

Live broadcasts from some of the sessions:

#QQML2018 Sebastian Bock w @Springer Nature about citation #metrics and beyond

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Here is a link to Sebastian Bock’s presentation:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jSOyNXQuqgGTrhHIapq0uxAXQAvkC6Qb/view

#qqml2018

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, May 23, 2018

#qqml2018 after two hurricanes presenting

Posted by InforMedia Services on Thursday, May 24, 2018

#qqml2018 Carla Fulgham hashtags

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Information literacy skills and college students from Jade Geary

Session 1:
http://qqml.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/SESSION-Miltenoff.pdf

Session Title: Measuring Learning Outcomes of New Library Initiatives Coordinator: Professor Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS, St. Cloud State University, USA Contact: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu Scope & rationale: The advent of new technologies, such as virtual/augmented/mixed reality, and new pedagogical concepts, such as gaming and gamification, steers academic libraries in uncharted territories. There is not yet sufficiently compiled research and, respectively, proof to justify financial and workforce investment in such endeavors. On the other hand, dwindling resources for education presses administration to demand justification for new endeavors. As it has been established already, technology does not teach; teachers do; a growing body of literature questions the impact of educational technology on educational outcomes. This session seeks to bring together presentations and discussion, both qualitative and quantitative research, related to new pedagogical and technological endeavors in academic libraries as part of education on campus. By experimenting with new technologies such as Video 360 degrees and new pedagogical approaches such as gaming and gamification, does the library improve learning? By experimenting with new technologies and pedagogical approaches, does the library help campus faculty to adopt these methods and improve their teaching? How can results be measured, demonstrated?

Conference program

http://qqml.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/7.5.2018-programme_final.pdf

More information and bibliography:

https://www.academia.edu/Documents/in/Videogame_and_Virtual_World_Technologies_Serious_Games_applications_in_Education_and_Training

https://www.academia.edu/Documents/in/Measurement_and_evaluation_in_education

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/QQML-International-Conference-575508262589919/

 

 

 

Academic libraries teaching and learning outcomes

Chad, K., & Anderson, H. (2017). The new role of the library in teaching and learning outcomes (p. ). Higher Education Library Technology. https://doi.org/10.13140/rg.2.2.14688.89606/1
p. 4 “Modern university libraries require remote access for large numbers of concurrent users, with fewer authentication steps and more flexible digital rights management (DRM) to satisfy student demand”. They found the most frequent problem was that core reading list titles were not available to libraries as e-books.
p. 5 Overcoming the “textbook taboo”
In the US, academic software firm bepress notes that, in response to increased student textbook costs: “Educators, institutions, and even state legislators are turning their attention toward Open Educational Resources (OER)” in order to save students money while increasing engagement and retention. As a result bepress has developed its infrastructure to host and share OER within and across institutions.21 The UMass Library Open Education Initiative estimates it has saved the institution over $1.3 million since its inception in 2011. 22 Other textbook initiatives include SUNY Open Textbooks, developed by the State University of New York Libraries, which has already published 18 textbooks, and OpenStax, developed by Rice University.
p.5. sceptics about OER rapid progress still see potential in working with publishers.
Knowledge Unlatched 23 is an example of this kind of collaboration: “We believe that by working together libraries and publishers can create a sustainable route to Open Access for scholarly books.” Groups of libraries contribute to fund publication though a crowdfunding platform. The consortium pays a fixed upfront fee for the publisher to publish the book online under a Creative Commons license.
p.6.Technology: from library systems to educational technology.The rise of the library centric reading list system
big increase in the number of universities in the UK, Australia and New Zealand deploying library reading lists solutions.The online reading list can be seen as a sort of course catalogue that gives the user a (sometimes week-by-week) course/module view on core resources and provides a link to print holdings information or the electronic full text. It differs significantly from the integrated library system (ILS) ‘course reserve’ module, notably by providing access to materials beyond the items in the library catalogue. Titles can be characterised, for example as ‘recommended’ or ‘essential’ reading and citations annotated.
Reading list software brings librarians and academics together into a system where they must cooperate to be effective. Indeed some librarians claim that the reading list system is a key library tool for transforming student learning.
Higher education institutions, particularly those in Australia, New Zealand and some other parts of Europe (including the UK) are more likely to operate a reading list model, supplying students with a (sometimes long) list of recommended titles.
p.8. E-book platforms (discusses only UK)
p.9. Data: library management information to learning analytics
p.10. Leadership
“Strong digital leadership is a key feature of effective educational organisations and its absence can be a significant barrier to progress. The digital agenda is therefore a leadership issue”. 48 (Rebooting learning for the digital age: What next for technology-enhanced higher education? Sarah Davies, Joel Mullan, Paul Feldman. Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) Report 93. February 2017. )
A merging of LibTech and EdTech
The LITA discussion is under RE: [lita-l] Anyone Running Multiple Discovery Layers?
http://helibtech.com/Reading_Resource+lists
from Ken Varnum: https://search.lib.umich.edu/everything

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more on academic library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

academic libraries and social media

Howard, H. A. (2018). Academic Libraries on Social Media: Finding the Students and the Information They Want. Information Technology and Libraries, 37(1), 8–18. https://doi.org/10.6017/ital.v37i1.10160
https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/article/view/10160
In his book Tell Everyone: Why We Share and Why It Matters, Alfred Hermida states, “People are not hooked on YouTube, Twitter or Facebook but on each other. Tools and services come and go; what is constant is our human urge to share.”1 Libraries are places of connection, where people connect with information, technologies, ideas, and each other. As such, libraries look for ways to increase this connection through communication.
Academic libraries have been slow to accept social media as a venue for either promoting their services or academic purposes. A 2007 study of 126 academic librarians found that only 12 percent of those surveyed “identified academic potential or possible benefits” of Facebook while 54 percent saw absolutely no value in social media.2 However, the mission of academic libraries has shifted in the last decade from being a repository of knowledge to being a conduit for information literacy; new roles include being a catalyst for on-campus collaboration and a facilitator for scholarly publication within contemporary academic librarianship.3 Academic librarians have responded to this change, with many now believing that “social media, which empowers libraries to connect with and engage its diverse stakeholder groups, has a vital role to play in moving academic libraries beyond their traditional borders and helping them engage new stakeholder groups.”4
The project focused on three research questions:
1. What social media platforms are students using?
2. What social media platforms do students want the library to use?
3. What kind of content do students want from the library on each of these platforms?
survey using the web-based Qualtrics
The social media platforms included were Facebook, Flickr, G+, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Qzone, Renren, Snapchat, Tumblr, Twitter, YouTube, and Yik Yak
The second survey also lasted for three weeks starting in mid-April of the spring 2017 semester. As a participation incentive, students who completed the initial survey and the second survey had an opportunity to enter a drawing for a $25 Visa gift card.Library social media follows
Library social media presence
we intend to develop better communication channels, a clear social media presence, and a more cohesive message across the Purdue libraries. Under the direction of our new director of strategic communication, a social media committee was formed with representatives from each of the libraries to contribute content for social media. The committee will consider expanding the Purdue Libraries’ social media presence to communication channels where students have said they are and would like us to be.
+++++++++++++
More on social media and libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+libraries

SCSU library digitizing VHS

SCSU library digitizing VHS tapes

  1. plan
    1. hardware and software
    2. digitizing process
    3. archiving process
    4. issues
  2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen
  3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”
  4. Plan
  • collecting (Identifying VHS to digitize)
  • clearing (Digitize or not digitize?):
    • duplicates (Checking collection for content in other formats)
    • establishing if DVD can be purchased (Availability for sale new)
    • clearing copyrights etc. (Copyright / fair use review )
  • Digitizing the tapes
  • Adobe Premiere CC
    • Capture
    • metadata
      Metadata screen
    • this why  metadata was entered in the post-processed MP4 file using the VLC player

metadata VLC-

 

  • export
    H.264 . /   iPAD 480p 29.9 fps

Shortcuts:

If you are using Premiere CC: 1. File/New/Sequence. 2. Ctrl M is the shortcut to export (M is for media)

Issues
the two Apple/Macs will deliver error messages with both the export to the MP4 format and for burning the CDs and DVDs.
e.g.

  • other issues
    regular restart required for new capture
    error messages e.g.
    error message Premiere CC

 

 

 

 

 

 

other issues:

audio. Audio synchronization during the digitization is off. Solution: possible solution is the last of this thread : https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2217377

open in in QT Pro copy an segment then past it into a new QT file and save. It then plays normally in Adobe products. 

old Apple desktops. needed to be rebuild and reformatted.
Apple burner issues. issues with Premiere license (bigger organization, bigger bureaucracy – keep the licenses within the library, not with IT or the business department)

old VCRs – one of the VCRs was recording bad audio signal

old VHS tapes: the signal jump makes the digital recording stop, thus requiring a constant attendance of the digitization, instead of letting it be digitized and working on something else

burn CD error

Upon upload to MediaSpace,

upload MediaSpace

 

 

the person who is uploading the digitized VHS movies can “Add Collaborator”

add collaborator

 

 

 

The collaborator can be “co-editor” and / or “co-publisher”

co editor

Thus, at the moment, Tom Hegert has been designated to a digitized VHS video as Co-:Publisher and Rhonda Huisman as “Co-Editor.”

Please DO log in into MediaSpace with your STAR ID and confirm that you can locate the video and you can, respectively edit its metadata.

If you can edit the video, this means that the proposed system will work, since the Library can follow the same pattern to “distribute” the videos to the instructors, who these videos are used by; and, respectively these instructors can further control the distribution of the videos in their classes.

  • issues:
    sharing the videos from the generic Library account for MediaSpace to the MediaSPace account of the faculty who had requested the digitization either through sending the link to the video or publish in channel (we called our channel “digitized VHS”)

MediaSpace Channel

 

 

 

  •  issue: ripping off content from DVD.
    Faculty (mostly teaching online / hybrid courses) want to place teaching material from DVD to MediaSpace. Most DVDs are DRM protected.
    Handbreak (https://handbrake.fr/) does not allow ripping DRM-ed DVDs.
    handbreak DRMto bypass this Handbreak issue, we use DVD Decrypter before we run the file through Handbreak
    Solutions:

From: “Lanska, Jeremiah K” <Jeremiah.Lanska@ridgewater.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 10:03 AM
I use a software on a MAC called MacX DVD Video Converter Pro.
https://www.macxdvd.com/
I convert videos to MP4 with this and it just works for just about any DVD. Then upload them to MediaSpace.

Jer Lanska  Media Services Ridgewater College Jeremiah.lanska@ridgewater.edu 320-234-8575

From: “Docken, Marti L” <Marti.Docken@saintpaul.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 8:17 AM

Good morning Plamen.  Here at Saint Paul College, we are asked to get permission from owner when we are looking at making any alterations to a video, tape, etc.  This is true of adding closed captioning as well.  The attached are forms given by Minnesota State which they may have an updated form.
Thank you and have a wonderful day.
Marti Docken Instructional Technology Specialist 651.846.1339 marti.docken@saintpaul.edu

Permission Request Form to Add Closed Caption-288flgx

Memo Closed Captioning Copyright FINAL 10 03 2011-1065jox

From: Geri Wilson
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 3:23 PM
What I do with DVDs is give a warning to the faculty that the MediaSpace link with the captions I’ve created should not be widely shared and should be treated as if it were still a DVD that can be shown in the classroom, but not posted on D2L. Because even if we use those forms, I don’t believe it gives us the right to use the video in a broader way. However, a safer approach might be to burn a new DVD with captions, so that it’s still in the same format that can’t be misused as easily.

Just my 2 cents. Geri

From: “Hunter, Gary B” <Gary.Hunter@minnstate.edu>
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018 at 2:55 PM
To: Plamen Miltenoff_old <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Process of ripping DVD video to mount it on MediaSpace

I’ll assume the contents of the DVDs are movies/films unless I hear otherwise from you.  There’s a lot we need to consider from a copyright perspective. Let me know a day and time that we can touch base via a phone call.  Next week my schedule is flexible, so let me know what day and time work for you.  Until we speak, here’s some of the information related to making copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit teaching purposes.

There are two sections of the Copyright Act that authorize “copying” of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  It doesn’t matter if the copyrighted works are being copied from DVDs, CDs, flash drives, a computer’s hard drive, etc., the same sections of the Copyright Act apply.

  1. Section 110(2), also known as the TEACH Act, allows nonprofit educational institutions to make a digital copy of a nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to a server for online and hybrid teaching.  I have a TEACH Act checklist on the IP Tools & Forms webpage at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html.  The checklist identifies the few things that may not be copied under this section of the Copyright Act.  If an instructor meets the various requirements on the checklist, than you can make a digital copy of the entire nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to MediaSpace. For nondramatic works, all MinnState instructors should be able to complete the TEACH Act checklist successfully, so I wouldn’t request a completed checklist from them.

Under the TEACH Act, nonprofit educational institutions are only permitted to make a digital copy of reasonable and limited portions of dramatic copyrighted works.  Movies and films are usually dramatic works.   Most people in higher education interpret “reasonable and limited portions” to mean something less than the whole and not the entire movie/film.  There are several guidance documents on the TEACH Act on the IP Tools & Forms webpage that go into greater detail as to what is reasonable and limited portions.  Unfortunately, this section only authorizes the copying of part of the movie/film and not the entire thing.

  1. Section 107 Fair Use of the Copyright Act is the second section that permits copying of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  Fair Use is used more than any other section to make copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes. An instructor needs to complete a fair Use Checklist showing the proposed copying is authorized by fair use.  An instructor who completes a Fair Use Checklist that ends up being 50/50 or more in support of fair use for their proposed copying of a copyrighted work, should be able to make the digital copy.  Fair Use has some nuances in it for unique situations.  Let’s set up a phone call to further discuss them.  There is also a flow chart that may helpful at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/docs/Flow%20Chart-Using%20video%20in%20Online%20-%20D2L%20Courses.pdf.

We also have to consider whether or not the movies/films were purchased with “personal use” rights or “public performance” rights.  Or if an educational license or some similar type of license gives us permission to make copies or publicly perform the movie/film.  More layers of the onion that need peeled back to address the copyright concerns.

++++++++++++++

  • Issue: confidentiality
    All digitized material is backedup on DVDs, whether faculty wants a DVD or not.
    Some video content is confidential (e.g. interviews with patients) and faculty does not want any extra copies, but the DVD submitted to them. How do we archive / do we archive the content then?

error msg upload MediSpaceBurning (Archiving)

  • where to store the burned DVDs? their shelf life is 12 years.
  • DVD’s must be labeled with soft tip perm marker, not labels. labels glue ages quickly.
  • all our desktops are outdated (5+ years and older). We used two Apple/Macs. OS El Captain, Version 10.11.6, 2.5 Gxz Intel Core i5. 8GB memory, 1333 MHz DDR3, Graphic Card AMD Radeon HD 6750 MD 512 MB

 

Question about the process of archiving the CDs and DVDs after burning. What is the best way to archive the digitized material? Store the CD and DVDs? Keep them in the “cloud?”

Question about the management of working files: 1. Premiere digitizes the original hi-quality file in .mov format and it is in GB. The export is in .mp4 format and it is in MB. Is it worth to store the GB-size .mov format and for how long, considering that the working station has a limited HDD of 200GB

we decided to export two types of files using Adobe Premiere: a) a low end .MP4 file about several hundred megabites, which respectively is uploaded in SCSU Media Space (AKA Kaltura) and b) one high-end (better quality) one the realm of several GBs, which was the archived copy

digital preservation vhs tapes-workflow

We placed a request for two 2TB HDD with the library dean and 10TB file space with the SCSU IT department. Idea being to have the files for MediaSpace readily available on the hardrives, if we have to make them available to faculty and the high-end files being stored on the SCSU file server.

++++++++++++++++++
Nov. 2019: transfer of accounts. The generic SCSULibraryVideo account is discontinued because of the August 2019 transition to the minnstate.edu. Agreed to host the accumulated digitized videos under the private account of one of the team members, who will be assigning the other members and the requesting faculty as co-editors.

++++++++++++++++++

2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen

email correspondence Greg, Tom, Plamen regarding Kaltura account:

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:32 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Question Kaltura

Plamen,

Channels are not required using this workflow.  Just the collaboration change.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:31 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Question Kaltura

Greg,

About the channel:

Do I create one channel (videos)?

It seems to be a better idea to create separate channels for each of faculty, who’s videotapes are digitized.

Your take?

p

 

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:28 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

You can now sign in here: https://scsu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/  with SCSULibraryVideo as the user and whatever password you selected.

Upload a video.

Click the edit button:

Choose the collaboration ‘tab’:

Add a collaborator:

Just type in part of their name:

Add them as co-editor and co-publisher.

******* any user you wish to collaborate with, will need to first sign in to mediaspace in order to provision their account.****  After they have signed in, you will be able to add them as collaborator.

Once they’ve been added, they will have access to the video in their MedisSpace account.

Like so:

From the My Media area:

Click ‘Filters’:

Then choose either media I can publish, or media I can edit:

If you want to simply change ownership to the requestor (for video available only to a single person), just choose change media owner on the collaboration tab.

The process above will allow for any number of collaborators, in a fashion similar to ‘on reserve’.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: FW: Supplemental Account Request Status

Tom,

I submitted the request to Greg with the “SCSULibraryVideo” name

Greg, I submitted, Tom, Rachel W and Rhonda H (and you) as “owners.”
Pls, if possible, do not assigned to Tom ownership rights yet and add him later on.

I also received your approval, so I am starting to work on it

Txs

p

—————-

 

From: Husky Tech <huskytech@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:16 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

This message confirms your request for a new Supplemental Account with the requested username of SCSULibraryVideo. Please allow 2-3 business days for processing. You will be notified by email when your request is approved or denied. You may also check the status of your request by returning to the Supplemental Accounts Maintenance site.

Thank you for your request and please contact us with questions or concerns.

HuskyTech
720 4th Avenue South
St. Cloud, MN 56301
(320) 308-7000
HuskyTech@stcloudstate.edu

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:11 AM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

 

Plamen, (or Tom)

 

Go here and request one: https://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/myHuskyNet/supplemental-acct.asp

Once you’ve done that, just let me know the name of the account.  (LibraryVideoDrop, SCSULibraryVideo, etc….)

I’ll then add it to the Mediaspace access list.

 

If there’s already an account to which you have access, we can use that, too.  Remember, though, credentials will be shared at least between the two of you.

 

–g–

 

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:08 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Well, that is a good question. Do we need a “STAR ID” type of account for the library?
If so, who will be the person to talk to. After Diane Schmitt, I do not know who to ask

Tom, can you ask the library dean’s office for any “generic” account?

Greg, for the time being, is it possible to have me as the “owner” of that account? Would that conflict with my current Kaltura account/content?

Can I participate for this project with my student account (as you helpled me several weeks ago restore it for D2L usage)?

p

—————-

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

Professor

320-308-3072

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/

Knowledge is built from active engagement with conflicting and confounding ideas that challenge older, pre-existing knowledge (Piaget, 1952).

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:04 AM
To: Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Tom – I think we can accommodate that, too….

I like Plamen’s idea of a test.

Plamen – is there a library dept supplemental account we should also use as part of the test?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:50 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Yes, except that there may be needs for multiple faculty to access the files. Think of it as analogous to DVDs on reserve or even in the general collection.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:29 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Hmmm…..

Would this be the process:

  • VHS digitized
  • File placed in Mediaspace (SCSULibrary supplemental acct, for example, would be the ‘owner’/uploader)
  • Link sent to original faculty requestor for review of file (if it was edited/correct edits made, CC burned in for open captions, etc…)
  • Ownership transfer to requesting faculty so they can share link/embed, etc… as they need.

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:24 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Send someone the link, probably allow downloads by faculty, absolutely stream via MediaSpace

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:22 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Share, as in send someone the link? Or share, as in, let others upload/download from the location?

Do these things need to stream from the location (as in Mediaspace), or is this more of a file drop?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

I think we’re hoping for an account from which we can share Library resources such as the digitized versions of VHS tapes that Plamen and I are creating. As I understand it, a closed channel is probably not the best answer. We need a common repository that can have open access to SCSU Kaltura users.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 2:03 PM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

A single account can’t really be shared in the way you’re asking, but we can easily add a dept. supplemental account to Mediaspace.  I just need the name of the account.

Depending on what you intend, maybe a closed channel? Create a closed channel and add individuals as needed?

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 11:41 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Kaltura’s account for the library

Greg,

Can you help me create a MediaSpace account for the library use.
How can it be tight up to the STAR ID login specifications?

Is it possible, let’s say Tom and I to use our STAR ID to login into such account?
Any info is welcome…

Plamen

++++++++++++

3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”

 

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Sharona Ginsberg <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:07 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

I’m at an academic rather than public library, but you can see what we offer for digital conversion here: https://www.oswego.edu/library/digital-conversion. We’ve been generally happy with our equipment, and I especially think the Elgato Video Capture device (VHS to digital) is a good tool.

– Sharona

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Molly Schwartz <mschwartz@metro.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:03 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

Hi Stew,

We are not a public library, but we did recently set up an AV media transfer rack here in METRO’s studio in partnership with the XFR Collective. There is a full list of the media formats we can transfer here on our website, as well as a lot more great information in the documentation.

 

I would also definitely recommend DCPL’s Memory Lab and the project to build a Memory Lab Network, which is more applicable to public libraries.

 

best,

Molly

 

On Tue, Nov 21, 2017 at 10:49 AM, Stewart Wilson <SWilson@onlib.org> wrote:

Hi all,

I know there is a lot of information already out here, but is anyone up for a conversation about media conversion technologies for public library patrons?

 

I’m interested in best practices and recommended technologies or guides that you use in your system.

 

Anything that converts projector slides, 35mm, VHS, photographs, cassette, etc.

 

We are building a new PC for this and 3D rendering, so any recommendations for things like soundcards or video capture cards are also useful.

 

Thanks for your help; this group is the best.​

 

Stew Wilson

Paralibrarian for Network Administration and Technology

Community Library of Dewitt & Jamesville

swilson@onlib.org

315 446 3578
To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see http://www.ala.org/lita/involve/email

Molly C. Schwartz

Studio Manager

http://metro.org/services/599studio

mschwartz@metro.org

212-228-7132

esummit 2018 prsentation
https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/scsu-library-digitizing-archiving-vhs-tapes-105758307

SCSU library digitizing/ archiving VHS tapes from Plamen Miltenoff

++++++++
more on digitizing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitizing

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