Searching for "algorithm "

social media algorithms

How algorithms impact our browsing behavior? browsing history?
What is the connection between social media algorithms and fake news?
Are there topic-detection algorithms as they are community-detection ones?
How can I change the content of a [Google] search return? Can I? 

Larson, S. (2016, July 8). What is an Algorithm and How Does it Affect You? The Daily Dot. Retrieved from https://www.dailydot.com/debug/what-is-an-algorithm/
Berg, P. (2016, June 30). How Do Social Media Algorithms Affect You | Forge and Smith. Retrieved September 19, 2017, from https://forgeandsmith.com/how-do-social-media-algorithms-affect-you/
Oremus, W., & Chotiner, I. (2016, January 3). Who Controls Your Facebook Feed. Slate. Retrieved from http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/cover_story/2016/01/how_facebook_s_news_feed_algorithm_works.html
Lehrman, R. A. (2013, August 11). The new age of algorithms: How it affects the way we live. Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved from https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2013/0811/The-new-age-of-algorithms-How-it-affects-the-way-we-live
Johnson, C. (2017, March 10). How algorithms affect our way of life. Desert News. Retrieved from https://www.deseretnews.com/article/865675141/How-algorithms-affect-our-way-of-life.html
Understanding algorithms and their impact on human life goes far beyond basic digital literacy, some experts said.
An example could be the recent outcry over Facebook’s news algorithm, which enhances the so-called “filter bubble”of information.
personalized search (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personalized_search)
Kounine, A. (2016, August 24). How your personal data is used in personalization and advertising. Retrieved September 19, 2017, from https://www.tastehit.com/blog/personal-data-in-personalization-and-advertising/
Hotchkiss, G. (2007, March 9). The Pros & Cons Of Personalized Search. Retrieved September 19, 2017, from http://searchengineland.com/the-pros-cons-of-personalized-search-10697
Magid, L. (2012). How (and why) To Turn Off Google’s Personalized Search Results. Forbes. Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/sites/larrymagid/2012/01/13/how-and-why-to-turn-off-googles-personalized-search-results/#53a30be838f2
Nelson, P. (n.d.). Big Data, Personalization and the No-Search of Tomorrow. Retrieved September 19, 2017, from https://www.searchtechnologies.com/blog/big-data-search-personalization

gender

Massanari, A. (2017). #Gamergate and The Fappening: How Reddit’s algorithm, governance, and culture support toxic technocultures. New Media & Society19(3), 329-346. doi:10.1177/1461444815608807

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community detection algorithms:

Bedi, P., & Sharma, C. (2016). Community detection in social networks. Wires: Data Mining & Knowledge Discovery6(3), 115-135.

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CRUZ, J. D., BOTHOREL, C., & POULET, F. (2014). Community Detection and Visualization in Social Networks: Integrating Structural and Semantic Information. ACM Transactions On Intelligent Systems & Technology5(1), 1-26. doi:10.1145/2542182.2542193

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Bai, X., Yang, P., & Shi, X. (2017). An overlapping community detection algorithm based on density peaks. Neurocomputing2267-15. doi:10.1016/j.neucom.2016.11.019

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topic-detection algorithms:

Zeng, J., & Zhang, S. (2009). Incorporating topic transition in topic detection and tracking algorithms. Expert Systems With Applications36(1), 227-232. doi:10.1016/j.eswa.2007.09.013

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topic detection and tracking (TDT) algorithms based on topic models, such as LDA, pLSI (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Probabilistic_latent_semantic_analysis), etc.

Zhou, E., Zhong, N., & Li, Y. (2014). Extracting news blog hot topics based on the W2T Methodology. World Wide Web17(3), 377-404. doi:10.1007/s11280-013-0207-7

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The W2T (Wisdom Web of Things) methodology considers the information organization and management from the perspective of Web services, which contributes to a deep understanding of online phenomena such as users’ behaviors and comments in e-commerce platforms and online social networks.  (https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-44198-6_10)

ethics of algorithm

Mittelstadt, B. D., Allo, P., Taddeo, M., Wachter, S., & Floridi, L. (2016). The ethics of algorithms: Mapping the debate. Big Data & Society, 3(2), 2053951716679679. https://doi.org/10.1177/2053951716679679

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=algorithm
more on algorithms in this IMS blog

journalism

Malyarov, N. (2016, October 18). Journalism in the age of algorithms, platforms and newsfeeds | News | FIPP.com. Retrieved September 19, 2017, from http://www.fipp.com/news/features/journalism-in-the-age-of-algorithms-platforms-newsfeeds

future of Internet

Can the Internet be saved?

https://mondediplo.com/outsidein/can-the-internet-be-saved
In 2014 Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, proposed an online ‘Magna Carta’ to protect the Internet, as a neutral system, from government and corporate manipulation. He was responding after revelations that British and US spy agencies were carrying out mass surveillance programmes; the Cambridge Analytica scandal makes his proposal as relevant as ever.

Luciano Floridi, professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the Oxford Internet Institute, explains that grey power is not ordinary socio-political or military power. It is not the ability to directly influence others, but rather the power to influence those who influence power. To see grey power, you need only look at the hundreds of high-level instances of revolving-door staffing patterns between Google and European governmentsand the U.S. Department of State.

And then there is ‘surveillance capitalism’. Shoshana Zuboff, Professor Emerita at Harvard Business School, proposes that surveillance capitalism is ‘a new logic of accumulation’. The incredible evolution of computer processing power, complex algorithms and leaps in data storage capabilities combine to make surveillance capitalism possible. It is the process of accumulation by dispossession of the data that people produce.

The respected security technologist Bruce Schneier recently applied the insights of surveillance capitalism to the Cambridge Analytica/Facebook crisis.

For Schneier, ‘regulation is the only answer.’ He cites the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation coming into effect next month, which stipulates that users must consent to what personal data can be saved and how it is used.

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more on the Internet in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=internet

publish metrics ranking and citation info

EdTech Research – Where to Publish, How to Share (Part 2): Journal Metrics, Rankings and Citation Information

EdTech Research – Where to Publish, How to Share (Part 1): Journal Overview

electronic journals

International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning (IRRODL)

Publisher / Organization: Athabasca University Press

Year founded: 2000

Description: The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning disseminates original research, theory, and best practice in open and distributed learning worldwide.

First Monday

Publisher / Organization: The University of Illinois at Chicago- University Library

Year founded: 1996

Description: First Monday is among the very first open access journals in the EdTech field. The journal’s subject matter encompasses the full range of Internet issues, including educational technologies, social media and web search. Contributors are urged via author guidelines to use simple explanations and less complex sentences and to be mindful that a large proportion of their readers are not part of academia and do not have English as a first language.

URL: http://firstmonday.org/

International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education(ETHE)

Publisher / Organization: Springer (from 2013)

Academic Management: University of Catalonia (UOC)

Year founded: 2004

Description: This journal aims to: provide a vehicle for scholarly presentation and exchange of information between professionals, researchers and practitioners in the technology-enhanced education field; contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge regarding the use of technology and computers in higher education; and inform readers about the latest developments in the application of information technologies (ITs) in higher education learning, training, research and management.

URL: https://educationaltechnologyjournal.springeropen.com/

Online Learning (formerly JOLT / JALN)

Publisher / Organization: Online Learning Consortium

Year founded: 1997

Description: Online Learning promotes the development and dissemination of new knowledge at the intersection of pedagogy, emerging technology, policy, and practice in online environments. The journal has been published for over 20 years as the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks (JALN) and recently merged with the Journal of Online Learning and Teaching (JOLT).

URL: https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/

Journal of Educational Technology & Society

Publisher / Organization: International Forum of Educational Technology & Society

Year founded:1998

Description: Educational Technology & Society seeks academic articles on the issues affecting the developers of educational systems and educators who implement and manage these systems. Articles should discuss the perspectives of both communities – the programmers and the instructors. The journal is currently still accepting submissions for ongoing special issues, but will cease publication in the future as the editors feel that the field of EdTech is saturated with high quality publications.

URL: http://www.ds.unipi.gr/et&s/index.php

Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

Publisher / Organization: Ascilite (Organization) & PKP Publishing Services Network

Year founded: 1985

Description: The Australasian Journal of Educational Technology aims to promote research and scholarship on the integration of technology in tertiary education, promote effective practice, and inform policy. The goal is to advance understanding of educational technology in post-school education settings, including higher and further education, lifelong learning, and training.

URL: https://ajet.org.au/index.php/AJET

Print Journals

The Internet and Higher Education

Publisher / Organization: Elsevier Ltd.

YEAR FOUNDED: 1998

DESCRIPTION: The Internet and Higher Education is devoted to addressing contemporary issues and future developments related to online learning, teaching, and administration on the Internet in post-secondary settings. Articles should significantly address innovative deployments of Internet technology in instruction and report on research to demonstrate the effects of information technology on instruction in various contexts in higher education.

URL: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/the-internet-and-higher-education

British Journal of Educational Technology

Publisher / Organization: British Educational Research Association (BERA)

YEAR FOUNDED: 1970

DESCRIPTION: The journal publishes theoretical perspectives, methodological developments and empirical research that demonstrate whether and how applications of instructional/educational technology systems, networks, tools and resources lead to improvements in formal and non-formal education at all levels, from early years through to higher, technical and vocational education, professional development and corporate training.

LINK: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-8535

Computers & Education

Publisher / Organization: Elsevier Ltd.

Year founded: 1976

Description: Computers & Education aims to increase knowledge and understanding of ways in which digital technology can enhance education, through the publication of high quality research, which extends theory and practice.

URL: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/computers-and-education/

Tech Trends

Publisher / Organization: Springer US

Year founded: 1985

Description: TechTrends targets professionals in the educational communication and technology field. It provides a vehicle that fosters the exchange of important and current information among professional practitioners. Among the topics addressed are the management of media and programs, the application of educational technology principles and techniques to instructional programs, and corporate and military training.

URL: https://link.springer.com/journal/11528

International Journal on E-Learning (IJEL)

Year founded: 2002

Description: Advances in technology and the growth of e-learning to provide educators and trainers with unique opportunities to enhance learning and teaching in corporate, government, healthcare, and higher education. IJEL serves as a forum to facilitate the international exchange of information on the current research, development, and practice of e-learning in these sectors.

Led by an Editorial Review Board of leaders in the field of e-Learning, the Journal is designed for the following audiences: researchers, developers, and practitioners in corporate, government, healthcare, and higher education. IJEL is a peer-reviewed journal.

URL: http://www.aace.org/pubs/ijel/

Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching (JCMST)

Year founded: 1981

Description: JCMST is a highly respected scholarly journal which offers an in-depth forum for the interchange of information in the fields of science, mathematics, and computer science. JCMST is the only periodical devoted specifically to using information technology in the teaching of mathematics and science.

URL: https://www.aace.org/pubs/jcmst/

Just as researchers build reputation over time that can be depicted (in part) through quantitative measures such as h-index and i10-index, journals are also compared based on the number of citations they receive..

Journal of Interactive Learning Research (JILR)

Year founded: 1997

Description: The Journal of Interactive Learning Research (JILR) publishes papers related to the underlying theory, design, implementation, effectiveness, and impact on education and training of the following interactive learning environments: authoring systems, cognitive tools for learning computer-assisted language learning computer-based assessment systems, computer-based training computer-mediated communications, computer-supported collaborative learning distributed learning environments, electronic performance support systems interactive learning environments, interactive multimedia systems interactive simulations and games, intelligent agents on the Internet intelligent tutoring systems, microworlds, virtual reality based learning systems.

URL: http://learntechlib.org/j/JILR/

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia (JEMH)

Year founded: 1996

Description: JEMH is designed to provide a multi-disciplinary forum to present and discuss research, development and applications of multimedia and hypermedia in education. It contributes to the advancement of the theory and practice of learning and teaching in environments that integrate images, sound, text, and data.

URL: https://www.aace.org/pubs/jemh/

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (JTATE)

Publisher / Organization: Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE)

Year founded: 1997

Description: JTATE serves as a forum for the exchange of knowledge about the use of information technology in teacher education. Journal content covers preservice and inservice teacher education, graduate programs in areas such as curriculum and instruction, educational administration, staff development instructional technology, and educational computing.

URL: https://www.aace.org/pubs/jtate/

Journal on Online Learning Research (JOLR)

Publisher / Organization: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

YEAR FOUNDED: 2015

DESCRIPTION: The Journal of Online Learning Research (JOLR) is a peer-reviewed, international journal devoted to the theoretical, empirical, and pragmatic understanding of technologies and their impact on primary and secondary pedagogy and policy in primary and secondary (K-12) online and blended environments. JOLR is focused on publishing manuscripts that address online learning, catering particularly to the educators who research, practice, design, and/or administer in primary and secondary schooling in online settings. However, the journal also serves those educators who have chosen to blend online learning tools and strategies in their face-to-face classroom.

URL: https://www.aace.org/pubs/jolr/

 

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part 2

The most commonly used index to measure the relative importance of journals is the annual Journal Citation Reports (JCR). This report is published by Clarivate Analytics (previously Thomson Reuters).

SCImago

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR indicator) measures the influence of journals based on the number of citations the articles in the journal receive and the importance or prestige of the journals where such citations come from. The SJR indicator is a free journal metric which uses an algorithm similar to PageRank and provides an open access alternative to the journal impact factor in the Web of Science Journal Citation Report. The portal draws from the information contained in the Scopus database (Elsevier B.V.).

Google Scholar Journal Rank

Introduced by Google in 2004, Scholar is a freely accessible search engine that indexes the full text or metadata of scholarly publications across an array of publishing formats and disciplines.

Scopus Journal Metrics

Introduced by Elsevier in 2004, Scopus is an abstract and citation database that covers nearly 18,000 titles from more than 5,000 publishers. It offers journal metrics that go beyond just journals to include most serial titles, including supplements, special issues and conference proceedings. Scopus offers useful information such as the total number of citations, the total number of articles published, and the percent of articles cited.

Anne-Wil Harzing:

Citations are not just a reflection of the impact that a particular piece of academic work has generated. Citations can be used to tell stories about academics, journals and fields of research, but they can also be used to distort stories”.

Harzing, A.-W. (2013). The publish or perish book: Your guide to effective and responsible citation analysis. http://harzing.com/popbook/index.htm

ResearchGate

ResearchGate is a social networking site for scientists and researchers to share papers, ask and answer questions, and find collaborators. The community was founded in May 2008. Today it has over 14 million members.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar allows users to search for digital or physical copies of articles, whether online or in libraries. It indexes “full-text journal articles, technical reports, preprints, theses, books, and other documents, including selected Web pages that are deemed to be ‘scholarly. It comprises an estimated 160 million documents.

Academia.edu

Academia.edu is a social-networking platform for academics to share research papers. You can upload your own work, and follow the updates of your peers. Founded in 2008, the network currently has 59 million users, and adding 20 million documents.

ORCID

The ORCHID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is a nonproprietary alphanumeric code to uniquely identify scientific and other academic authors and contributors. It provides a persistent identity for humans, similar to content-related entities on digital networks that utilize digital object identifiers (DOIs). The organization offers an open and independent registry intended to be the de facto standard for contributor identification in research and academic publishing.

SCOPUS

The Scopus Author Identifier assigns a unique number to groups of documents written by the same author via an algorithm that matches authorship based on a certain criteria. If a document cannot be confidently matched with an author identifier, it is grouped separately. In this case, you may see more than one entry for the same author.

 

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more on metrics in this iMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=metrics

bots, big data and the future

Computational Propaganda: Bots, Targeting And The Future

February 9, 201811:37 AM ET 

https://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2018/02/09/584514805/computational-propaganda-yeah-that-s-a-thing-now

Combine the superfast calculational capacities of Big Compute with the oceans of specific personal information comprising Big Data — and the fertile ground for computational propaganda emerges. That’s how the small AI programs called bots can be unleashed into cyberspace to target and deliver misinformation exactly to the people who will be most vulnerable to it. These messages can be refined over and over again based on how well they perform (again in terms of clicks, likes and so on). Worst of all, all this can be done semiautonomously, allowing the targeted propaganda (like fake news stories or faked images) to spread like viruses through communities most vulnerable to their misinformation.

According to Bolsover and Howard, viewing computational propaganda only from a technical perspective would be a grave mistake. As they explain, seeing it just in terms of variables and algorithms “plays into the hands of those who create it, the platforms that serve it, and the firms that profit from it.”

Computational propaganda is a new thing. People just invented it. And they did so by realizing possibilities emerging from the intersection of new technologies (Big Compute, Big Data) and new behaviors those technologies allowed (social media). But the emphasis on behavior can’t be lost.

People are not machines. We do things for a whole lot of reasons including emotions of loss, anger, fear and longing. To combat computational propaganda’s potentially dangerous effects on democracy in a digital age, we will need to focus on both its howand its why.

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more on big data in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

more on bots in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bot

more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Tinder dating privacy

I asked Tinder for my data. It sent me 800 pages of my deepest, darkest secrets

The dating app knows me better than I do, but these reams of intimate information are just the tip of the iceberg. What if my data is hacked – or sold?

Every European citizen is allowed to do so under EU data protection law, yet very few actually do, according to Tinder.

With the help of privacy activist Paul-Olivier Dehaye from personaldata.io and human rights lawyer Ravi Naik, I emailed Tinder requesting my personal data and got back way more than I bargained for.

Some 800 pages came back containing information such as my Facebook “likes”, links to where my Instagram photos would have been had I not previously deleted the associated account, my education, the age-rank of men I was interested in, how many Facebook friends I had, when and where every online conversation with every single one of my matches happened … the list goes on.

Reading through the 1,700 Tinder messages I’ve sent since 2013, I took a trip into my hopes, fears, sexual preferences and deepest secrets. Tinder knows me so well. It knows the real, inglorious version of me who copy-pasted the same joke to match 567, 568, and 569; who exchanged compulsively with 16 different people simultaneously one New Year’s Day, and then ghosted 16 of them.

“What you are describing is called secondary implicit disclosed information,” explains Alessandro Acquisti, professor of information technology at Carnegie Mellon University. “Tinder knows much more about you when studying your behaviour on the app. It knows how often you connect and at which times; the percentage of white men, black men, Asian men you have matched; which kinds of people are interested in you; which words you use the most; how much time people spend on your picture before swiping you, and so on. Personal data is the fuel of the economy. Consumers’ data is being traded and transacted for the purpose of advertising.”.

In May, an algorithm was used to scrape 40,000 profile images from the platform in order to build an AI to “genderise” faces. A few months earlier, 70,000 profiles from OkCupid (owned by Tinder’s parent company Match Group) were made public by a Danish researcher some commentators have labelled a “white supremacist”, who used the data to try to establish a link between intelligence and religious beliefs. The data is still out there.

 

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more on social media dating in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=tinder

topics for IM260

proposed topics for IM 260 class

  • Media literacy. Differentiated instruction. Media literacy guide.
    Fake news as part of media literacy. Visual literacy as part of media literacy. Media literacy as part of digital citizenship.
  • Web design / web development
    the roles of HTML5, CSS, Java Script, PHP, Bootstrap, JQuery, React and other scripting languages and libraries. Heat maps and other usability issues; website content strategy. THE MODEL-VIEW-CONTROLLER (MVC) design pattern
  • Social media for institutional use. Digital Curation. Social Media algorithms. Etiquette Ethics. Mastodon
    I hosted a LITA webinar in the fall of 2016 (four weeks); I can accommodate any information from that webinar for the use of the IM students
  • OER and instructional designer’s assistance to book creators.
    I can cover both the “library part” (“free” OER, copyright issues etc) and the support / creative part of an OER book / textbook
  • Big Data.” Data visualization. Large scale visualization. Text encoding. Analytics, Data mining. Unizin. Python, R in academia.
    I can introduce the students to the large idea of Big Data and its importance in lieu of the upcoming IoT, but also departmentalize its importance for academia, business, etc. From infographics to heavy duty visualization (Primo X-Services API. JSON, Flask).
  • NetNeutrality, Digital Darwinism, Internet economy and the role of your professional in such environment
    I can introduce students to the issues, if not familiar and / or lead a discussion on a rather controversial topic
  • Digital assessment. Digital Assessment literacy.
    I can introduce students to tools, how to evaluate and select tools and their pedagogical implications
  • Wikipedia
    a hands-on exercise on working with Wikipedia. After the session, students will be able to create Wikipedia entries thus knowing intimately the process of Wikipedia and its information.
  • Effective presentations. Tools, methods, concepts and theories (cognitive load). Presentations in the era of VR, AR and mixed reality. Unity.
    I can facilitate a discussion among experts (your students) on selection of tools and their didactically sound use to convey information. I can supplement the discussion with my own findings and conclusions.
  • eConferencing. Tools and methods
    I can facilitate a discussion among your students on selection of tools and comparison. Discussion about the their future and their place in an increasing online learning environment
  • Digital Storytelling. Immersive Storytelling. The Moth. Twine. Transmedia Storytelling
    I am teaching a LIB 490/590 Digital Storytelling class. I can adapt any information from that class to the use of IM students
  • VR, AR, Mixed Reality.
    besides Mark Gill, I can facilitate a discussion, which goes beyond hardware and brands, but expand on the implications for academia and corporate education / world
  • IoT , Arduino, Raspberry PI. Industry 4.0
  • Instructional design. ID2ID
    I can facilitate a discussion based on the Educause suggestions about the profession’s development
  • Microcredentialing in academia and corporate world. Blockchain
  • IT in K12. How to evaluate; prioritize; select. obsolete trends in 21 century schools. K12 mobile learning
  • Podcasting: past, present, future. Beautiful Audio Editor.
    a definition of podcasting and delineation of similar activities; advantages and disadvantages.
  • Digital, Blended (Hybrid), Online teaching and learning: facilitation. Methods and techniques. Proctoring. Online students’ expectations. Faculty support. Asynch. Blended Synchronous Learning Environment
  • Gender, race and age in education. Digital divide. Xennials, Millennials and Gen Z. generational approach to teaching and learning. Young vs old Millennials. Millennial employees.
  • Privacy, [cyber]security, surveillance. K12 cyberincidents. Hackers.
  • Gaming and gamification. Appsmashing. Gradecraft
  • Lecture capture, course capture.
  • Bibliometrics, altmetrics
  • Technology and cheating, academic dishonest, plagiarism, copyright.

digital darwinism

We Need New Rules for the Internet Economy

Antitrust laws only go so far when addressing companies that don’t produce any physical goods. It is time to negotiate a new set of rules. Otherwise, our future economy will be dominated by just a few companies.

A DER SPIEGEL Editorial by Armin Mahler  November 03, 2017  06:12 PMhttp://www.spiegel.de/international/business/editorial-time-for-new-rules-for-the-ditigal-economy-a-1176403.html

There are still people out there who think that Amazon is nothing more than an online version of a department store. But it’s much more than that: It is a rapidly growing, global internet giant that is changing the way we shop, conquering more and more markets, using Alexa to suck up our personal data straight out of our living rooms and currently seeking access to our front door keys so it can deliver packages even when nobody’s home.

It wasn’t that long ago that EU efforts to limit the power of Google and Amazon on the European market were decried in the U.S. as protectionism, as an attempt by the Europeans to protect their own inferior digital economy. Now, though, politicians and economists in the U.S. have even begun discussing the prospect of breaking up the internet giants. The mood has shifted.

The digital economy, by contrast, is based on algorithms and its most powerful companies don’t produce any physical products. Customers receive their services free of charge, paying only with their data. The more customers a service provider attracts, the more attractive it becomes to new customers, who then deliver even more data – which is why Google and Facebook need not fear new competition.

first of all, the power of a company, and the abuse of that power, must be redefined. We cannot allow a situation in which these extremely large companies can swallow up potential rivals before they can even begin to develop. As such, company acquisitions must be monitored much more strictly than they currently are and, if need be, blocked.

Second, it must be determined who owns the data collected – whether, for example, it should also be made available to competitors or whether consumers should receive more in exchange than simply free internet search results.

Third, those disseminating content cannot be allowed to reject responsibility for that content. Demonstrably false claims and expressions of hate should not be tolerated.

And finally, those who earn lots of money must also pay lots of taxes – and not just back home but in all the countries where they do business.

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more on net neutrality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=net+neutrality

neoliberalism

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/aug/18/neoliberalism-the-idea-that-changed-the-world

It is a name for a premise that, quietly, has come to regulate all we practise and believe: that competition is the only legitimate organising principle for human activity.

we now live in Hayek’s world, as we once lived in Keynes’s.
He begins by assuming that nearly all (if not all) human activity is a form of economic calculation, and so can be assimilated to the master concepts of wealth, value, exchange, cost – and especially price. Prices are a means of allocating scarce resources efficiently, according to need and utility, as governed by supply and demand. For the price system to function efficiently, markets must be free and competitive. Ever since Smith imagined the economy as an autonomous sphere, the possibility existed that the market might not just be one piece of society, but society as a whole. Within such a society, men and women need only follow their own self-interest and compete for scarce rewards. Through competition, “it becomes possible”, as the sociologist Will Davies has written, “to discern who and what is valuable”.

Hayek built into neoliberalism the assumption that the market provides all necessary protection against the one real political danger: totalitarianism.

To prevent this, the state need only keep the market free.

This last is what makes neoliberalism “neo”. It is a crucial modification of the older belief in a free market and a minimal state, known as “classical liberalism”. In classical liberalism, merchants simply asked the state to “leave us alone” – to laissez-nous faire. Neoliberalism recognised that the state must be active in the organisation of a market economy. The conditions allowing for a free market must be won politically, and the state must be re-engineered to support the free market on an ongoing basis.

Even his conservative colleagues at the University of Chicago – the global epicentre of libertarian dissent in the 1950s – regarded Hayek as a reactionary mouthpiece, a “stock rightwing man” with a “stock rightwing sponsor”, as one put it.

Milton Friedman who helped convert governments and politicians to the power of Hayek’s Big Idea. But first he broke with two centuries of precedent and declared that economics is “in principle independent of any particular ethical position or normative judgments” and is “an ‘objective’ science, in precisely the same sense as any of the physical sciences”.

The internet is personal preference magnified by algorithm; a pseudo-public space that echoes the voice already inside our head. Rather than a space of debate in which we make our way, as a society, toward consensus, now there is a mutual-affirmation apparatus banally referred to as a “marketplace of ideas”.

“A taste is almost defined as a preference about which you do not argue,” the philosopher and economist Albert O Hirschman once wrote. “A taste about which you argue, with others or yourself, ceases ipso facto being a taste – it turns into a value.”

 

podcast at 2x

Speeding Up Your Podcasts Won’t Solve Your Problems

https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/CSFxq67eSC4

https://theringer.com/inefficiency-week-podcasts-speed-comprehension-f0ea43949e42

My note: sometimes around 2011, the Chronicle had a report on Berkeley students listening to coursecasts at 2X (can’t find the reference). Here some other sources about #speedlistening:

Stop listening to podcasts at 1.5x

185 comments
https://www.theverge.com/2015/2/17/8043077/stop-listening-to-podcasts-fast-speed
and the opposite opinion:

Lots of Us Listen to Podcasts Faster Than “Normal.” Join Us!

Aisha Harris Oct. 6 2016 1:58 PM http://www.slate.com/blogs/normal/2016/10/06/speed_listening_to_podcasts_is_totally_normal_and_practical.html

Watching lectures at increased speed? Discussion in ‘Medical Students – MD‘ started by kimbosliced, Dec 24, 2010.

https://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/watching-lectures-at-increased-speed.783750/

The Rise of ‘Speed-Listening’
Books can be places for intellectual wandering. They can also be mined of precious information with ruthless efficiency.

Megan Garber

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/06/the-rise-of-speed-listening/396740/

the introduction of Overcast, a podcast-playback app designed by the creator of the text-bookmaking app Instapaper. One of Overcast’s key selling points is a feature called Smart Speed. Smart Speed isn’t about simply playing audio content at 150 or 200 percent of the standard rate; it instead tries to remove, algorithmically, the extraneous things that can bulk up the play time of audio content: dead air, pauses between sentences, intros and outros, that kind of thing.
Here is also the general tendency of podcast use until 2015 from previous IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/18/digital-literacy-instruction-for-scsu-health-class/

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more on podcast in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=podcast+education

anonymous browsing data

‘Anonymous’ browsing data can be easily exposed, researchers reveal

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/aug/01/data-browsing-habits-brokers

A similar strategy was used in 2008, Dewes said, to deanonymise a set of ratings published by Netflix to help computer scientists improve its recommendation algorithm: by comparing “anonymous” ratings of films with public profiles on IMDB, researchers were able to unmask Netflix users – including one woman, a closeted lesbian, who went on to sue Netflix for the privacy violation.

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A hacker explains the best way to browse the internet anonymously.
https://www.facebook.com/techinsider/videos/824655787732779/ 

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more on privacy in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

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