Searching for "adobe connect"

productivity and physical space

In 2019, does it matter where do we perform our work?
When I asked in 2009 to use e-conferencing tools (Skype, Adobe Connect back then) to allow better attendance at faculty meetings, there was a mountain of arguments why NOT to. Such attitude was clearly expressed during the slow and painful advent of “online” education, which still leans more to “correspondence course” mentality rather then synchronous and interactive modern education.

The worst part is that in 2019 the attitude still persists.

synchronous vs asynchronous

My Note: synchronous vs asynchronous; Adobe Connect vs Zoom. Also Flipgrid for asynchronous videochats.

From: EDUCAUSE Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU> on behalf of Celine Greene <celine.greene@JHU.EDU>
Reply-To: EDUCAUSE Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 at 2:38 PM
To: EDUCAUSE Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [BLEND-ONLINE] Advice for Synchronous Online Classes Using Zoom Meetings?

Our school is transitioning from using Adobe Connect to using Zoom Meetings for synchronous online class sessions, of which most of our online courses schedule at least a few times each term. So after years of “controlling the user experience” with the Adobe Connect layouts and relying primarily on text chat, we are heading in the direction of screen sharing with the enhanced social and community-building experience of video “taking over” chat. Some people are very excited about this move, given the popularity and ease-of-use of the Zoom platforms. Other people are a little more wary – especially when it comes to large (e.g., 40 to 200+ students) classes.

Please share your thoughts and experiences on what faculty and students should be aware of when using Zoom Meetings (not the webinar) for a synchronous class session. Here’s some of the things I was curious about…

  • Do you have a set of “instructions” or recommendations for students — e.g. so they see the chat as it happens?
  • Are there any best practices in terms of meetings set-up that you recommend for your faculty? (Mute participants upon entry, always show meeting control bar, etc.)
  • Have there been some scenarios that have been fantastic or some that have been horrible for using Zoom?
  • Is there a class size where the number of participants starts negatively impacting the learning opportunity? (i.e., I realize Breakout rooms are an option but also not appropriate for all situations, such as having a guest speaker come in to have an interactive Q & A or having a software demonstration.)
  • Are there any major “fails” you’ve learned from or, alternately, success stories?
  • Are your students required to have Zoom accounts?
  • Do you have a method for tracking attendance?

Thanks for your input!  – celine  Celine Greene  Instructional Technologist  Center for Teaching and Learning, JHSPH http://ctl.jhsph.edu

+++++++++
more on synchronous learning environments
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=synchronous

MinnState about GDPR at SCSU

Daniel McCabe, Assistant General Counsel, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities,  share information about the GDPR on Thursday, March 28, between 2 and 3 p.m., Miller Center B17.  The GDPR provides the world’s strongest protection for the personal information of individuals.  It was adopted by both the European Parliament and the European Council in April of 2016 and became effective on May 25, 2018.

Presentation available with this Adobe Connect link: https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/recordings/join/pv3prb7mie1i

https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/photos/a.554966814613820/1954876077956213

GDPR Update for St. Cloud State (002)-2d8zvmu (PPT)

+++++++++++++++++++
more on GDPR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/31/what-is-gdpr/

GBL XR DS for IM 554

Course title: IM 554 Developing Skills for Online Teaching and Learning

Topic for this week: Game-based learning, Virtual Reliability, and Augmented Reality
Audience: IM Graduate students working for K12 schools or in business

March 28, Adobe Connect. http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/im554_park/

Events worth mentioning (pls share if you would like to discuss details):

1. Where are we now compared to:

2018: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/03/27/im-554-discussion-on-gbl-2018/

2017: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/im554-discussion-gbl/

2. How did GBL change in the past year? Who is the leader in this research (country)? Is K12 the “playground” for GBL and DGBL?

China: Liao, C., Chen, C., & Shih, S. (2019). The interactivity of video and collaboration for learning achievement, intrinsic motivation, cognitive load, and behavior patterns in a digital game-based learning environment. Computers & Education133, 43–55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2019.01.013

Finalnd: Brezovszky, B., Mcmullen, J., Veermans, K., Hannula-Sormunen, M., Rodríguez-Aflecht, G., Pongsakdi, N., … Lehtinen, E. (2019). Effects of a mathematics game-based learning environment on primary school students’ adaptive number knowledge. Computers & Education128, 63–74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2018.09.011

Tunesia: Denden, M., Tlili, A., Essalmi, F., & Jemni, M. (2018). Implicit modeling of learners’ personalities in a game-based learning environment using their gaming behaviors. Smart Learning Environments5(1), 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40561-018-0078-6

Pitarch, R. (2018). An Approach to Digital Game-based Learning: Video-games Principles and Applications in Foreign Language Learning. Journal of Language Teaching and Research9(6), 1147–1159. https://doi.org/10.17507/jltr.0906.04

3. DGBL vs Serous Games vs Gamification

4. BYOx. Still timely?

5. XR and its relation to ID (instructional design) and the gamification of education:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/10/16/eli-2018-key-issues-teaching-learning/

#7 is ID, #13 is emerging technologies.

What is VR, AR, MR. Immersive learning?
examples from SCSU:
https://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

Examples from other universities as presented at Nercomp 2019 workshop:

https://zoom.us/recording/share/YtDl7AA3Te_whtCnZZdv93EiNZbljU7yyzl7ibOEam-wIumekTziMw?startTime=1552927676000

min 29 from start: University of Connecticut (chapter 1)
min 58 from start: Dan Getz with Penn State (chapter 2)
hour 27 min from start: Randy Rode, Yale (chapter 3)

++++++++++++
last year plan for IM 554 https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/03/27/im-554-discussion-on-gbl-2018/

Culturally Responsive Education in Design and the Arts

Culturally Responsive Education in Design and the Arts

March 1, 2019, 8:30 am- 5:00 pm
Minneapolis College, 1501 Hennepin Avenue in Minneapolis
AND online via Adobe Connect and Zoom

Closed-Captioning Videos and Creating Syllabi and Classroom Materials That Are Accessible to All  1:15-2:30PM
Brittany Mammenga, Captioning Coordinator
Manee Yang, Digital Access and Assistive Tech Specialist
K3350
Adobe Connect https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/session2accessibility

The College Fear Factor

Equity Book Group & D2L Brightspace Course

A Professional Development Opportunity for All Faculty and Staff

What: Statewide opportunity to read, discuss, interact, share and learn with a book on a topic of interest and relevance for our work. This year the topic is improving communication with students and enhancing their sense of belonging.  Created by: Rebecca March and Cheryl Neudauer, Minneapolis College

The book is The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand Each Other.  Rebecca Cox “spent five years talking to, and watching, community college students. She noted carefully the many ways they failed their classes. She listened closely to their reasons why.” – Jay Mathews, Washington Post blog

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/11/18/college-fear-factor

  1. Three 90-minute virtual Adobe Connect meetings to discuss how the experiences and perspectives in this book relate to our students and communities.  Virtual meetings are scheduled for:
    • Thursday, February 21 – 12:00-1:30 pm 
    • Thursday, March 28 – 12:00-1:30 pm
    • Thursday, April 18 – 12:00-1:30 pm
  2. D2L Brightspace course to explore issues related to communicating with our students both outside of and within the classroom, orally and through our documents, policies, and electronic communications and how these impact their sense of belonging.  The “course” will use short, asynchronous, interactive activities to help us explore how we can better serve our students, connect across the system, and share resources.

++++++++++++++++++
2nd meeting, March 28, 2019.

CHAPTER 2 THE STUDENT FEAR FACTOR  (pp. 20-41)
Engaging the Online Learner Activities and Resources for Creative Instruction:
http://eltandtech.pbworks.com/f/engaging+the+online+learner.pdf

motivation. goal has value

MnState OER webinar

Open Textbook Webinar — a 90-minute online meeting to learn about open textbooks.

Peer review of open textbooks is a critical component of assessing quality and supporting faculty looking for resources to use in their own classes.  After the workshop, you’ll be eligible to earn a $200 stipend if you provide a short review of an open textbook from the OpenTextbook Library.  Reviews are due 6-8 weeks following the workshop.

To prepare for the webinar, please take a few minutes and visit the Open Textbook Library (http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/). Glance through the Open Textbook Library and look for textbooks in your discipline that may be appropriate for you to review.  In order to receive the $200 stipend, you must 1) participate in the webinar and 2) complete a textbook review.  (Please note: There may not be texts available for review in your areas of expertise.)

When:   Wednesday, November 14, 2018; 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Note that additional Open Textbook Webinars are scheduled throughout the academic year.  Please contact Karen Pikula, OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at Karen.Pikula@minnstate.edu if you cannot attend the meeting on Monday. 

How:     Join the webinar through Adobe Connect

My notes:

open.umn.edu

3 models of creating textbooks: 1. write a book on their own 2. commercial model 3. Funder

Creative Common and copyright.

creative commons licenses

CC licenses free to: copy, share, edit, mix, keep, use

reviewing a textbook in the OER. Edit a book in OER

1 2 3 6